Re: B&O Freight Car Red


jim_mischke <jmischke@...>
 

Colors on the CRT:

Researching at the B&OHS archives a few months ago, I found a whole
pile of genuine B&O color chips, including the postwar freight car
color. So I scanned them to distribute to the faithful. What came
up on the screen looked nothing like what I had in my hand.

There is no way I will show these scans to anyone. They are
profoundly misleading.

Beware of your computer screen. It lies, it lies.





Postwar B&O boxcar paint:

In the postwar era, B&O specified a number of vendors to supply
boxcar paint. Each formulation is a bit different, and oxidizes
differently over time. Plenty of room for variation in the bright
oxide red domain.

The collective wisdom at B&OHS is zinc chromate will do for a first
order approximation for 1945-1961 boxcar colors. Very subjective
until we know differently, or until the B&OHS can get this paint chip
replicated for the masses.





Pre War B&O freight car brown:

Prior to 1945, B&O seemed to mix their own paint. So did
housepainters in that day. The main pigment was ferric oxide, which
comes out a brown. Again plenty of room for variation in the
procured pigment, and the mixing. Still in the medium dark brown
domain. We've had a lot of trouble with this hue, because long
serving boxcars still wearing this paint oxidized so dramatically (to
a yucky red) by the time color film was exposed to them. The M-15j
at the Galewood freight house in the 1943 Jack Delano series at the
Library of Congress was the first freshly painted car we've
collectively seen.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Gene, you should look at the paint chips I posted - two
colors, from two paint vendors, on one order of B&O box
cars in 1951. And neither one looks like "zinc chromate"
to my eyes.

Tim O'Connor


At 8/3/2007 11:20 PM Friday, you wrote:
Bruce:
Thank you for the information. I will try the zinc chromatic
color.
Gene Deimling

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