Re: SOMETIMES YOU JUST HAVE TO BLINK

Bruce Smith
 

Bill,

The examples that you site are all different from each other!

1) DT&I hopper. As has been stated here many, many times, it was possible for midwestern or even right coast road hoppers to make their way to the coast. This was typically not “unusual” but for that commodity, was “normal” in that a left coast customer needed a very specific mineral product in carload amounts. Most frequently we have been referred to metallurgical coal.

2) Red, white, and blue New Haven car. These “RB” cars could potentially be called to the left coast with a load of Maine potatoes. Alternatively, they could make their way to the left coast in the off season to be used for Washington State potatoes, or other cargoes in need of insulated service (or potentially even just as general service cars.)

3) PRR gondola with LCL containers. NOPE

4) Your photo, PRR gondola with MINERAL containers. Unlikely, but possible. One thing trends towards the unlikely, in that these containers were often used for cement, which was a “local” commodity. OTOH, they could be used for small batches of coke or lime, and therefore might be ordered up, much like the DT&I hopper above.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Aug 19, 2019, at 2:13 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...> wrote:

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The comments following Lester Brewer’s post on his excellent container car got my attention.  When if finished the above car I felt that as a Southern Pacific modeler this car never saw SP trackage.  My suspicions were reinforced by the comments that Lester’s cart probably never ventured off line.  I recently uncovered pbotos of a single DT&I hoopper cdar and a red, white and blue New Haven car in San Francisco gave credence to a couple of other (odd balls) on my roster.

Until somthing turns up on this I will just have to blink:

Bill Pardie

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