Re: Whats a 1913 "Barber" Truck?


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 18, 2007, at 6:31 AM, Bob Karig wrote:

I've posted a PDF file at the address below that compares a number of early
cast-steel trucks with separable journal boxes. For those on dial-up, it's
about 278K.

http://home.sprintmail.com/~karig/separable.pdf
Nice, and useful, photos. However, you still seem to be laboring under some confusion about Andrews trucks. The trucks identified as Gould and Buckeye are, in fact, both Andrews trucks manufactured by the Gould Coupler Co. and the Buckeye Steel Castings Co. ASF developed and patented the Andrews design before the turn of the century, and the patents covered any truck with bolted-in journal boxes and bar steel lower journal box locator/retainers. However, ASF licensed the design to other truck manufacturers, and almost every truck manufacturer built several different variants of the Andrews truck between the turn of the century and the late 1920s. The Wolff truck also incorporated the main features of the Andrews design and may have been built under license, though the side frames were obviously unique in configuration. As Tony Thompson has already pointed out, the Bettendorf T-section truck, which pioneered the principle of journal boxes cast integral with the side frames, was also built under license by a number of other truck manufacturers than Bettendorf, and the same was true of ASF's Vulcan design in which cast steel side frames enclosed separate journal boxes in pedestal jaws. The DESIGNS are correctly identified as Andrews, Bettendorf, or Vulcan regardless of who cast the side frames or built the trucks.

Richard Hendrickson

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