Date   

Re: Photo: Soldiers Unloading NYC Boxcar (1917)

Ray Breyer
 

This is 1917: officers were always armed when around "scum", and sergeants usually carried stout sticks.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL



On Thursday, May 13, 2021, 06:06:49 PM CDT, Chad Rogers <chadshobbies@...> wrote:


When I was in service & assigned to duty as a Battalion Armorer when transporting weapons &/or ammunition or other sensitive items we were to carry a firearm, typically a pistol. Perhaps similar. Back then could also be money shipments for payday activities or whatever they called it back then. 

Be well,

Chad C. Rogers
Jefferson City, Tenn. USA

On May 13, 2021, at 16:43, SamClarke via groups.io <samc@...> wrote:



Tony and group,

 

I noticed the guy standing next to the wagon, perhaps an officer with his back to us, is wearing a sidearm, must be a rowdy group (18-19 of them) or a high crime area?

 

Maybe he’s the only one the Army trusts with a gun…

 

 

Sam Clarke

R&D / Tech Advisor / Artist

Kadee Quality Products Co.

mail@...

541-826-3883

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

?


Re: Another X29 Question -- Coupler Operating Release Levers

Jim and Barbara van Gaasbeek
 

Aha!  Thanks Dennis.

 

Jim van Gaasbeek

Irvine, CA

 

 

 

 


Re: Photo: Soldiers Unloading NYC Boxcar (1917)

Chad Rogers
 

When I was in service & assigned to duty as a Battalion Armorer when transporting weapons &/or ammunition or other sensitive items we were to carry a firearm, typically a pistol. Perhaps similar. Back then could also be money shipments for payday activities or whatever they called it back then. 

Be well,

Chad C. Rogers
Jefferson City, Tenn. USA

On May 13, 2021, at 16:43, SamClarke via groups.io <samc@...> wrote:



Tony and group,

 

I noticed the guy standing next to the wagon, perhaps an officer with his back to us, is wearing a sidearm, must be a rowdy group (18-19 of them) or a high crime area?

 

Maybe he’s the only one the Army trusts with a gun…

 

 

Sam Clarke

R&D / Tech Advisor / Artist

Kadee Quality Products Co.

mail@...

541-826-3883

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

?


Thrall circus flat cars

Larry Smith
 

In 1947 RB&BB needed new flat cars for their fleet.  With Warren and Mt. Vernon out of the business, they turned to Thrall and purchased 5 cars.  When the circus changed over to longer cars, they got rid of the Thrall cars with two of them going to Strates.  Because of the small numbers of prototype cars built, of course there won't be a commercial model produced, so I will need to scratch build the two cars.  Does anyone know where I can get plans for these cars or at least the dimensions for them.  I do have a couple of pictures of them and could guesstimate, but prefer the plans.

Larry Smith 


Re: Photo: Soldiers Unloading NYC Boxcar (1917)

Frank Pearsall
 

Good afternoon all:

He is wearing boots, so he’s an officer. The other soldiers are wearing leggings.

Frank Pearsall
Brevard, N.C.

On May 13, 2021, at 4:43 PM, SamClarke via groups.io <samc@...> wrote:

Tony and group, 
 
I noticed the guy standing next to the wagon, perhaps an officer with his back to us, is wearing a sidearm, must be a rowdy group (18-19 of them) or a high crime area?
 
Maybe he’s the only one the Army trusts with a gun…
 
 
Sam Clarke
R&D / Tech Advisor / Artist
Kadee Quality Products Co.
541-826-3883
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Re: Photo: Soldiers Unloading NYC Boxcar (1917)

SamClarke
 

Tony and group,

 

I noticed the guy standing next to the wagon, perhaps an officer with his back to us, is wearing a sidearm, must be a rowdy group (18-19 of them) or a high crime area?

 

Maybe he’s the only one the Army trusts with a gun…

 

 

Sam Clarke

R&D / Tech Advisor / Artist

Kadee Quality Products Co.

mail@...

541-826-3883

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

?


Re: ACL Freight Car Color

Brian Shumaker
 
Edited

John,
I am really only interested in replicating the O-21 class car as seen in the pic. I may also do an O-23 class as it is nearly the same but built by ACF with Youngstown doors and different trucks. I like Fenton’s O-24 50 footer. I have no info on O-22 and I know O-25’s are single door. I’d appreciate any photos of either O-21 or O-23, though.
Thanks!
Brian Shumaker


Re: ACL Freight Car Color

golden1014
 

Hey Brian, almost all of the ACL O-20, 21, 22, 23, 24 and 25 cars had Union Duplex rollers. Most of the auto cars had seven-foot doors.  So be careful—you may have a lot of scratchbuilding ahead.  I can send details and photos if you have car numbers.

John Golden


Re: B&O boxcar decals was Re: ACL Freight Car Color

O Fenton Wells
 

I used Speedwitch, (now, National Scale Car).  They are not correct for the M 59 but a bit of cutting and pasting they are wonderful.


On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 2:41 PM Jim Ogden <sjogden@...> wrote:
Great work!  I love the way you take the CB&T bodies and bring them into the 21st century.  The weathering is just the right amount to make the details pop.

 I’m curious as to the best decals for this style of B&O lettering.

Jim Ogden
Argyle, Texas







--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: ACL Freight Car Color

O Fenton Wells
 

True the photo I used was from 1958, I think


On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 2:37 PM Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:
Brian Shumaker wrote:

 I assume by 1959 the “Automobile” is a misnomer and it was used as a lumber, appliance and such hauler. 

Not really. The AAR did drop, about 1955, its "standard" nomenclature that any double-door box car was classified as "automobile" regardless of cargoes carried, but a number of roads continued to so letter double-door cars. And I certainly doubt anyone rushed to paint out the word "automobile" after 1955.

Tony Thompson





--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: ACL Freight Car Color

O Fenton Wells
 

Thanks Scott


On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 3:11 PM Scott <repairman87@...> wrote:
Wow Fenton those are great looking cars.

Scott McDonald 



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: automobile box cars (was ACL Freight Car Color)

Tim O'Connor
 


Check the XMR column of the "special type cars" circular that is published in the ORER.

In 1963, it still shows

 ATSF - 69 cars in 6 series
 B&O - 360 cars in 6 series
   CN - 977 cars in 2 series
 
and so on and so forth ...

So even though most cars lost their "automobile" stencils (when they ever had them to begin with)
there were still a lot of box cars capable of transporting automobiles in interior racks throughout the
1950's and even later. The SP still had well over 1,000 XMR box cars in 1963!

Tim O'Connor



On 5/13/2021 2:37 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:
Brian Shumaker wrote:

 I assume by 1959 the “Automobile” is a misnomer and it was used as a lumber, appliance and such hauler. 

Not really. The AAR did drop, about 1955, its "standard" nomenclature that any double-door box car was classified as "automobile" regardless of cargoes carried, but a number of roads continued to so letter double-door cars. And I certainly doubt anyone rushed to paint out the word "automobile" after 1955.

Tony Thompson

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: ACL Freight Car Color

Scott
 

Wow Fenton those are great looking cars.

Scott McDonald 


Re: Another X29 Question -- Coupler Operating Release Levers

Dennis Storzek
 

On Thu, May 13, 2021 at 11:39 AM, Jim and Barbara van Gaasbeek wrote:
Being ignorant of this matter, I’m not sure how a bottom-operated coupler actually worked.  In a top-operated coupler, gravity kept the pin in place, and one had to overcome friction to pull it.  With a bottom-operated coupler, how was the pin retained?  Obviously, gravity would help overcome any friction in pulling that pin.
The locking pin is the same, it's just pushed up from the bottom.


Re: Photo: Soldiers Unloading NYC Boxcar (1917)

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparrowrote:

Photo: Soldiers Unloading NYC Boxcar (1917)
A photo from the Wisconsin Historical Society:
Partial car number is 20053.

Of course most of them are having fun sitting on the car roofs, not helping with the unloading.

Tony Thompson




B&O boxcar decals was Re: ACL Freight Car Color

Jim Ogden
 

Great work! I love the way you take the CB&T bodies and bring them into the 21st century. The weathering is just the right amount to make the details pop.

I’m curious as to the best decals for this style of B&O lettering.

Jim Ogden
Argyle, Texas


Re: Another X29 Question -- Coupler Operating Release Levers

Jim and Barbara van Gaasbeek
 

Being ignorant of this matter, I’m not sure how a bottom-operated coupler actually worked.  In a top-operated coupler, gravity kept the pin in place, and one had to overcome friction to pull it.  With a bottom-operated coupler, how was the pin retained?  Obviously, gravity would help overcome any friction in pulling that pin.

 

Jim van Gaasbeek

Irvine, CA

 

 


Re: ACL Freight Car Color

Tony Thompson
 

Brian Shumaker wrote:

 I assume by 1959 the “Automobile” is a misnomer and it was used as a lumber, appliance and such hauler. 

Not really. The AAR did drop, about 1955, its "standard" nomenclature that any double-door box car was classified as "automobile" regardless of cargoes carried, but a number of roads continued to so letter double-door cars. And I certainly doubt anyone rushed to paint out the word "automobile" after 1955.

Tony Thompson




Re: Another X29 Question -- Coupler Operating Release Levers

Schleigh Mike
 

Perfect, Jack!!!!

This is exactly what I suspected.  NO GOOD after a particular date.Thanks for this confirmation.

Regards----Mike Schleigh

On Thursday, May 13, 2021, 01:59:27 PM EDT, Jack Mullen <jack.f.mullen@...> wrote:


Mike, 
AAR interchange rules required rotary coupler operating levers on cars built new or rebuilt effective 8/1/33. That ended new applications of Carmer levers. I don't know of any interchange ban, but long after the time of this list, the 40/50 year rules would weed out cars still having them. Some lasted a very long time - last one I saw was on a C&NW flat in MofW service sometime in the first decade of the current century. The car would have been about 75-80 years old, and probably didn't last much longer.

The advantage of a Carmer lever is that the operator uses a pushing motion and can apply body weight rather than just muscle force. However, if the lever breaks, hand slips, or he loses footing, he's likely to fall between cars. Not a good outcome. I think the risks of foot operation are obvious.  Evidently, if these risks were considered at the time, they weren't great enough to cause a ban, but may have been a factor in ending new applications and gradual replacement.
Besides the cost of the Carmer parts vs. what is basically a bent steel rod, the proliferation of different patterns of Carmer levers (Pennsy alone had a bunch) must have been a maintenance PITA.
Type E or F couplers can be either top or bottom operated.
Bottom operation is said to require less force on the operating lever than top operation. That implies less risk of injury.

Jack Mullen


Re: Another X29 Question -- Coupler Operating Release Levers

steve_wintner
 

This is speculation, but i wonder if icing up was less of a problem with bottom operated couplers. 

Steve

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