Re: Unloading Airplane Engines


John Barry
 

Spen, not the ((-№"₦@: auto correct mis-spelling

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights
Caen, Normandy on my cell phone

707-490-9696 


PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736

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On Tue, 5/21/19, John Barry <northbaylines@att.net> wrote:

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Unloading Airplane Engines
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: Tuesday, May 21, 2019, 12:01 AM

Ding, ding , ding Spend is a winner! 
The photo location is inside AF plant 4 located adjacent to
Fort Worth Army Airfield, later Carswell AFB, and now Joint
Reserve Base Fort Worth. The government owned, contractor
operated plant was constructed by the Defence Plant
Corporation in 1941 and operated by Consolidated Aircraft
and it's successors. The main production building is over a
mile long. I didn't get to see it ful of B-24s, but I did
see it in the 80's with the F-16. A very impressive sight
And although the Brewster Buckaneer cowl is similar, their
plants were in NY and PA.

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA


707-490-9696 


PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736

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On Mon, 5/20/19, Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@centurylink.net>
wrote:

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Unloading
Airplane Engines
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Date: Monday, May 20, 2019, 9:25 PM


    On 5/20/2019
11:58 AM, Bob Chaparro via
      Groups.Io wrote:

   
   
      An
undated photo. Note
          the
packaging of the propellers.
      https://texashistory.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metapth41072/?q=railroad
      Perhaps
one of our
         
airplane experts can tell us what kind of engines
these are.
     

   
    Bob,

   

    The look like Pratt and
Whitney Twin Wasp radial engines
for the
    Consolidated B-24 bomber
used extensively in Europe
during the later
    part of WWII.

   

    https://www.lockheedmartin.com/en-us/news/features/history/b-24.html

   

    Scroll down on this page
to see a photo and description
of the
    engine mounted on the
plane.

   

    http://www.aviation-history.com/consolidated/b24.html

   

    I am making an educated
guess. since the photo is
credited to
    Lockheed Martin, Fort
Worth, Texas. Consolidated was
absorbed into
    Lockheed and the B-24
was built in Fort Worth, among
several other
    locations. The oval
shape of the nacelle was evocative
of the B-24.
    The propellers are
clearly three bladed. I would guess
that the
    photo was taken in
1943.

   

    Spen Kellogg

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