Re: bonsallscalecarshops D&RGW Gondolas

Mark Hemphill
 

Tim O'Connor -- I don't know the time frame of your video, but if it was taken in the 1923-1960 time frame, the pig iron would most likely be from Ironton, Utah, and most likely would be en route to Pittsburg, California.  Ironton was a 600-ton per day blast furnace / byproduct coke oven plant built in 1922-1923 to supply pig iron to Columbia Steel's open-hearth furnaces at Pittsburg and Torrance, Calif. Those open-hearths supplied a plate mill, hot-rolled sheet mill, cold-rolled sheet mill, and tinplate mill at Pittsburg; I don't have the paper in front of me to list what type(s) of rolling mills were at Torrance. (Columbia Steel also purchased an existing steel mill (open-hearths, rolling mills) at Portland, Oregon, at some point.)  US Steel bought Columbia Steel in 1930 and operated it as a subsidiary. US Steel bought the Geneva Works from the Defense Plant Corporation in 1946, and operated it as the subsidiary Geneva Steel Co., until 1951, when the two Utah/California steel companies were merged as Columbia-Geneva Steel Co., a USS subsidiary. A 900-ton blast furnace purchased from a defunct mill at Joliet, Illinois, was re-erected at Ironton in 1943 by the Defense Plant Corporation, to increase the pig-iron supply at Pittsburg. The DPC sold the 900-ton blast furnace to Kaiser Steel post-war; Kaiser at the time was having difficulties getting enough iron out of its blast furnaces at Fontana to supply its open-hearths. Kaiser later resold this to USS. In 1943, Blast Furnace & Steel Plant reported that 75% of the pig iron output of Ironton was going to Pittsburg and Torrance, with the balance sold locally or in California to foundries.

Mark Hemphill

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