Re: NEWSPRINT


Paul <buygone@...>
 

Tim:



The forklift had its own transport and did not follow each load to the
plant; it stayed at the unloading dock until all cars were unloaded. This
forklift had pneumatic tires not the hard rubber tire that most people think
of when thinking of a forklift. At the Times plant they had their own
lift which unloaded the rolls from the trucks rolled them on their side and
placed them on a set of tracks which allowed them to roll down into the
basement for storage or placement on one of the presses. The rolls were
around 4.5 feet in diameter and weighted about 8,000 lbs each if my memory
is working.



Paul C. Koehler



_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Tim
O'Connor
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2009 12:18 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] NEWSPRINT





Paul

Thanks. Once the truck was full, where did they put the fork lift? :-)

It's not newsprint, but a local box company here stores huge rolls
of brown craft paper outdoors, in the weather. The rolls look like
they weigh many tons. How big was a newsprint roll in the 1950's?

Tim

At 12/31/2009 02:15 AM Thursday, you wrote:
Tim:

Nothing special just a concrete dock with no cover. Rolls were normally
loaded eye to the sky and the trucker in this case Bundren would bring a
fork lift with a roll clamp. Unload the cars, transfer to their trucks, and
deliver to the Times.

Paul



_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> com
[mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> com] On Behalf
Of Tim
O'Connor
Sent: Wednesday, December 30, 2009 8:48 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] NEWSPRINT





Paul

It sounds like from your description and Andy's that if there
was a specially equipped unloading dock then paper rolls could be
transloaded. But that's far from the suggestion of spotting a
load of newsprint at a "team track". The paper I read in NJ as a
teen (Courier-Post) had no rail service either, so it must have
come from a PRR/PRSL unloading site nearby.

Tim O'Connor

Tim:
Not entirely true. The LA Times does not have a direct rail siding. Most
of the newsprint was received at the Southern Pacific's 8th Street paper
dock and trucked to the Times paper plant. They also received a portion
via
water at the LA Harbor and that newsprint was also trucked to them.

Paul C. Koehler

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