Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Hauling Sand before Covered Hoppers Became Popular


A&Y Dave in MD
 

Maybe not relevant (no sand was listed) by my database from 1934 Southern Railway in North Carolina includes the following (cement, plaster, and soda ash all in boxcars):
columns are
Road, car number, B for Boxcar, contents of car, waybilled destination, tons, type of car (notes from Al Brown).

C&O
82237
B
Cement
Elkin
50
40' SS 1-1/2D bx
SOU
169098
B
Cement
N Wilkesboro
50
36' DS bx: SU
SOU
157403
B
Cement
Elkin
76
36' DS bx: SU
NC&StL
14184
B
Cement
N Wilkesboro
57
36' Fowler bx
N&W
120552
B
Cement
Elkin
76
USRA SS bx: BK
N&W
51301
B
Cement
Elkin
76
40' DD stl bx: BS
N&B
787
B
Cement
K29
52
"USRA" stl bx
N&W
67730
B
Plaster
Burlington
42
40' SS 1½D bx: BL
C&O
82129
B
Cement
Elkin
50
40' SS 1-1/2D bx
C&G
3118
B
Soda Ash
Greensboro
61
40' SS bx
C&O
85537
B
Cement
K84
50
36' DS bx
CMStP&P
701047
B
Cement
K29
50
USRA SS bx
PRR
567563
B
Cement
W Salem
50
X29 bx
SOU
134300
B
Cement
K41
10
36' DS bx
N&W
50794
B
Plaster
Burlington
40
40' DD stl bx: BS
CNJ
20226
B
Plaster
W Salem
42
USRA SS bx: XMf
PRR
596143
B
Cement
W Salem
50
USRA SS bx: X26
B&O
277957
B
Cement
W Salem
50
 '23 ARA stl bx: M-26d
MP
91048
B
Soda Ash
Raleigh
47
"USRA" SS bx
N&B
774
B
Cement
W Salem
52
"USRA" stl bx
DL&W
42455
B
Soda Ash
K103
44
36' DS bx

There was also a lot of stone, gravel and clay (many so not listed), but to my surprise nothing labeled as sand or anything like it.  Might be the trains or the location.

Dave

Tuesday, June 16, 2020, 1:19:16 PM, you wrote:


Schuyler;
 
From my research and experiences, there were some in my area that were important:  foundry sand, glass sand, “green” sand, and locomotive sand.
 
What were the properties that were important to those uses, and how would this affect shipment and cars used?
 
Thanks!
 
Elden Gatwood
 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io
Sent: Tuesday, June 16, 2020 1:08 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Hauling Sand before Covered Hoppers Became Popular
 
There are two varieties of sand (and probably further distinctions can be made of each).  There’s beach sand, which is rounded grains (also what’s in the Sahara desert) from the wave (and wind) action.  I would surmise that variety of sand would need to be covered so it doesn’t blow away.
The other variety is angular sand, which comes from (typically) sand pits away from water.  Angular sand is required for use in concrete, as it will lock together with the cement matrix to form a solid durable structure.  I would guess that angular sand >might< be shipped without being covered as it would be less likely to blow away in transit.
 
And at this point I will point out one of my pet issues with the distinction between concrete and cement.  Cement is an element in making concrete.  Cement is not, directly, concrete.
 
Schuyler
 
From: 
main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of reporterllc via groups.io
Sent: Monday, June 08, 2020 10:17 PM
To: 
main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Hauling Sand before Coverd Hoppers Became Popular
 
What kind of car was used? I am referring to bulk sand from a pit that ships out sand and gravel. Perhaps this sand would not be that specialized. Wouldn't it need to be protected from the weather? On a side note, In the early 1970s (long after covered hoppers became popular) I remember a tower operator referring to an ancient gondola in a consist loaded with sand. I did not see it and wondered if it was covered.

Victor A. Baird
Blockedhttp://www.erstwhilepublications.com



--
David Bott

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____________________________
David Bott, modeling the A&Y in '34

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