Re: Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers


Bruce Smith
 

Dennis, Don,

I had an alternative explanation that is purely speculative, as yours are. Perhaps these boards have been removed by workers as part of the salvage operation. That could either be to assess the condition of the insulation, or to open up the sides to allow it to dry, without too severely damaging the integrity of the sides. Uniform locations would explain the regularity 😉

I believe that boards are missing in what appears to be multiples of 2 because of the use of V center V siding that has the appearance of 2 boards for every actual board.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 9, 2020 4:09 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Flood Damaged PFE Reefers
 
On Thu, Jul 9, 2020 at 12:36 PM, Donald B. Valentine wrote:

If you look at both photos the cars all show a 4 and 4 panel pattern on either

side of the doors in the same places n the car sides even if the number of individual boards lost varies.

This leads me to wonder just how these cars were originally constructed or “assembled”. Could it be

that panels of siding were assembled as units before actually being applied to the sides of the cars?

I noticed that too, Don, the missing siding seems to be at the car post locations. Since the siding is a single layer of T&G, I don't see any way to blame it on panels. Here is what I think happened. The siding is nailed to girths; horizontal wood rails that are fitted between the posts. That means it's likely a lot of nails in those strips of siding adjacent to the posts only caught the end of the girth, so those boards were not attached quite as solidly as the strips further from the posts. When subjected to the scouring action of the flood waters, those were the first boards to let go. It's also possible that the proximity of the post put more pressure on those siding boards as the current tried to force it's way between. Whatever the reason it is clearly related to the position of the car posts, and it was consistent along the length of both cars.

Dennis Storzek

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