Re: Loads: Weight of steel beams


Scott Pitzer
 

The reason I didn't want to believe it was supposed to be 87 cubed (in this conversion) was that I tried it out to see if it would be in the ballpark. That makes each beam about 35,000 pounds, more than twice the weight estimated by others. These Plastructs are hefty in cross section, but are they THAT hefty? By the way, I'm talking about #90519, 7/16 white styrene, not the ABS product.
It's okay with me if I end up with four beams, tucked in below the height of the sides... especially if these beams are so unusually large (better to hide them a bit.)
Scott Pitzer
-----------------
Dear Scott,
I don't want to sound patronising but you have made a common error - 1:87 is
the linear scale, but since you are converting volume you need to cube it,
to give you a multiplier of 658,503.
Try that and see if you don't come out a bit closer.
Regards
Richard White
-------------------
Based on Mike Aufderheide's and Fred Swanson's replies, it seems that my
eight 44' beams would be somewhere around 120,000 lbs., so I think I'll go
with that.
But I also tried mixing parts of other replies... to fit my "abilities"
and I know my answer was wrong. Would anyone like to try to figure out why?
Not having a graduated cylinder, I stuck all eight beams halfway into a
measuring cup (that's as far as they'd go) and I divided the resulting
displacement to come up with 3 ml (or 3 cc) displaced by one whole beam.
Since it's already a volume measure, I only have to multiply by 87 to
convert for HO scale, correct? (Not 87x87x87 as when starting with
lengths.) So 3cc scales out to 261cc.
If a cc of steel weighs 8 grams, then the prototype steel beam would weigh
261x8= 2088 grams. If there are about 454 grams in a pound, then the 44'
beam only weighs 4 1/2 pounds!
?????

Scott Pitzer





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