Re: Sheetrock by Rail


original_coaster <ladanas@...>
 

Just to round out the "geographical roll call," whole neighborhoods
of houses in San Francisco were being constructed with
sheetrock/drywall in the late 40s. I grew up in such a house as did
most of my friends. (Homes like these in that area were the
inspiration for term "ticky-tacky.")

-- Paul
--- In STMFC@..., Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...> wrote:

As per an article in the October 1927 B&M EMPLOYEES MAGAZINE, the
Atlantic Gypsum Products Company of Newington NH shipped a full
train
load of its wallboard and plasterboard in boxcars on September 7th,
1927. In 1954, the B&M converted ten 40' flats built in 1923 for
gypsum
service with bulkheads and renumbered them into the #5300-5309
series.
In 1957, the B&M purchased ten PS-5 bulkhead flats which were
numbered
in the #5320-5329 series. Shortly thereafter, the B&M converted
another
ten PS-5 flats into bulkhead flats which were renumbered into the
#5330-5339 series.

The October 1927 article follows:


A RECORD BREAKING SHIPMENT
NEW NEW ENGLAND INDUSTRY SENDS OUT SOLID TRAIN LOAD OF ITS
PRODUCTS

The first complete trainload of gypsum building materials made
and
sold in New England for use in New England left the new plant of
the
Atlantic Gypsum Products Company over the Boston & Maine Railroad
on
September 7th (1927). This industry which replaces shipbuilding
as
Portsmouth's principal industrial activity other than the Navy
Yard is
less than a year old.

At a time when building contracts show a pronounced recession in
the
country as a whole, the 26 car trainload of gypsum material
(wallboard
and plaster) bought by New England dealers stands as an
indication of
the building activity within New England. It was consigned to
dealers
in all parts of New England: - ranging from Boston to Bangor and
from
Vineyard haven to Dover.

As one of the several new industries to locate in New England in
recent years, the Atlantic Gypsum Products Co. went to Portsmouth
a
few months ago to establish a plant which would both serve New
England
as well providing some products for national distribution. With a
long
established plant in New York and a supply of gypsum rock in Nova
Scotia, the company analyzed market opportunities, transportation
facilities and business conditions on the entire Atlantic
Seaboard
before making its decision. With speed rivaling that of war-time
when
Portsmouth built ships, a 65 acre plant was reconditioned, and
equipment erected for converting thousands of tons of gypsum rock
into
wallboard and plaster. Today the plant is one of the largest and
best
equipped of its kind in the building materials industry.

Shipments have been made from time to time in the last six
months, but
the 26 car train which left Portsmouth Yards beat all records for
single consignments of building materials made in New England for
New
England consumption.

The occasion was marked by a "dry launching," Elizabeth Raynes,
the 18
year old daughter of HC Raines, VP of Atlantic Gypsum, broke a
bottle
of salt water from Portsmouth harbor over the pilot of the B&M
locomotive when it was ready to start.

October 1927 Boston & Maine Employees Magazine

Tim Gilbert

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