Re: Not stripping, but painting (Scalecoat II)


Schuyler Larrabee
 

As to tape . . . I have used just about everything except 3M Packing tape . . . drafting tape, Magic tape, the blue painter’s tape . . . but I have had the best experience with 3M 218 Fine Line Tape. I have two rolls 1/16” and ½”. Simple sloth has “prevented” me from buying a couple other widths, but so far I’ve been able to get by with these two. Obviously, I can cut down the ½” where necessary. It has a very smooth, non-fuzzy edge and adheres well. I have place and re-place and re-place and replaced the tape to get it in >exactly< the right location many times, without it losing its stickiness. I press it down with a round wood toothpick using the pointed end, and also the other end sliced at a very flat angle to get a wider flat surface. Never (yet) had it lift paint (touch wood). It also (the narrow tape) can be convinced to bend around curved lines if not too tight a radius. I’ve also slit or kerfed it along one edge to get it to bend a little tighter.



I also use Microscale’s MicroMask when it gets just too complicated to deal with, using the tape as the edges of complicated things, like ladders.



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, January 02, 2017 7:49 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Not stripping, but painting (Scalecoat II)





Having just used Scale Coat II, be aware that it takes a lot longer to dry and fully cure than Floquil does.

Scale Coat also dries to a gloss finish - fine for decaling. A top coat of Testors Dull Coat or something similar that is alcohol based will reduce the shine and not harm the paint



For masking, I've used Tamaya (? Never could spell that name correctly when away from the workbench) which has a thin, reasonably low tack fine-edged masking tape which worked very well over Scale Coat II after it had cured for two or three days.



I've found that the commercial blue and green masking tape has a higher tackiness which can lift relatively fresh paint. One way I found to use it when needed, is to run a strip of it on a piece of glass rubbing it down well.. Then cut what is needed. Pulling it off the glass reduces some of the tacky-ness.



Ed Bommer









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