Re: Weight Stencils


Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

In perusing John Golden's photos of freight car models at the 2006 St. Louis RPM (web site is http://www.pbase.com/golden1014/2006_st_louis_rpm_meet&page=all ), I was amazed how many of these precision models had incorrect amounts in their Load Limit and Light Weight stencils. While this may seem a nitpicking point, if someone is going to expend the energy to super detail, paint & weather a freight car model to replicate the prototype, then they may as well get the stencils right, too. Let's review the Rules.

1) The sum of the Load Limit (LD LMT) plus Light Weight (LT WT) must equal a weight specified by the AAR, ICC, and FRA based upon the size of its truck axles and journals. This sum was called the Maximum Total Weight Allowed on Rail, but now commonly referred to as the Gross Rail Load or GRL. Any exceptions to this Rule required that a star be stenciled next to the Load Limit - this exception will be discussed later.

2) The Nominal Capacity (CAPY) of a car had to be equal or less than the Load Limit in multiples of 1,000's of pounds. It was the discretion of the owner to select whatever amount of Capacity he wanted although there were a recommended Standard Capacity for each size truck.

3) Between 1925 and 1962, the Maximum Total Weight Allowed on the Rail for a car with four axles (two four wheel trucks) were (dashes are necessary to maintain column integrity for Yahoo):

------ Journal----- Total Wgt ----Standard Nominal
Axle -- Size ------- On Rail ------- Capacity
A --- 3 3/4" x 7" --- 66,000 -------- 40,000
B --- 4 1/4" x 8" -- 103,000 -------- 60,000
C --- 5" x 9" ------ 136,000 -------- 80,000
D --- 5 1/2" x 10" - 169,000 ------- 100,000
E --- 6" x 11" ----- 210,000 ------- 140,000
F --- 6 1/2" x 12" - 251,000 ------- 200,000

Note: The last page in almost every ORER published between 1925 & 1962 has a table including the Axles, Sizes of the Axle Journals, Total Weight on Rail and Standard Nominal Capacity.

Note: Frequently trucks are referred to as 40-ton, 50-ton, etc. trucks. The Standard Nominal Capacity is the basis for the reference.

4) After 1962, the Total Weight on Rail was increased for most of the Axle Sizes per the following:

------ Journal----- Total Wgt ----Standard Nominal --- Minimum
Axle -- Size ------- On Rail ------- Capacity ------- Axle Spacing
A --- (Obsolete)
B --- 4 1/4" x 8" -- 103,000 --------- 60,000 ------- 5' 1"
C --- 5" x 9" ------ 142,000 --------- 80,000 ------- 5' 3"
D --- 5 1/2" x 10" - 177,000 -------- 110,000 ------- 5' 6"
E --- 6" x 11" ----- 220,000 -------- 154,000 ------- 5' 8"
F --- 6 1/2" x 12" - 263,000 -------- 200,000 ------- 5' 10"
G --- 7" x 12" ----- 315,000 -------- 250,000 ------- 6' 0"

Note: Modelers of the 1960's are confronted a transition era with stencils applied before or after 1962. Cars built before 1962 but having post-1962 Total Weights on Rail signifies that the car was weighed after 1962 and there was a change of 100 pounds or more in the Light Weight which necessitated that the LD LMT and LT WT be restenciled.

5) Cars having a Star stenciled next to its Load Limit meant that no one except the Car Owner could change the amount. Before 1962, the star usually signified that there was a structural limitation to the load. The star was widely applied to old reefers. In these cases, the Load Limit still had to be more than the Nominal Capacity.

For cars with two four wheel trucks having a Total Weight on Rail of 264,000 or more, a star had to be placed next to the Load Limit using the appropriate star code "L", "M" and "N". These were adopted after the UMLER Data became the base of publishing ORER's in the mid-1970's.

Star --- Journal ---- Total Weight ---- Wheel
Code ---- Size ----- Allowed on Rail - Size
L --- 6 1/2" x 12" - 264-286,000 ----- 36" or 38"
M --- 6 1/2" x 12" ----- 286,000 ----- 36"
N --- 7" x 12" --------- 315,000 ----- 38"

Note: Frankly, I don't understand this table, but include it only for the modelers of modern equipment. Perhaps, someone can explain it. (Nominal Capacity is not an issue since the requirement to have a CAPY stencil was eliminated in the 1980's.)

Hope this helps those modelers who spend the time to super detail their models - the correct weight stencils can be just another part of super detailing.

Hope this helps, Tim Gilbert

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