Re: Stock Car Question


Douglas Harding
 

Steve, that in general is correct. Railroads and Livestock Shipping
Associations have published such data for many years. Here is a chart
showing how many animals of a given size will fit in a stockcar. This chart
is from the Union Pacific, but I also have one from the ATSF showing the
exact same numbers, so I suspect this was a standard used by many.



Union Pacific Livestock Shipping Guide and Directory

1941



Cattle per Car

Ave. Weight 300 400 500 600 700
800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400

36-ft. car 60 50 42 37
33 30 27 25 23 22
21 19

40-ft car 67 56 46 40
37 33 30 27 25 23
22 21



Hogs per Car

Ave. Weight 100 125 150 175 200
225 250 275 300 325 350 400

36-ft. car 130 115 100 89 79
73 68 62 59 56 53
47

40-ft. car 145 127 110 98 88
82 76 69 65 62 59
52



Sheep and Lambs per Car

Ave. Weight 50 75 100 125 150
180

36-ft. car 155 125 105 96 85
75

40-ft. car 170 138 116 104 94
83



The above figures are for single deck cars. In loading hogs or sheep in
double-deck cars the number loaded in the upper deck should be eight to ten
less than that recommended for loading in lower-deck or single-deck cars,
especially in hot weather.





For an earlier time period I found the following:

AMERICA'S AMAZING RAILWAY TRAFFIC National Geographic Magazine-April, 1923
By WILLIAM JOSEPH SHOWALTER



In the first place, a stock car carries less than 10 tons of hogs, less than
11 of sheep and goats, and less than 12 of horses and mules. Likewise, box
cars load less than 13 tons of hay and straw, cotton, wool, and eggs. On the
other hand, coal cars force the average loading upward. During the second
quarter of 1920 they moved more than 50 tons of bituminous coal, nearly 48
tons of anthracite, and more than 51 tons of iron ore.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

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