Date   

Re: Corroded hoppers (UNCLASSIFIED)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

It would be interesting to know how geographic/regional this issue was, and
how it evolved over time. I recall seeing discussion on effects of corrosion
early in the twentieth century, but the issue for my time period (late 20th
C) seems to have been overshadowed by the effects of overloading or over-use
rather than corrosion-induced failure. Perhaps this was from the use of
better steel, or just that corrosion was not that much of an issue relating
to the coal found in my area of the country.

That being said, I remember seeing corrosion on the slope sheets and lower
insides, of many hoppers I personally climbed into, but it never appeared to
have been the cause of failure of either, and sorry, I did not take photos of
it, either.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
rwitt_2000
Sent: Monday, May 23, 2011 4:30 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Corroded hoppers



Richard Townsend wrote:

I am looking for photos of steam era hoppers with corroded slope
sheets and bottom sheets as a result of hauling (high-sulfur) coal or sulfur.
Anybody know of any?
Richard,

I know of two seminal articles about steel freight used by the B&ORR that
have illustrations of corrosion to early open-top cars; hoppers and gondolas
used in coal service. The first article discusses B&O gondolas class O-12,
O-14, and O-17, and hoppers class N-8, N-9, N-10 and N-10A.
It describes and illustrates the types of failures and the "repairs"
made to to "fix" the problems. The second articles mostly describes the
failures to the B&O class W-1 (similar to the PRR H21) and how these coke
hoppers were repaired and rebuilt in 1923. It especially notes that copper
bearing steel showed less corrosion. Both articles describe corrosion damage
to steel cars that were in service for 7 to 10 years.

1. Maintenance and Repair of Steel Freight Cars, Baltimore & Ohio Railroad,
American Engineer and Railroad Journal (became Railway Locomotive & Cars),
vol. 81, p. 161, May 1907, (18 page article).

2.Reducing the Corrosion in Steel Cars, Steel containing a small percentage
of copper adopted to prevent rapid deterioration, J.J. Tatum, Superintendent
Car Department, Baltimore & Ohio, Railway Mechanical Engineer, vol. 97, no.
7, July 1923, pp.413-416.

If you have access to a large university engineering library you should be
able to locate these two articles. I haven't checked recently, but PDFs of
some railroad journals are in Google Books.

I would offer to copy these articles for you, but my copies are from 45 years
ago when copy machines could not copy half-tone photographs in journals so a
second generation copy would be unreadable.

I hope this helps. This has been discussed in the past on this list so
possibly others have better copies of these articles.

Regards,

Bob Witt





Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


Re: Why not model actual train consists?

al_brown03
 

This amounts to assuming that the cars in your consists are representative of those in your modelled territory. Given a large enough data sample, that assumption may be good, although some pitfalls have been pointed out in this thread. (Two examples: [1] "Your" conductor may have worked only certain trains; [2] photographs obviously over-represent daytime trains, and may also over-represent trains doing something photogenic, e.g. climbing a grade.) Proceed, but with caution, I'd say.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Jim Betz <jimbetz@...> wrote:

Hi,

The flurry of responses has started to wind down. They are
all well thought out and great. Thanks.

So here's an update to my suggestion:

The major 'flaw' in my suggestion is that if you model
specific consists you will end up with ops that are 'boring'
(over time) ... unless you have a fleet that is much larger
than the normal layout. I agree with this.

So what if your -fleet- is modeled based on actual train
consists ... but you don't use those consists for your ops -
or if you do use them duirng ops you only do so on a few
trains or only on "special occasions"?
- Jim


Re: Why not model actual train consists?

Jim Betz
 

Hi,

The flurry of responses has started to wind down. They are
all well thought out and great. Thanks.

So here's an update to my suggestion:

The major 'flaw' in my suggestion is that if you model
specific consists you will end up with ops that are 'boring'
(over time) ... unless you have a fleet that is much larger
than the normal layout. I agree with this.

So what if your -fleet- is modeled based on actual train
consists ... but you don't use those consists for your ops -
or if you do use them duirng ops you only do so on a few
trains or only on "special occasions"?
- Jim


Re: Reading Box Car

rwitt_2000
 

Al Brown wrote:

Wow, what a beauty! Check out the fishbelly underframe, unusual arch
bar trucks, and Youngstown replacement door.
Looking at the photograph and the drawings again, it appears that this
Reading boxcar also has a replacement roof. It looks like a Hutchins.
For a kit-bash one could cut one from the Accurail reefer if the width
of the cars bodies are similar.

Bob Witt


Re: Marion, OH RPM

golden1014
 

Hi Joe,

Thanks about the correction regarding the tower at Marion. I know practically nothing about the Erie Railroad--it is one of those very interesting roads I have always wanted to study, and now I have good reason to.

John

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Joseph Lofland <jjlofland@...> wrote:

John, et al,

Yes Marion is a great place to meet and watch trains. Absolutely great

Marion tower was moved from across the tracks and restored, however I think
you'll find that it's an Erie tower (AC) and the restored interlocking
equipment inside is Erie, not NYC. The Erie station is also a great example
of a groups effort's at restoration.

Joe Lofland

On Tue, May 24, 2011 at 12:03 AM, John Golden <golden1014@...> wrote:



Gentlemen,

I went to the Marion, OH RPM meet this weekend and had a great time. I
haven't
been to all the RPM meets, of course, but Denis Blake has gotta have the
best
location by far. He hosts the meet in the old Marion Union Station, which
is
now a musem. There's a ton of historical stuff and signal equipment
located on
the site, including a nice operating layout.

The station is surounded by three double-track mainlines and although I'm
not
much of a modern railfan I thoroughly enjoyed the parade of trains going by
the
depot. I was only able to attend the meet on Friday but I'm sure I saw
25-30
trains of all types.

There's plenty of stuff for the steam era fan to research there too--the
Marion
Shovel Works, the Erie yard, all the industry that once kept Marion going.
One
of the best things about the museum is the simulator for the old NYC tower
that
governed the junction--it works, and you can go into the tower and "play"
signalman, working the levers on an actual timed scenario with a totally
working
model board. It is one of the coolest things I've ever seen. If you're a
steam
era guy this is something you've gotta come and check out--it is worth the
trip.

We had a nice time and Denis was a great host. I saw about 400 models of
all
types and I understand more came on Saturday. We had inpromtu slide shows
and
the clinics were all excellent and held in an adjacent part of
the building.
The local restaurant--The Shovel (the name comes from the old Marion Shovel

Works which was next door)--had great lunch and dinner specials and was 20
feet
from the depot. I spent a lot of time talking with Warren Calloway, Stan
Rydarowicz, and others--it was a nice time and I highly recommend it for
those
that want a break from the ordinary RPM meet. That is, of course, after
you
come to St. Louis in a few months...

John

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL

2011 St. Louis RPM Meet Info:
http://icg.home.mindspring.com/rpm/stlrpm2011.htm

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Reading Box Car

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Drew <phillydrewcifer@...> wrote:

The covered hopper conversion was used to haul cocoa beans to the Hershey plant in Hershey, PA. Check out Wiseman Model Services (I think) for something close to the trucks.
Drew
Al Westerfield did patterns for these years ago. They went to Walker model Service, and thence to On-Trak Models when they bought Walker's line, and recently to Wiseman Model Services when Paul Redmond sold the On-Trak line to Wiseman. The Wiseman site was slow earlier today, but I see it's running now:

http://www.locopainter.com/store/product.php?id=424

Dennis


Re: Reading Box Car

Ed Walters
 

I couldn't find it via Google, but it's available at: http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924032183216

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Ray Breyer <rtbsvrr69@...> wrote:

al brown wrote:
Wow, what a beauty! Check out the fishbelly
underframe, unusual 
arch bar trucks, and Youngstown replacement door.
36' box, RDG class XMp, built 1912-1913.

If you want to scratchbuild one, there's a set of plans in the 1916 CBD. Figures 283 & 284, pages 289 & 290. The CBD is available as a free download on Google Books.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


Re: Reading Box Car

Ray Breyer
 

al brown wrote:
Wow, what a beauty! Check out the fishbelly
underframe, unusual 
arch bar trucks, and Youngstown replacement door.
36' box, RDG class XMp, built 1912-1913.

If you want to scratchbuild one, there's a set of plans in the 1916 CBD. Figures 283 & 284, pages 289 & 290. The CBD is available as a free download on Google Books.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


Re: Reading Box Car

Richard Hendrickson
 

On May 24, 2011, at 7:00 AM, al_brown03 wrote:

Wow, what a beauty! Check out the fishbelly underframe, unusual
arch bar trucks, and Youngstown replacement door.

36' box, RDG class XMp, built 1912-1913.
Those trucks were pressed steel arch bar trucks, made by the Pressed
Steel Car Co. See the 1906 Car Builders' Dictionary, p. 401. I
believe Al Westerfield once supplied HO scale versions of these
trucks, though I don't know where you would find them now.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Why not model actual train consists?

Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
 

Close, Bill, it was Matt Zebrowski. Matt has the only conductors' books listing Santa Fe train consists I've ever seen, which is one reason more people don't do what he did. - Andy Sperandeo


Re: Why not model actual train consists?

Bill Welch
 

This might be Matt Zebrieski. I was trying to help with info on a L&N 36-ft boxcar he needed for a ATSF freight train he was trying to model.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, tyesac@... wrote:


I've seen only one example of such a train, at the annual Santa Fe convention held in San Diego years ago. I don't remember who brought it but it was a sight to behold in regards to the level of model building work shown and background documentation & research behind it. As I recall it was around 25 - 30 cars and had only a few "stand ins". Each car was the correct version (rebuilds), appropriately weathered relative to the car age. The train in question was a version of the nightly northbound San Deigo/LA Surf line way freight.

The shorter the train, the likelihood for being modeled in it's entirety increases often because the whole train fit with in the frame of one camera shot. There is a well published set of photos by Stan Kistler of a way freight operating on the El Paso to Belen NM "horny toad" line. It's a nice candidate to be modeled exactly since Stan took a broadside photo of the whole consist of the short train. It's pulled by a 2-10-0 and included at least one MILW ribside box car as well as a PRR X29 & NYC steel side rebuild among other cars.

Accumulating the necessary information and then building the models can be a hobby with a hobby even without trying to get to an exact consist.

In relation to passenger trains, it's rare to have a conductors report for a specific consist on a certain day. Most passenger train modelers are, like freight train modelers, modeling a facsimile of a typical consist.

For example the Super Chief is one of the most documented & photographed trains in the west, yet, to cover daily LA Chicago service, Santa Fe had to have a minimum of six cars of each one/consist type cars (eg diners). For the usual four sleepers drawn from four separate groups (Pine,Regal,Blue, & Palm series) there were more than just six of each available to make up a typical Super Chief. Without a conductor's report, the permutations that are possible become impractical to model short of going into "ground hog day mode".

Tom Casey


I concur with Richard -- and I do find Bruce's description rather
condescending. Nowadays a home layout can run into 10's of thousands
of dollars, not to mention requiring space in one's home (which costs
a whole lot more). And many operating venues -- clubs and modular
layouts -- are not amenable to traditional "operations" where you can
leave your equipment, and know it won't be tampered with, mistreated
or even stolen. I like realistic operating too, occasionally, but it's
not my main focus. But I do like to run the trains that I build. If
you're lucky enough to find a consist you can model, it can be very
rewarding to model it, and know with certainty that this train really
did exist!

Tim O'Connor

--------------------------------------------------

Bruce Smith's objection that modeling specific trains would make it
impossible to do prototypical operation is, of course valid. but
modeling specific trains is a viable alternative for those of us who
don't have the space to build a model railroad that's suitable for
prototypical operation. My diorama is intended to be what Bruce
refers to (I hope not condescendingly) as a "railfan's" model
railroad; sit down on a stool (standing in for a pile of crossties)
and watch the trains run through a scene that is, as accurately as I
can make it, a miniature of a real place at a real point in time. I
find prototypical operation rewarding, too, but when I feel the need
for an operating fix I can get it at the La Mesa club's Tehachapi
Pass layout in San Diego or at Bill Darnaby's in suburban Chicago.
On both of those large model railroads, operations are realistic
enough that it's well worth the air fare to get there occasionally.

Richard Hendrickson






-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Mon, May 23, 2011 12:57 pm
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Why not model actual train consists?





I concur with Richard -- and I do find Bruce's description rather
condescending. Nowadays a home layout can run into 10's of thousands
of dollars, not to mention requiring space in one's home (which costs
a whole lot more). And many operating venues -- clubs and modular
layouts -- are not amenable to traditional "operations" where you can
leave your equipment, and know it won't be tampered with, mistreated
or even stolen. I like realistic operating too, occasionally, but it's
not my main focus. But I do like to run the trains that I build. If
you're lucky enough to find a consist you can model, it can be very
rewarding to model it, and know with certainty that this train really
did exist!

Tim O'Connor

--------------------------------------------------

Bruce Smith's objection that modeling specific trains would make it
impossible to do prototypical operation is, of course valid. but
modeling specific trains is a viable alternative for those of us who
don't have the space to build a model railroad that's suitable for
prototypical operation. My diorama is intended to be what Bruce
refers to (I hope not condescendingly) as a "railfan's" model
railroad; sit down on a stool (standing in for a pile of crossties)
and watch the trains run through a scene that is, as accurately as I
can make it, a miniature of a real place at a real point in time. I
find prototypical operation rewarding, too, but when I feel the need
for an operating fix I can get it at the La Mesa club's Tehachapi
Pass layout in San Diego or at Bill Darnaby's in suburban Chicago.
On both of those large model railroads, operations are realistic
enough that it's well worth the air fare to get there occasionally.

Richard Hendrickson






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Why not model actual train consists? (UNCLASSIFIED)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Sorry, I had no idea so many of you owned real train consists!

I would be overjoyed to see even one, for my area, much less timeframe.

If you know anyone that has actual train consists for the PRR's Monongahela
Division or Branch, for any timeframe, I will gladly sell any body part in
exchange.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
robertm
Sent: Monday, May 23, 2011 7:18 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Why not model actual train consists?




For me modeling actual train consists is always the goal.

Bob Moeller
--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , Jim Betz
<jimbetz@...> wrote:

Hi,

We keep re-visiting the topic of freight car distribution ...
and discussing how to represent the freight cars for a point in time
or an "era" ... and then, presumably, adjusting the mix of freight
cars on our layouts ...

So I'm prompted to ask "Why not model actual trains?" As in find a
train sheet you like and go for it - with selective compression - of
course. And then extend it to several trains.

Is anyone out there doing this? Thinking seriously about it?
Tried it and found they couldn't field enough models to fill the bill
(how close did you get)? Selectively compress out the models you don't
have as a first cut? No, substitutions allowed (same number series but
different number)? One box car - from the correct era - is just as
good as the next?

You could even preserve the order of the cars in the train even if you
aren't modelling all of them. And 'just' adjust the waybills for the
layout?
- Jim Why Not




Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


Re: Reading Box Car

George Losse
 

Al,

The Reading had 2000 XMp class boxcars built in four series AC&F.

11550-12349, 800 cars built 1910
12350-12999, 650 cars built 1912-1913
13000-13199, 200 cars built 1910
13200-13549, 350 cars built 1913

The ORER for Jan 1952 shows 65 in service.

Some of these cars were converted to covered hopper cars class XMph with
internal slope sheets, roof hatches, boarded over door openings and hopper
bottoms. They were used in Bean service between Philadelphia and Hershey,
PA.

George Losse



_____

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
al_brown03
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2011 10:00 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Reading Box Car




Wow, what a beauty! Check out the fishbelly underframe, unusual arch bar
trucks, and Youngstown replacement door.

36' box, RDG class XMp, built 1912-1913.
ORER series is 11550-13549, 987 cars 1/43, 33 cars 1/53.
Builder's photo: Kaminski, "AC&F", p 163 (the end straps were original
equipment, as were those trucks); order said to be 1000 cars, so the ORER
may have combined orders into one series.
Two photos of a covered-hopper conversion (you 'eard!): Bossler, "RDG Color
Guide", p 63.
End-on in-service shot: Pietrak, "Coudersport & Port Allegancy and New York
& Pennsylvania", p 67.

If I were building that, I might kitbash it from a Roundhouse old-timer box
body, and a shortened Accurail reefer underframe. Not sure what to do about
the trucks, might cheat and give it more modern ones. (The covered hoppers
mentioned above have AAR cast trucks.)

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "railfan"
<rdglines@...> wrote:

Hi,
Just saw this photo on ebay of a Reading wood box car and was wondering if
anyone give any info on it? And are there any models in HO scale that would
be close to modeling it?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem
<http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&;item=390316223052>
&item=390316223052

Thanks, Warren


Re: Reading Box Car

Drew M.
 

The covered hopper conversion was used to haul cocoa beans to the Hershey plant in Hershey, PA. Check out Wiseman Model Services (I think) for something close to the trucks.
Drew

--- On Tue, 5/24/11, al_brown03 <abrown@fit.edu> wrote:

From: al_brown03 <abrown@fit.edu>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Reading Box Car
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, May 24, 2011, 10:00 AM
















 









Wow, what a beauty! Check out the fishbelly underframe, unusual arch bar trucks, and Youngstown replacement door.



36' box, RDG class XMp, built 1912-1913.

ORER series is 11550-13549, 987 cars 1/43, 33 cars 1/53.

Builder's photo: Kaminski, "AC&F", p 163 (the end straps were original equipment, as were those trucks); order said to be 1000 cars, so the ORER may have combined orders into one series.

Two photos of a covered-hopper conversion (you 'eard!): Bossler, "RDG Color Guide", p 63.

End-on in-service shot: Pietrak, "Coudersport & Port Allegancy and New York & Pennsylvania", p 67.



If I were building that, I might kitbash it from a Roundhouse old-timer box body, and a shortened Accurail reefer underframe. Not sure what to do about the trucks, might cheat and give it more modern ones. (The covered hoppers mentioned above have AAR cast trucks.)



Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "railfan" <rdglines@...> wrote:

Hi,
Just saw this photo on ebay of a Reading wood box car and was wondering if anyone give any info on it? And are there any models in HO scale that would be close to modeling it?
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&;item=390316223052
Thanks, Warren


























[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Reading Box Car

al_brown03
 

Wow, what a beauty! Check out the fishbelly underframe, unusual arch bar trucks, and Youngstown replacement door.

36' box, RDG class XMp, built 1912-1913.
ORER series is 11550-13549, 987 cars 1/43, 33 cars 1/53.
Builder's photo: Kaminski, "AC&F", p 163 (the end straps were original equipment, as were those trucks); order said to be 1000 cars, so the ORER may have combined orders into one series.
Two photos of a covered-hopper conversion (you 'eard!): Bossler, "RDG Color Guide", p 63.
End-on in-service shot: Pietrak, "Coudersport & Port Allegancy and New York & Pennsylvania", p 67.

If I were building that, I might kitbash it from a Roundhouse old-timer box body, and a shortened Accurail reefer underframe. Not sure what to do about the trucks, might cheat and give it more modern ones. (The covered hoppers mentioned above have AAR cast trucks.)

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "railfan" <rdglines@...> wrote:

Hi,
Just saw this photo on ebay of a Reading wood box car and was wondering if anyone give any info on it? And are there any models in HO scale that would be close to modeling it?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&;item=390316223052

Thanks, Warren


Re: Box Car door stops

Rich C
 

That too is a good idea. I do have an Alumilite casting kit.
 
Thanks,
Rich Christie

--- On Mon, 5/23/11, pullmanboss <tcmadden@q.com> wrote:


From: pullmanboss <tcmadden@q.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Box Car door stops
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, May 23, 2011, 10:51 PM


 



Andy Carlson, lover of hyphens in Ojai CA, wrote:

We do not need to wait for some Details Whatever to get scale (or out-of-scale)
door stops. A decent part can be cast with 2-ton epoxy from Ace Hardware. Pour
into a single use mold made with modeling clay (or silly putty). A good door
stop is found on the Red Caboose(IMWX) '37 AAR boxcar. If you find any molded-on
door stop which you desire, copy it! If you want a bunch, make a semi-permanent
mold from single part 1200 degree Silicone auto exhaust sealer from the auto
parts store. I have a mold made with this stuff that has yielded over 60 (5
dozen) parts.
If you want to duplicate surface detail, like door hardware, make a mold of the complete door. Then carefully file or sand the detail you want to capture from the door pattern. Coat the modified pattern with mold release, fill the hardware cavities in the mold with daubs of resin, then press the pattern into the mold. After the resin has cured, pop the door out of the mold. Your surface detail will be cast in place on the door pattern, but easily removable because of the release agent.

Tom Madden








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Marion, OH RPM

Joseph Lofland
 

John, et al,

Yes Marion is a great place to meet and watch trains. Absolutely great

Marion tower was moved from across the tracks and restored, however I think
you'll find that it's an Erie tower (AC) and the restored interlocking
equipment inside is Erie, not NYC. The Erie station is also a great example
of a groups effort's at restoration.

Joe Lofland

On Tue, May 24, 2011 at 12:03 AM, John Golden <golden1014@yahoo.com> wrote:



Gentlemen,

I went to the Marion, OH RPM meet this weekend and had a great time. I
haven't
been to all the RPM meets, of course, but Denis Blake has gotta have the
best
location by far. He hosts the meet in the old Marion Union Station, which
is
now a musem. There's a ton of historical stuff and signal equipment
located on
the site, including a nice operating layout.

The station is surounded by three double-track mainlines and although I'm
not
much of a modern railfan I thoroughly enjoyed the parade of trains going by
the
depot. I was only able to attend the meet on Friday but I'm sure I saw
25-30
trains of all types.

There's plenty of stuff for the steam era fan to research there too--the
Marion
Shovel Works, the Erie yard, all the industry that once kept Marion going.
One
of the best things about the museum is the simulator for the old NYC tower
that
governed the junction--it works, and you can go into the tower and "play"
signalman, working the levers on an actual timed scenario with a totally
working
model board. It is one of the coolest things I've ever seen. If you're a
steam
era guy this is something you've gotta come and check out--it is worth the
trip.

We had a nice time and Denis was a great host. I saw about 400 models of
all
types and I understand more came on Saturday. We had inpromtu slide shows
and
the clinics were all excellent and held in an adjacent part of
the building.
The local restaurant--The Shovel (the name comes from the old Marion Shovel

Works which was next door)--had great lunch and dinner specials and was 20
feet
from the depot. I spent a lot of time talking with Warren Calloway, Stan
Rydarowicz, and others--it was a nice time and I highly recommend it for
those
that want a break from the ordinary RPM meet. That is, of course, after
you
come to St. Louis in a few months...

John

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL

2011 St. Louis RPM Meet Info:
http://icg.home.mindspring.com/rpm/stlrpm2011.htm

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Reading Box Car

Warren
 

Hi,
Just saw this photo on ebay of a Reading wood box car and was wondering if anyone give any info on it? And are there any models in HO scale that would be close to modeling it?

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&;item=390316223052

Thanks, Warren


Re: Marion, OH RPM

seaboard_1966
 

Andy

Thanks for posting these. Add in the ones on the Photobucket site and there are a ton of photos of the meet on line. A good time was had by ALL in attendance. Mother Nature cooperated after a week of rain to give us a couple of nice days for the meet. As Andy documented with photos, and John mentioned with words, there were over 400 models, many of them steam era, is you check out the photo selection.

Many thanks to those that attended and I look forward to seeing more of you there next year.

Also, thanks to those that helped make the meet possible. You all know who you are, your assistance was invaluable.

Check out the sites below for more information and photos of the meet.

http://www.hansmanns.org/meet/

http://www.facebook.com/pages/manage/#!/pages/Central-Ohio-Prototype-Modelers-Meet/326645470797

http://s1187.photobucket.com/albums/z397/salguy1/?start=all


Denis Blake


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From: "Andy Harman" <gsgondola@gp30.com>
Sent: Tuesday, May 24, 2011 12:23 AM
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Marion, OH RPM

http://www.gp30.com/events/Marion2011/

Random photos of the meet, no captions... but it's quick and dirty and
they're up there.

Andy



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Re: Why not model actual train consists?

Robert kirkham
 

On the other hand, if I have consists for one of the classes of trains I need to model, it helps. When modelling the trains for which there are no consists one can use other versions of analysis/guess-work we often resort to - but no sense dispensing with better info if it is available.

Rob Kirkham

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From: "soolinehistory" <destorzek@mchsi.com>
Sent: Monday, May 23, 2011 4:02 PM
To: <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Why not model actual train consists?



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:


Interestingly, I have yet to find single consist from my period on my
modeled section of railroad (PRR, COLA tower, June 1944) so I have no
choice anyway.
I tend to agree with Bruce. If one is trying to model the operation, unless one has access to the train consists across the territory for the entire time modeled, or preferably multiples of that time period, you have no assurance you have all the cars you need. Even having a year's worth of time book consists won't assure you all the cars; depending on where the owner of the time book stood on the seniority roster, he likely wasn't working ALL the possible jobs. If he was too far down the list, he didn't catch the prize manifest jobs, whereas, if he was near the top, he didn't catch the dog-breath locals and empty car haulers. Either way, he missed recording either the reefers running non stop clear across the division, or the stinky Mty stockcars.

If you are going to model the entire day's action across the territory, rather than just one train, you need both, and everything else in between.

Dennis



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