Re: USAX 11225 Questions


Bruce Smith
 

Tim,

From the AC&F book by Ed Kaminski, a sister car, SHPX 17561, 2/16/43, the right end stencil reads:

FOR LIQUIDS NOT OVER
8 LBS PER GAL. MAX. VAPOR
PRESSURE 16 LBS. P.S.I.  (might be 15, not 16)
ABSOLUTE 100 F.
EMERGENCY USG-A
A.C.&F. CO.
2-9-43
(handrail)
SAFETY VALVES 25 LBS. (might be 29?)
TANK 80(??) LBS.
TESTED 2-9-43
AT MILTON PA.
BY AC&F CO.
BUILT 2-43

And yes, it does really say LBS. P.S.I., lettering courtesy of the department of redundancy department.

Regards,
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
Sent: Sunday, June 26, 2022 10:35 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [EXT] Re: [RealSTMFC] USAX 11225 Questions
 
CAUTION: Email Originated Outside of Auburn.

I don't see an ICC class in this 1942 builder photo but there is an "EMERGENCY" in
small letters, followed by what looks like x15A ? ( 115A? or something else? )


On 6/13/2022 7:43 PM, Bruce Smith wrote:
IIRC, these cars were also ICC Class 102, instead of the typical class 103 of the era.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


This was a temporary relaxation of tank car construction standards in 1942 for the purpose of building up a fleet of cars to haul crude oil and gasoline until new pipelines could be built to handle the load. Their primary distinguishing trait was  the use of 4-course tank shells.

David Thompson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

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