Re: Freight Car Roofs

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Jeff, Jim, and List Members,

Jim asked: "Can someone explain the white spots on the first car I mentioned above?"

The car appears to be a PRR class X29.

As to the white spots, here is my theory: it is not uncommon for the loading area of an industrial building to have an awning covering the loading platform area - this awning would cover the stretch between the building loading doors and likely end a little way past the freight car door above the freight car roof.

Any crud on the awning would wash down from there onto this section of freight car roof in the case where the car was parked there during a mild rainfall.

Nice photo in any case.

Claus Schlund

----- Original Message -----
From: "'Aley, Jeff A' Jeff.A.Aley@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Friday, May 05, 2017 10:51 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Freight Car Roofs


Jim,

First of all, do notice that one can click on the icon of three overlapping boxes in the lower right corner and select “original” size. On my screen that’s a big help.

When I enlarge it, it doesn’t look like bird poop at all. I’m not sure what it is, but it looks pretty easy to duplicate with a few splotches of paint.

Regards,

-Jeff


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Friday, May 05, 2017 9:44 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Freight Car Roofs



Hi,



So I'm sitting here staring - again - at the following image ...



https://donstrack.smugmug.com/UtahRails/Roger-Kingsford-Photos/i-k8WX95c



and (this time) I was focusing (again) on weathering on the car roofs in

the lower left quadrant. And especially on the first car past/above the

one with the farm equipment and the partial roof of the car in the lower

right corner.



Can someone explain the white spots on the first car I mentioned above?

It looks to me like seagull crap. But I'm at a loss to explain -where- the

droppings occurred ... they aren't near enough to the edge to make sense

to me. And there aren't any on the roof walk. And yet they seem to be

"lined up along the edge and pretty much at the same distance from the

edge. How is that possible? (I grew up where seagulls were common

and I've been 'observing' them and their behaviors for a long time.) I

can't even explain them landing on a freight car easily. I guess they

might land on a car spotted on a wharf ... but that far from the edge?



I love the look of the partial car in the bottom right corner. Anyone out

there have methods they think resembles that car's roof? Share? Or

should I just ask this on "Weathering".

- Jim B.



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