Date   

Re: Another color image: Sacramento museum HO WP 1916 built 40' SS box car

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Andy and Friends,

Is the stripped car WP 75895, the car CSRM restored and displayed outside the museum, or is it another survivor? I know it would be neat to have an example of one of the original 1916 boxcars, but the stock car was equally significant.

Attached are photos of 75895 (I think!) as I found it in West Sacramento on the SN about 1977 while awaiting movement to the CSRM, and later as it was displayed. The double-sheathed boxcar is SN 2350, which also went to the CSRM.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 11:19 PM Andy Carlson <midcentury@...> wrote:
Sacramento has a stripped of wood slats stock car. This stock car was built by the WP from rebuilt donor box cars of this subject.
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I toyed with making a burned out HO car with one of these resin ends. This is my 1st attempt.

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-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Another color image: Sacramento museum HO WP 1916 built 40' SS box car

Andy Carlson
 

Sacramento has a stripped of wood slats stock car. This stock car was built by the WP from rebuilt donor box cars of this subject.
Inline image


I toyed with making a burned out HO car with one of these resin ends. This is my 1st attempt.

Inline image


-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA
_._,_._,_


Re: Another color image: HO WP 1916 built 40' SS box car resin parts

Randy Hees
 

We have one of these, believed to be 2711 (as a work car) at Nevada State Railroad Museum, Boulder City... ours is believed to be last used as a rider car in the Elko wreck train... as such the end have been moved inward 2' or so creating platforms... windows were cut into the sides, and a water tank was added... Later it went to the tourist railroad at Heber Ut where the upper sheeting was cut away, making it a tourist rider car.   We acquired it in a "lot" of equipment in 1993... and it has sat until this year.  This year we have cleaned it up, replaced the arch bar trucks it was on when received with a set of cast steel caboose trucks, serviced and tested the brakes... It has a couple of burnt bearings which need to be rebabitted then it will return to service on our railroad.

Randy Hees


SOLD: HO WP 1916 built 40' SS box car resin parts

Andy Carlson
 

These two casting sets for the WP 40' SS box cars has been sold. Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA






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Re: AB Brake Set

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Thanks Todd And Andy:

I have always used Cal Scale brass castings for my AB brakes.  Looking at the4se I may save myself some drilling and soldering time.

Next to identify some doors and ends.

Bill Pardie




On Sep 23, 2020, at 3:49 PM, Todd Sullivan via groups.io <sullivant41@...> wrote:

Could be Grandt Line, more likely Detail Associates, I think.  Hang on to them, as they are the best AB sets you can find.

Todd Sullivan


Re: Using Pledge (Future)

Jim Betz
 

  OK, I have to admit my "dirty little secret".  I don't consider it important - at all - to
use any kind of "prep" for decals.  I float my decals on using just distilled water.
Then I wick off the extra.  Then I apply Solvaset and wick it off (using small pieces
of tissue held in tweezers).  Let it dry (mostly).  Reapply more Solvaset and wick
off the extra.  Let it dry (again - mostly).  Use a pin to prick the surface of the
decal (round headed sewing pin).  Reapply Solvaset and wick.  Let it dry.
And "done".  Let it dry - FULLY.  Use pure - distilled - water to clean up any
residue from the Solvaset.  Really DONE.  Yes, I use the same process for
all decal brands.
  Your methods may vary.  Mine work for me.  
                                                                                                       - Jim


Re: AB Brake Set

Todd Sullivan
 

Could be Grandt Line, more likely Detail Associates, I think.  Hang on to them, as they are the best AB sets you can find.

Todd Sullivan


Re: GN 50 footer

Rich C
 

Great looking car, Clark
Rich Christie


AB Brake Set

WILLIAM PARDIE
 


I was going through my “clutter” today and came up with a packed of AB brake sets.  They include three housings and all other components except for the brake wheels/. I believe they are Grandt line but can anyone confirm this and identify the three brake housings?

Thanks:

Bill Pardie


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone



Re: Central Valley Stock Car Roof Ideas

Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 04:53 PM, Garth Groff and Sally Sanford wrote:
Comments, suggestions, other possible projects (I have two of the stock car kits; sorry, but I don't want to sell them at this time).
 
Garth,
The problem is it's an excellent model of a very rare roof, which means it's easy to identify where it DOESN'T belong, which is most everywhere. The roof was patented by a Mr. Robertson, Master Car Builder for the Northern Pacific and he attempted to market it, but to my knowledge The Soo Line was the only road to buy. This is NOT a solid steel roof, but rather an outside metal roof designed to be supported by wood sheathing; in fact the details of the sheathing are the gist of the patent, the metal is only an incidental covering. The feature that gives this away are the cast clasps at the end of the seam caps, which were attached by screws to a wood fascia. The NP used this roof on numerous classes of box, stock, and refrigerator cars. The Soo used it on four groups of their distinctive "sawtooth" boxcars, and ten milk cars that look like express reefers. That's it. It doesn't really belong on any all steel car; too early.

Dennis Storzek
 


Re: Another color image: HO WP 1916 built 40' SS box car resin parts

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Eric, 

No Pullman, WP 15001-16000. A few hung on into the 1960s, mostly in plaster service out of Gerlach, Nevada, as series 26001-26125. Many were converted to stock cars, MW service, and the WP's famous single-sheathed cupola and bay-window cabooses. None are known to survive in original condition, but a mess of the cabooses are still around in preservation, on tourist railroads, and in use as vacation cabins.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Wed, Sep 23, 2020 at 7:34 PM Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:
Were these Bettendorf-built cars?


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Sep 23, 2020, at 6:21 PM, Andy Carlson <midcentury@...> wrote:





Hello-

I have been preparing a return to offering a select few resin HO box cars. The tooling for this HO box car was made over 20 years ago.

I have enough parts for two of these WP box cars.



I accept checks or money orders. With a small fee I accept PayPal.

Contact me at <midcentury@...> of list please.


<Screen Shot 2020-09-23 at 3.54.10 PM.png>

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Central Valley Stock Car Roof Ideas

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

I've been toying with some parts and unfinished kits in my stash this evening. I have little use for the Central Valley NP stock car kit, but have been examining the arched roof for possible use on other projects. The roof is rather wide at its extreme overhang, but the distance of 9 scale feet over the two ridges that project down into the car body is very close to the width on Red Caboose or Intermountain roofs AAR roofs I have in my stash. The stock car kits ends are a very close match in width to the ends on the F&C 1932 steel boxcar. I'm thinking the stock car roof might work for one of the C&O ARA boxcars that had radial roofs. The overhang might be trimmed back, or I could slice it down the middle and after some file work put the pieces back together. New ribs I suppose, but that's not all that difficult.

And what to do with the rest of the stock car? Well, it might get me chased off this group, but I might be able to drop an Intermountain roof onto the stock car body to make a freelanced car for my Virginia Midland. 

Comments, suggestions, other possible projects (I have two of the stock car kits; sorry, but I don't want to sell them at this time).

As if I don't have enough unfinished projects.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


Re: Another color image: HO WP 1916 built 40' SS box car resin parts

Eric Hansmann
 

Were these Bettendorf-built cars?


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Sep 23, 2020, at 6:21 PM, Andy Carlson <midcentury@...> wrote:





Hello-

I have been preparing a return to offering a select few resin HO box cars. The tooling for this HO box car was made over 20 years ago.

I have enough parts for two of these WP box cars.



I accept checks or money orders. With a small fee I accept PayPal.

Contact me at <midcentury@...> of list please.


<Screen Shot 2020-09-23 at 3.54.10 PM.png>

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Another color image: HO WP 1916 built 40' SS box car resin parts

Andy Carlson
 





Hello-

I have been preparing a return to offering a select few resin HO box cars. The tooling for this HO box car was made over 20 years ago.

I have enough parts for two of these WP box cars.



I accept checks or money orders. With a small fee I accept PayPal.

Contact me at <midcentury@...> of list please.


Inline image

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Offered: HO WP 1916 built 40' SS box car resin parts

Andy Carlson
 

Hello-

I have been preparing a return to offering a select few resin HO box cars. The tooling for this HO box car was made over 20 years ago.

I have enough parts for two of these WP box cars.

The buyer will get the following parts for two cars:

4 SS sides
2 plain ends
2 ends with lumber doors
2 roofs (Newly re-tooled to correct drawing errors)
Several roof support cross ties
2 underframes
2 sets of underframe cross members and cross ties

The sides will need to be warmed up to correct a slight inward curvature

Because of the sides I am reducing the price for these 2 cars.
Purchase both cars with shipping for $85.00

No paint, decals, trucks brake equipment are included.
I have just the two to be offered and are sold as a pair.

I accept checks or money orders. With a small fee I accept PayPal.

Contact me at <midcentury@...> of list please.





Re: Using Pledge (Future)

james murrie
 

I've used it for many years to do things like gluing windows in rail cars.  Works like any white glue, but flows great and doesn't show where it hit the "glass".
Jim Murrie


Weathering interiors

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Group;

 

And more, note how different cars of the same RR and class looked.  The end result in that your cars should look different.  Especially hoppers and gondolas.

 

That bluish cast in that H21A is real.  I remember that very well from my years crawling around inside these cars.  It is not just the last load they carried, it was the abrasion down to bare steel.

 

We could engage in endless speculation, but this is the proof.

 

Elden Gatwood


Re: Question about weathering

Tony Thompson
 

      I have a fairly extensive and well illustrated description of using acrylic washes, in what are called "Reference pages" on my blog. They are found in the upper right corner of each blog post. Here is a link to Part 1, which is the basics (there is also a Part 2 with more advanced and more detailed aspects):


I continue to rely primarily on this method, with assists from artist's color pencils and Pan-Pastels for added effects.

Tony Thompson




Re: Using Pledge (Future)

Rob & Bev Manley
 

Ken,
I have been using Pledge for about 30 years as my gloss coat prior to decaling. It works well with acrylic paints and makes decaling a breeze. Some times it might show a muddiness in the target area but it will go away. Much like white glue turns clear. I have a nickel plated Oriental Twin Cities Zephyr and 2 E-7s that I used it on and the finish has never cracked or failed. You can even cut the Future with a little Silver to tone down the shiny plating as shown in an old Mainline Modeler article by Bob Kosic. He didn't use Future, I did. 
Another use is to attach Photo Etch parts by using a small artist watercolor brush. It worked great on my Genesis Farr air filter grills. It is an acrylic product and has some flexibility, unlike ACC. 
Use full strength in your airbrush and don't lay it on too thick as it will run. If you notice this, take it to the sink and scrub the model with a toothbrush and Windex. So yes, no thinning required. 
The military guys say you can add Talcum to it to make your own Flat finish. I haven't tried that.

Sincerely,
Rob Manley
"Better modeling through personal embarrassment"


On Wednesday, September 23, 2020, 11:29:22 AM CDT, Ken Adams <smadanek44g@...> wrote:


I have even been known to use it on my Pergo floors without harm. Let us hope that J&J never tries to "improve" it in our lifetimes...
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek


Re: Question about weathering

Rob & Bev Manley
 

Ray,
Ten years ago I was on a mission to find the ultimate weathering product. I liked chalks but didn't like the vanishing act they perform when overcoated with a flat finish. By the way my favorite Flats are Scalecoat, Model Master and......Windsor Newton Galleria Acrylic Flat in the 8oz. bottle for about $8.00. At Blick art store I walked into this PanPastel display. I was intrigued by their Oxide Red color and about 6 others. Bev would only let me buy one because she knew I had tried powders, chalks and others with little happiness. Unlike other modelers I picked up my Central Valley NP stock car, not a Bluebox boxcar, and attacked the roof. It was everything I wanted. easy application and professional looking color. 
The only weathering product I know of that is forgiving and mostly removable is Pan Pastel. I say "mostly" because White painted models will show a ghost of the color when removed. 
Pan Pastel is a high grade Artist product made of mostly pigment with a binder added, 96 colors plus a "Colorless Blender" that allows you to tone down the color to more of a tint. You need a good Flat finish on the model first and can apply with their SofftTools applicators, Micro-Brushes or artist oil brushes for tight spaces.
I have been doing RPM clinics on these for years and also have a Blog on their website for us modelers.
Modelingcolors.com
There are quite a few and at the bottom of the pages is a note to click on for more. Pan Pastel is also usable likw a water based product. You can apply to wood and use as a stain. It mixes well with watercolor pencils like the Derwent brand. 
Honestly, it's the only thing I use now. My airbrush is only for painting and flat finishing. You have the option of using a Flat to protect the Pan Pastels from heavy handling or not. I stopped using an overcoat and I am always taking y rolling stock in and out of my A-Line carrying trays. I haven't noticed any significant loss of color. 
When applying the color you should put some pressure on the applicator, that helps it bond to the surface.
Thank you for allowing me to share this.
Attached is a Rock Island B-unit that I matched to a fodo from
 Fallenflags.com
The CB&Q gondola is a mandatory freight car WIP content. This shows how to use Pan Pastel as a stain.

Sincerely,
Rob Manley
"Better modeling through personal embarrassment"


On Wednesday, September 23, 2020, 12:12:41 PM CDT, Aley, Jeff A <jeff.a.aley@...> wrote:


Brianna, it seems, independently discovered one of the corollaries to Murphy’s Law: “There are two kinds of dirt – the dark kind, which is attracted to light objects, and the light kind, which is attracted to dark objects.”

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bruce Smith
Sent: Wednesday, September 23, 2020 7:43 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Question about weathering

 

Ray, Jim,

 

Additional commentary interspersed ;)

 

On Sep 23, 2020, at 9:21 AM, Jim Betz <jimbetz@...> wrote:

 

  2) Darker colors on the roof and lighter colors on the bottom.

 

As a rule of thumb, everything goes towards a mid-tone. Brianna, my daughter, and I gave a clinic at an SER NMRA annual convention when she was the tender age of 5. She had many things to contribute, but perhaps the most seminal was “If it is light, make it darker, and if it is dark, make it lighter”.  BTW, the old theater adage “don’t work with children and animals” is entirely true. Brianna stole the show. 

 

And no pressure, but if a 5-year old can weather cars, so can you ;)



  3) Cars sit more than they move - a lot more.  So any "streaks"
       need to be vertical rather than horizontal.

 

Except passenger cars and head end cars, which may have a more all-over weathering pattern, with some horizontal aspects. Locomotives also have patterns that both relate to gravity and movement.



  5) A final light dusting with an air brush helps a lot - I call this the
      "blending coat" - I usually use a very thin "weathered black" color
      for this but have also used just dullcoat and other such.

 

Vary this color to vary your weathering. Alternative are Harbor Mist Grey, Railroad tie brown, 



  6) Weathered equipment is never "shiny".

 

In real life, some equipment can retain a shine, whilst being weathered. However, I have never found that gloss looks anything but “toy-like” on a model, even if the prototype was shiny.



 10) Rust is a job best done sparingly.

 

And remember that there are infinite shades of rust.

 

P.S. There are many different 'methods' - I prefer acrylic washes.

        Some guys prefer pan pastels.  Some guys like to do it all
        using an air brush (I consider this to be the least successful).
        In the end you will develop your own 'process'.  Don't forget
        to vary what you do from car to car - such as the shade of
        this coat, how much of a particular coat you use, what order
        you do different steps, etc.

 

I try to use different methods to mix things up to avoid the everything looks the same problem, but also to build skills with different media. 

 

Regards

Bruce

 

Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."