Re: livestock shipments


Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 6, 2010, at 6:05 AM, Douglas Harding wrote:

Tom, let me speculate: the CGW saw potential loads if they could
provide
cars. Their stockcars dated from the teens or 20's and were worn
out or
rotting away. The CGW had surplus single sheathed wood boxcars as they
upgraded to steel boxcars. Tax laws made it affordable to convert the
surplus boxcars into needed stockcars.
A plausible speculation, Doug, with one exception: by the 1950s, the
tax laws no longer made it advantageous to rebuild older cars rather
than buying new ones. However, the practice of replacing oder, worn
out livestock cars with cars converted from obsolete box cars was
almost universal in the railroad industry after World War II, and
widespread even in the 1930s. Hardly any new stock cars were built;
older box cars had ample capacity, both in weight and cubic feet, to
meet the need for stock cars and were easy and economical to
convert. Railroads that followed that practice included the Santa
Fe, Great Northern, Union Pacific, Chicago & Northwestern, Rio
Grande, Rock Island, New York Central, Grand Trunk Western, Western
Pacific, and doubtless a bunch of others that don't come immediately
to mind.

Richard Hendrickson

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