Re: The growing problem of erroneous captions


jim_mischke <jmischke@...>
 

Craig Bossler did the same thing for the B&O freight car book.

Except ....

1. The B&O point of contact pointedly did not invite our main B&O freight car expert to the evening slide show, mostly because that contact person wanted to be the big hero with no competition. Inexcusable.

2. Mr. Bossler had earler submitted a prelimiary draft to Morning Sun. When he sent the updated revised manuscript to the publisher, he was told the first one was good enough. So none of the B&O expert input was used and it shows. There is a major error in every other caption. A credible first draft, but it is not reliable enough for even reference.


With Morning Sun, TLC and many other railroad publishers, all value added comes from the author. There is no such thing as a first draft. The first and only submitted draft needs to be flawless.



To quote Henry Ford, "All history is bunk." He is so right.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, water.kresse@... wrote:



Guys,



Dave Hickcox (C&O Color Guide, Morning Sun) had the caption process down correct -- bring in the "experts" for beer and treats in a hotel room after a local train show and have them review the captions with the slides in front of them with him making the corrections/additions on 3 x5 cards for each slide.



Short and sweet for the reviewers.  Payment:  free book, good friendship and help/leads in the future.



Al Kresse


----- Original Message -----
From: cinderandeight@...
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, May 21, 2009 6:19:34 PM GMT -05:00 US/Canada Eastern
Subject: [STMFC] Re: The growing problem of erroneous captions








Guys,
I agree with so much of what you are all saying. Recently I was asked
"off handedly" if I could help with the captions of a new book. I agreed,
and the next day I received over 80 photos to caption, so I emailed back
asking for a timeframe for publication, and when he'd like the captions.
The answer was "the book is due out at the end of next month (six weeks
away), and I needed the captions two weeks ago."
I spent the next 7 days almost completely writing and rewriting
captions, farming out a small number and getting constant bombardments of emails
from the impatient editor.
The book was out on time, but given more time I certainly could have
done a lot better job. Errors might have crept into the process, but I
tried to keep the captions "within my base of knowledge". We all have a few
misconceptions from time to time, the learning process is ongoing for
everyone.
Payment for a weeks work? A free copy of the book, and the feeling
you helped record history. This is pretty typical. I wrote the freight car
section for a well known PRR book back in 1993 and got the same constant
harassment from its editor. In the end I cut off the effort at the forth
rewrite of the text. I have my free book, and the feeling I did as good a job
as I could while working 10 hours days, six days a week at a hard outside
job. (I can see Bruce Smith running to his book shelf to figure out which
book it was!)
Is possibly a rule of thumb that the more the captioner gets for his
work, the less likely it will be right? Most of us do this for the love of
it yet.
Rich Burg
**************Huge savings on HDTVs from Dell.com!
( http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100126575x1221836042x1201399880/aol?redir=http:%2F%2Fad.doubleclick.ne
t%2Fclk%3B215073686%3B37034322%3Bb)

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Join main@RealSTMFC.groups.io to automatically receive all group messages.