Re: Can someone comment on what the exact meaning of the shown hand signal is?


Gary Roe
 

Claus,

When I worked for a railroad back in the 70's, riding on the top of cars was not done, of course.  However, some of the older fellows used a signal similar to the one shown; but it has to be animated to be shown properly.  They would stretch their arms out like that to indicate that the cut was nearing where they wanted to stop.  The Engineer would start slowing down.  Then, as the cut got within a car length or so, the Switchman would rock his body side to side, bending at the waist, arms still outstretched.  The Engineer would start applying the brakes.  Just before the cut reached where they wanted it to stop, the Switchman would drop both arms in the traditional "stop" signal.  Hope you can get the idea from my description.

gary roe
quincy, illinois



On Wednesday, October 27, 2021, 07:50:39 AM CDT, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) <claus@...> wrote:


Hi List Members,
 
The set of images linked below show a trainman on top of a boxcar giving hand signals to the locomotive crew. The title sez 'Switchman giving the "go ahead" signal on an Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad train'. Can someone comment on what the exact meaning of the shown hand signal is?
 
 
 
 
Thanks in advance
 
Claus Schlund

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