Re: BAR 3000-3599 SS boxcars


Gene Green <lgreen@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@o...>
wrote:
Jeff Skeels asks:

The recent thread on State of Maine insulated boxcars piqued my
interest in the BAR single sheathed cars in the 3000 - 3599 (former
1000 - 1599)series cars seen here;
http://www.fandckits.com/Images/6552Large.jpg

Were those cars all equiped with a wavy brake wheel or was this
just a damaged wheel.
That's an original brake wheel; I have several other photos of BAR
single
sheathed box cars with the same type of wheel. The depressions in
the rim
were intended to engage a brake club for more positive activation
of the
handbrake.
<snip>
Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520
The hand wheel shown in the photo was patented April 21, 1903 by
Pierce D. Schenck (Patent No. 725,780), was known as the "Perfect
Brake Wheel" and was marketed by the Dayton Manufacturing Company,
Dayton, Ohio. Dayton made a wide variety of malleable castings
mainly for passenger cars and street cars but also had a few items
for freight cars.

Dayton's passenger car hand brakes overlapped Adams and Westlake's
product line to a great extent. Dayton's passenger car hand brakes
can still be seen occassionally on passengers in current operation by
Amtrak.

But back to freight car hand brakes. Hand brake manufacturers would
never admit that a club was needed to tighten a hand brake. Indeed,
in the patent mentioned above the raised portions are described
as "convenient handles for grasping and abutments to take the
thrust." You can read 'club' into that last phrase if you like.
Some manufacturers even developed hand wheels expressly designed so
as to prevent the use of a club.

Gene Green

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