Re: Towing "loops"?


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Feb 18, 2008, at 5:35 PM, Mike Brock wrote:

Armand Premo pointed out to me recently that certain box cars had a
"towing
loop" on the side of the car between the bolster and the car's end at
the
bottom of the side. This "loop" appears to be of steel and is
constructed so
that if one dropped a metal rod perpendicular to the track, it would
go
through the loop....
Towing loops were quite common on steam era freight cars, and some
railroads specified their application to all new or rebuilt cars. For
example, you'll see them on the side sills near the bolsters on all NYC
steel box cars. Sometimes they were mounted vertically under the side
sills instead of horizontally. Their purpose was to provide an
attachment point for the cable-and-winch arrangements which were widely
used at industrial spurs and team tracks to move cars into position for
loading and unloading. When there were no towing loops (also called
towing staples), the hooks on the cables were attached to any
convenient place on the car (e,g, sill steps, ladder stiles), which was
an open invitation to damage.

Richard Hendrickson

Join main@RealSTMFC.groups.io to automatically receive all group messages.