Re: Milling in Transit


Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Jeff;

I am glad we got a more expert opinion. I am now hoping that someone can
direct us to some photos of the loading and unloading operations, so I can
finally do the bakery on my layout! They had a small retail storefront, a
large baking operation behind (2 stories), and a small siding out back. They
did not ship out by rail, but supplied product all over the area, under a
different name on the bag. I'd love to know if they got other raw materials
by rail.

I am also hoping that anyone that is interested could also supply some more
details about how they also did the unloading part at larger breweries,
pre-big-covered hopper days. I only saw it after they had changed over, and
it was clearly a between-the-tracks chute, over which they parked the hopper.
How the heck did they do it prior to that? Shovel the barley out the door
inside a building? It looks like it, as there were tracks into the
buildings, but it would be cool to know.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Aley,
Jeff A
Sent: Friday, April 16, 2010 11:41 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Milling in Transit



Elden,

Thanks for expanding my knowledge about this. I really enjoy learning more
about grain and flour operations.

Regards,

-Jeff

From: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of
Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Friday, April 16, 2010 4:51 AM
To: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Milling in Transit

Jeff;

I don't know if it was common, but I have seen an awful lot of cars with
powdered flour all over them, like a powdered doughnut almost. I once asked a
guy that worked in a bakery (a BIG one), and he says he worked a summer in
which he shoveled out box cars of flour into a conveyor. I trust the story
was true. I also knew a guy that worked for National Biscuit company (Nabisco
in Pgh), and he said that in the days before the big covered hoppers came on
the scene, they got flour that way.

Can you imagine how contaminated that flour was? Yuck.

Elden Gatwood

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Sent: Thursday, April 15, 2010 4:58 PM
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Subject: RE: [STMFC] Milling in Transit

Elden,

Was this common? I thought flour was shipped in barrels or sacks, and not
loose, in bulk, in boxcars.

Regards,

-Jeff

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Subject: RE: [STMFC] Milling in Transit

For the modelers, there are number of great Paul Winters photos of box cars
with doors open, on RIP or clean-out tracks, with the intact or remains of
grain doors, waiting for them to be restored to general service condition,
coated with flour, including over the door where the spout was located. It
appears that the grain doors were just as good for holding in the flour, as
they were for grain, and were only removed after the car finished the trip to
the flour end user/Wholesaler/bakery and was routed back into a yard for
clean out. It makes an extremely interesting modeling aspect.

Elden Gatwood

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Subject: [STMFC] Milling in Transit

Dennis,

Could you please expand upon this topic?

For example, who is it that has his wheat milled in transit: the farmer, or
some intermediate elevator? Is the "milling in transit" done between the
grain elevator and flour consumer (e.g. bakery)?

You imply that the exact same boxcar gets used for the flour as was used for
the grain. Is this always the case, or was that a simplification?

Thanks much,

-Jeff

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Subject: [STMFC] Re: was LCL - Stop Off traffic

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<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Ross

I've heard of storage in transit for grain, but milling in transit??
Wouldn't the transformation of bulk grain into bags of flour involve
an entirely new tariff?

Tim O'Connor
No, it was a single tariff designed to keep the flour traffic on the line
that had originated the grain move. It goes back a long way; here's a link to
a nespaper article from 1890:

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9802EED8153BE533A25752C1A9629C
<http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9802EED8153BE533A25752C1A9629
C>
<http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9802EED8153BE533A25752C1A9629
<http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9802EED8153BE533A25752C1A9629
C>
94619ED7CF
<http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9802EED8153BE533A25752C1A9629
<http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9802EED8153BE533A25752C1A9629
<http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9802EED8153BE533A25752C1A9629
<http://query.nytimes.com/gst/abstract.html?res=9802EED8153BE533A25752C1A9629

C94619ED7CF>

Keep in mind that grain is fungible, like money is. When you go to the bank
to make a withdrawal, you don't get the same money you deposited back; you
get different but equal money. Grain is the same, you don't get your grain
back out of the elevator, you get different but equal grain. Same with
milling in transit. You don't get the flour that was milled from the grain
you hauled in; you get equal flour milled from different grain. So, the car
just emptied of grain can be immediately refilled with flour and sent on its
way.

Dennis



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