Re: Turn of the century freight car wheels


O Fenton Wells
 

Thanks,
I am also finding out the same thing in my Saluda Mountain (NC) research.
Apparently the Interstate was very late switching to steel wheels which
caused the Southern a big headache if their cars were in the descending
train. SR actually started limiting the IRR cars to no more than 8 per
train. Saluda was the main route for coal from Appalachia to the port of
Charleston SC
Interesting.
Thanks,
Fenton Wells

On Tue, May 15, 2012 at 4:32 PM, Tom Vanwormer <robsmom@...> wrote:

**


Fenton,
Regular occurrence on the Colorado Midland with its steep descents from
Hagerman Pass, later from Ivanhoe in both east and west directions and
eastbound out of Cascade down the 4% grade into Manitou. The ETT had
major sections on the inspections to be performed, the documentation of
those inspections and the operation of the Safety Switch a quarter of a
mile downgrade (east) of Cascade. We have found lots of period
newspaper stories of the problems with wheel and axle failures.
Tom VanWormer

O Fenton Wells wrote:

Thanks Tom. Did the cast iron and wroght iron overheat when decending a
steep grade?
Fenton Wells
On Tue, May 15, 2012 at 12:22 PM, Tom Vanwormer <robsmom@...>
wrote:
Fenton,


<>Mostly cast iron, some were wrought iron. Some of the eastern roads
had
started to switch to steel.
Tom VanWormer

srrfan1401 wrote:
Gentlemen, does anyone know what metal was used in fright car wheels
around the turn of the 20'th centruy? I'm talking about the year 1900.
I am interested because of the heat characteristics that the metal
would have had as the trains decended a steep grade. I understand the
early wheels heated up rapidly causing a safety hazard on early cars
on steep grades as a train decended. Also when were air brakes
required to be on all freight cars?
Any help is appreciated.
Fenton Wells





--
Fenton Wells
3047 Creek Run
Sanford NC 27332
919-499-5545
srrfan1401@...

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