Re: Kodak - Slightly Off Topic...but Only Slightly.


Paul Hillman
 

Thanks A.T.,

I'd generally understood that water would separate prints, but was just wondering about any of the modern-marvels about such. I have some really good photos of the D&RGW narrow gauge in Durango and Chama, and other RR's, and they've gotten "stuck-together" over a time of storage. Don't want to lose their essence by experimentation.

Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: proto48er<mailto:atkott@swbell.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, August 26, 2005 5:54 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Kodak - Slightly Off Topic...but Only Slightly.


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>, "Paul Hillman" <chris_hillman@m<mailto:chris_hillman@m>...>
wrote:
> Yeah, not quite sure what the current, real quality of digital is,
(short of a $3,000.00 digital camera, etc.), but it looks like
the "old" print system is definitely on the way out. I used to
develop my own film and prints a few years back. I still have a 35mm
SLR and love it.
>
> But, I have another film OT question; what's the best way to
separate print-film pictures that are stuck together?
>
> Paul Hillman


Paul - I think you might try soaking the print film pictures in
distilled water - they were developed in water in the first place.
They should separate.

It is my understanding that a single 35mm black and white negative
holds the equivalent of 80 megapixels of data in "analog" form
(actually, it is digital when you get down to the molecular level).
A single 2-1/4" X 2-1/4" B&W negative holds 150 megapixels of data.
The negative is also a much better way to store data archivally -
the compact disc technology will probably be long obsolete, while
B&W negatives will still be great. I also understand that a digital
image on a compact disc will only last for about 20 years before it
needs to be removed and placed on new media. Maybe by then, a more
permanent form of storage will have been invented. A digital
picture can be transferred as a jpeg file several times before it
starts to break up - but when it does start to break up, it goes
away in spectacular fashion.

The above info comes from various articles in "Photo Techniques"
magazine. They are somewhat impartial - also do research on digital
and new wet photography films and papers.

Just another example of instant gratification over craftsmanship and
quality! A.T. Kott






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