Re: the track the crane is on appears to be dual-gauge

Schuyler Larrabee
 

No erielack confirmation yet, but I am beginning to think the gauntlet track hypothesis is correct.



And BTW, that 1915 Hart-Parr tractor, which probably was in production in 1912 when the photo was taken was a serious beast!



Schuyler



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 4:38 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] the track the crane is on appears to be dual-gauge





Garth I saw that, but I took to be a reference to the number of “cases” or crates in the delivery. Note the same notation is on the Hart-Parr crate, on the lower right side. Hart-Parr tractors were very large with steel lugged wheels. I suspect the shipment of a single tractor took several crates.

<https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/190-hart-parr-tractor> https://www.asme.org/about-asme/who-we-are/engineering-history/landmarks/190-hart-parr-tractor



Doug Harding

<http://www.iowacentralrr.org> www.iowacentralrr.org



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 2:28 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] the track the crane is on appears to be dual-gauge





Doug,

The middle crate is marked "Case". So we have three major manufacturers of power equipment represented here. Interesting.

Yours Aye,



Garth Groff



On 3/14/17 12:42 PM, 'Douglas Harding' doug.harding@... [STMFC] wrote:



It appears to be a standard gauge and narrow gauge (3’?). The Erie was originally built to a broad gauge, but by the time of this photo had been standard gauged. The 4th rail, closest to the water, appears to be set on a concrete based, whereas the other three rails are on wood ties. So I don’t think it is a gauntlet track. It could be for an overhead traveling crane that is out of the picture, which begs the question if any overhead crane is available why use the railroad crane? That rail could also be an outside 3rd rail for electrical power, but I don’t recall 3rd rail electrics operating in the Hoboken area.



As to the crates, the one being lifted contains a gasoline tractor, or part of a tractor, from the Hart-Parr Tractor works of Charles City IA. The Hart-Parr Co built a factory in Charles City in 1901, and merged into the Oliver Farm Equipment Co in 1929. Oliver became part of White Tractor in 1960.



The crate on the Central Vermont flatcar is lettered “Caterpillar Power” from the Caterpillar factory in Peoria ILL.



Doug Harding

<http://www.iowacentralrr.org> www.iowacentralrr.org



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, March 14, 2017 11:04 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] the track the crane is on appears to be dual-gauge





Gauntlet track?
It is hard to tell... but are the right rail and the 2nd from left
also standard gauge?

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------

At 08:52 AM 3/14/2017, 'Claus Schlund' claus@... [STMFC] wrote:
I ask the august members of this list to persuse this image...

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-03-02-16/X0280.jpg

Note you can also click on "Next image" for a slightly different view.

I think this location might be the barge/lighter loading area at Hoboken,
but I don't know the DL&W all that well, so I could be wrong.

Notice that the track the crane is on appears to be dual-gauge.

So is this standard-gauge plus narrow-gauge track, or is this standard-gauge
plus broad-gauge track? Why would there be any need for dual-gauge track at
this location on the railroad?

Also, there appears to be something that might be yet another rail to the
right of the crane - or is this just a construction feature of the pier?
Perhaps for a traveling overhead crane that is out of sight?






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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