Re: Forreston IL - 12/1950 thru 5/1951 IC Deliveries to the MILW


Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Foreseen IL was on IC's original "Land Grant" line between Cairo and Galena. By 1950, the line between Centralia and Freeport (12.5 miles north of Foreseen) had been reduced to secondary status. At Foreseen, this IC line crossed the MILW's Iowa Main line 107 miles west of Chicago.


Between December 1st, 1950 and May 31st, 1951, the IC delivered 3,615 freight cars to the MILW at Forrester. The 3,615 cars translates to about 20 cars per day; hence, Forrester should not be considered a major interchange point between the IC and MILW. The IC Line appears to have been a bypass around the congestion in Chicago for lower grade commodities as per the following:

Commodity Total % Total Predominant Type of Car
Products of Agriculture 90 2.5% Box (63); Reefer (27)
Products of Animals 27 0.7% Box (16); Stock (11)
Products of Mining
Coal 2,406 66.6% Hopper (2,088); Gon (282)
Bauxite 90 2.5% Box (90)
Sand & Gravel 76 2.1% Hopper (53); Gon (21);
Salt 99 2.7% Box (99)
Other Mining 44 1.2%
Total Mining 2,715 75.1%
Forest Products Lumber 119 3.3% Lumber (119)
Other Forest 35 1.0% Gon (30)
Total Forest Products 154 4.3%
Manufacturing & Misc. Petroleum Prod. 189 5.2% Tank (187); Box (2)
Cement 119 3.3% Box (111); Cov. Hop (8)
Other Manf. & Misc. 237 6.6%
Total Manf. & Misc. 544 15.0%
Merchandise 1 0.0% Box (1)
Empty Cars 92 2.5% Tank (71)
Total Cars 3,615 100.0%

After cross referencing the Excel spreadsheet of the disk which included the Forrester data as transcribed by Ted Richardson with the April 1949 and April 1955 ORER's, it should be noted that there may have been errors in transcribing car owners & car numbers: - either by the Forrester Agent or Ted. With this caveat in mind, the 3,615 cars can be broken down into the following types:

Car Type Total % Total
Flat Cars - All 17 0.5%
Gons - Solid Bottom, Drop Ends 64 1.8%
Gons - Solid Bottom, Fixed Ends 133 3.7%
Gons - Center Drop Doors 16 0.4%
Gons - Side Drop Doors 128 3.5%
Total Gondolas 343 9.5%
Hoppers - Ballast 9 0.2%
Hoppers - Twin 2,003 55.4%
Hoppers - Trips or Quads 127 3.5%
Total Open-Top Hoppers 2,139 59.2%
Covered Hoppers 37 1.0%
Hop & Gons - Unknown 25 0.7%
Reefers - Meat 3 0.1%
Reefers - Produce 44 1.2%
Total Reefers 47 1.3%
Stock Cars - All 11 0.3%
Tank Cars - All 273 7.6%
Boxcars - Automobile 6 0.3%
Boxcars - Ventilated 3 0.1%
Boxcars - General Service 713 19.7%
Total Boxcars 722 20.0%

The correlation between the owners of foreign boxcars of those interchanged at Forrester with the 12/31/1950 boxcar roster was in line with other studies which I have made from sundry wheel reports, switch lists, etc. - not perfect, but within the ballpark except, maybe, for the Southwest Region, as per the following (at least, there is no problems with sampling as this data reflects 100% of the boxcars delivered by the IC to the MILW):

Region Total % 12/31/1950 % Variance/
Of Owners Reported % Tot. Roster Variance Tot Rptd.
Total 722 100.0% 100.0%
IC 40 5.5% 2.9%
Canadian 17 2.4%
Short Lines 3 0.4%
Unknown 12 0.7%
Total Foreign 650 90.0% 97.1%

Total Foreign 650 100.0% 100.0% - -
New England 15 2.3% 2.4% (0) -2.4%
Great Lakes 110 16.9% 19.3% (16) -12.5%
Central East 89 13.7% 16.7% (19) -17.9%
Pocahontas 33 5.1% 4.3% 5 18.2%
Southern (*) 92 14.2% 11.8% 16 20.4%
Northwest 109 16.8% 16.6% 1 0.8%
Central West 119 18.3% 19.7% (9) -7.3%
Southwest 81 12.5% 8.8% 24 41.7%

(*) - The Southern Region's Totals exclude the IC.

I have no explanation as to why there were so many cars owned by RR's in the Southwest Region which were delivered by the IC to the MILW other than it was the luck of the draw.

That more boxcars owned by the Pocahontas and Southern Region Roads than would be expected if only the Percent of 12/31/1950 Roster of boxcars owned are examined may be a reflection that the IC was somewhat the conduit between those roads and the MILW.

For hoppers & gons, however, there was hardly any correlation - since the ICC did not separate gons from hoppers until 1955, hoppers & gons must be combined to do a similar type ownership analysis as can be done for boxcars. The ownership breakdown of hoppers & gons follows:

Region Total % 12/31/1950 % Variance/
Of Owners Reported % Tot. Roster Variance Tot Rptd.
Total 2,544 100.0% 100.0%
IC - Home 1,750 68.8% 3.2%
Short Lines 17 0.7%
Private Owned 6 0.2% 0.9%
Unknown 17 0.7%
Total Foreign 755 29.7% 95.9%

Total Foreign 755 100.0% 100.0% - -
New England 6 0.8% 0.7% 1 16.3%
Great Lakes 236 31.3% 18.7% 95 77.6%
Central East 128 17.0% 30.8% (105) -53.3%
Pocahontas 16 2.1% 14.8% (96) -99.6%
Southern (*) 231 30.6% 12.0% 140 179.4%
Northwest 59 7.8% 9.0% (9) -15.7%
Central West 52 6.9% 9.3% (18) -30.3%
Southwest 26 3.4% 4.5% (8) -27.1%

That 68.8% of all Hoppers & Gons were IC-owned was a reflection of mines served by the IC in Southern Illinois. The MILW could reload only a tiny fraction of IC's Hoppers & Gons, and return them to the IC. The bulk of IC's hoppers & gons were probably returned empty to the IC - probably because the Foreseen data did not include any MILW deliveries to the IC.

There were 92 NYC Hoppers & Gons Reported in the Great Lakes Region's 236 vs. only 16 PRR Hoppers & Gons in the Central East's Region's 128. The NYC had a presence in Southern Illinois while the PRR did not. There were no MONON (Central East Region) hoppers cited indicating either there was no Southern Indiana coal being delivered to the MILW at Forrester, or the MONON routed its hoppers through Chicago, and, thus, getting a fuller share of the revenue.

In the Southern Region (ex IC), 115 of the hoppers & gons were owned by the L&N created a 73 car positive variance. This 73 car variance largely offset the 96 negative variance in the Pocahontas Region. After all, coal mined in eastern Kentucky was closer to Forrester than coal mined in southern West Virginia where the Pocahontas Roads held sway.

The 273 Tank Cars may have been the third most populous of the car types delivered by the IC, but an analysis similar to the ones above for boxcars and hoppers & gons would not yield much because tank cars were either leased to or owned by shippers/consignees. 15 of the 273 were owned by shippers/consignees; 198 by private car lines like UTLX, GATX, SHPX, NAHX etc.; 46 by the US Army; and 14 unknown.

Of the 2,406 carloads of coal interchanged, the variety of car types was wide:

Type of Car Carloads % Total
Gon - Solid Bottom, Drop Ends 46 1.9%
Gon - Solid Bottom, Fixed Ends 111 4.7%
Gon - Center Drop Doors 15 0.6%
Gon - Side Drop Doors 110 4.6%
Hopper - Ballast 9 0.4%
Hopper - Twin 1,954 81.2%
Hopper - Trip or Quad 125 5.2%
Unknown or Unidentified 36 1.5%
Total 2,406 100.0%

Before concluding this analysis, I would like to thank John Swanson for rescuing the Forrester interchange data and Ted Richardson for transcribing it onto a spreadsheet. Meanwhile, challenges, questions and comments to this analysis are welcome, and I will attempt to answer as best that I can.

Tim Gilbert

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