Re: Was there ever a clinic on Delano-based paint and weathering?


Bruce Smith
 

Dave, Folks,

Lots of people have chimed in, but now, as the son of one the three most senior research scientists at Eastman Kodak, who spent 90% of his career working on film dyes, let me address this issue. 

Yes, Kodachrome is the, or one of the "most accurate and stable color film(s) of that era". However, all photosensitive molecules have specific wavelengths or ranges of wavelengths of light that they are more responsive too. The combination of dyes in Kodachrome was weighted to emphasize the warmth of reds and yellows. In the immortal words of Paul Simon "it makes all the world a sunny day".

Bottom line? As I have argued for years, while photos can give us ideas about color (and often good ideas), color photos cannot provide precise color matches.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of devansprr <devans1@...>
Sent: Friday, November 13, 2020 12:01 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Was there ever a clinic on Delano-based paint and weathering?
 
Re: Delano film color

I thought Delano's WWII color film was Kodachrome? Arguably the most accurate and stable color film of that era?

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