Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Was there ever a clinic on Delano-based paint and weathering?


Bruce Smith
 

Bill,

Sorry, but you’ve “triggered” me. Please save us from the pseudo-science babble of people like your optometrist friend. Bottom line, the emission and absorption wavelengths of refracted and reflected light from a surface (ie, the “color” of that surface) are determined by physics and are what makes any given “color” that color. That is not subject to interpretation. It is thought that individual optical receptors (rods and cones in the eye) may respond to the same wavelength differently in different individuals. Here’s where it get tricky and your friend left out a lot of details. However, even though different eyes respond differently, your brain then “learns” that the input it receives for that wavelength is say PRR, 1930’s Freight car color. My brain learns the same thing even though the input from my receptors may differ some. When given samples to select from, we will both be able to pick the ones that match. We will both think that these are an oxide red. Here’s where it gets weird, and maybe where your friend is trying (and failing) to capture the weirdness. If you were to provide my brain with the input from your optical receptors, that 1930’s freight car color might look blue to me (as an extreme example), because now my brain is getting input from receptors that are tuned differently. The color of the object has not changed, it is the PERCEPTION of the color that has changed. 

So, while our biochemical perception of those may differ, our ability to perceive those colors in context is pretty much the same. I’m afraid that there is no excuse here for getting your freight car colors wrong. 

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

On Nov 16, 2020, at 1:52 PM, erieblt2 <williamfsmith22@...> wrote:

My optometrist friend rightly points our eyes ‘see’ different colors from  others peoples eyes. This color thing is important to me too. We need to allow a more relaxed definition. For example weathered PRR ‘Brunswick Green’ is ‘a shade of blackish’  Period. Respectfully, Bill S


On Nov 16, 2020, at 10:14 AM, Gatwood, Elden J SAD <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:


Bruce;
 
Of course I agree with you, but what else do we have to go by?  Kodachrome looks more accurate than any other film I ever took.  OK, warmer, but warm is good.
 
If I look at a photo or model, and it looks wrong, I will always feel it is wrong.  Vice versa.  We are only modeling a reality we want to look right.
 
And you cannot tell me the PRRT&HS “paint chips” we worked on as a group for so many years did not get consensus agreement that they look phenomenally correct!
 
Elden Gatwood
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Friday, November 13, 2020 10:18 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Was there ever a clinic on Delano-based paint and weathering?
 
Elden sez:


"Kodachrome…..they are the only slides I took that looked like the real thing."


Actually, Elden, they are the only slides that look like your MEMORY of the real thing 😉. Memory is a notoriously tricky thing and tends to "warm" colors, just like Kodachrome. Kodak, or, as we from Rochester like to say, "The Great Yellow Mother to Us All" knew what they were doing. People are pleased when their photos look even better than their memories!


Regards,
Bruce 
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


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