Re: model car weight


Tim O'Connor
 

Gary

What I meant was is that you can't draw many useful conclusions
from a test of two wheelsets in one truck -- to find the best
performance you have try many different combinations of trucks,
car weights, wheelsets, etc. If I got the results that your
friend did, my probable conclusion would be that the combination
of that particular metal wheelset in that particular truck on
that particular car wasn't any good! :-)

For the last couple of years I've been roll testing each car
as the "last step" after construction. I get all kinds of results
but I almost always find a combination that works well. I've been
surprised by how well Proto 2000 trucks and wheels roll -- and how
badly some others do. Tahoe trucks are consistently the best of
the best.

Tim O'Connor

In his rollability testing, Brian used the same box car with the same
trucks, swapping out the wheelsets for the tests. So the only variable was
the wheelsets themselves.

gary roe
quincy, illinois

_____

Sent: Wednesday, July 21, 2010 5:48 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: model car weight

Gary

A lot of factors influence performance - metal or plastic, sintered or
machined metal, machined brass or machined nickel silver, dirt or oil on
the track, pointed or shoulder journals, fat taper or narrow taper, metal
or abs or delrin sideframes, equalized vs nonequalized, sprung or
unsprung...
But all else being equal, my experience is that metal wheels outlast and
outperform plastic wheels by a huge margin in HO scale. If you think about
the physics of wheels on rails, the weight of an N scale car per square
centimeter of rail contact is far less than it is for HO scale cars, so
direct performance comparisons are not meaningful between N and HO scales
(or between HO and O, or O scale and 1:1)

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