Date   

Re: Contests (was: NMRA Sacramento)

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jul 15, 2011, at 6:10 PM, Andy Harman wrote:

At 12:26 AM 7/16/2011 +0000, you wrote:
I thought he was a cardiologist.
Will the real Doc Denny please stand up? :-)
I'll do it for him, since I'm sure he's fed up with this nonsense.
Denny Anspach has an MD from the Stanford University School of
Medicine and, before his retirement, was a specialist in Neurology,
Diagnostic Radiology, and Neuroradiology. If list members aren't
careful, he can zap your brains with X-rays and turn you into
gibbering idiots - but that would be redundant, wouldn't it? <g>

Richard Hendrickson (who happens to be a PhD though not an NMRA
certified MMR)


English Spelling

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jul 15, 2011, at 6:09 PM, Steve Lucas wrote:

Good thing that the Simplified Spelling Board's style that Andrew
Carnegie favoured didn't catch on.
I'm responding to Steve off-list, for obvious reasons. Anyone else
who is interested in this topic, which obviously has nothing to do
with steam era freight cars, can e-mail me OFF-LIST and I'll send
them the same post I'm sending to Steve.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Contests (was: NMRA Sacramento)

Andy Harman
 

At 12:26 AM 7/16/2011 +0000, you wrote:
I thought he was a cardiologist.
Will the real Doc Denny please stand up? :-)

Andy


Re: Colour match for the Rutland

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

Good thing that the Simplified Spelling Board's style that Andrew Carnegie favoured didn't catch on.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Jul 15, 2011, at 5:30 AM, Pierre wrote:

Thanks, Marty.
A quick look at the paint rack suggests Scalecoat Boxcar Red #2.
I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many
words. Armour, honour, colour, etc. But I digress...
Putting on one of my other hats, as a retired professor of English
linguistics I can tell you that Americans dropped the "u" in colour,
labour, etc. owing almost entirely to the efforts of Noah Webster,
whose spelling books predominated in U. S. schools for several
generations. Webster, caught in the post-colonial American revolt
against all things British, believed that American English had
diverged far enough from British English to be considered a separate
language with its own standards. That wasn't true, but it WAS true
that American English had evolved into a number of regional dialects
that were notably different from any of the dialects of British
English, including what linguists call RSB (Received Standard
British), the non-regional dialect of the upper classes and the upper
class universities which became the standard for written English on
both sides of the Atlantic. Webster wanted to completely reform
American spelling, an effort which largely failed, but he did succeed
in dropping the "u" in the spellings of "-our" words, changing "gaol"
to "jail," and numerous other minor revisions which persist today.
Thanks to Webster, though the clues are subtle, one can look at
almost any book written in modern English and quickly determine
whether it was published in the United States or in Great Britain or
a Commonwealth country.

Now, to drag a freight car topic in by the ears, why didn't the
spelling change in the name of the Armour packing company? As you
suggested in another post, Armour reefers still have the "u" in the
name because it was a family name which the family chose not to
change. Family names, understandably, tend to preserve obsolete
spellings. Another example is the Morrell packing company, where the
double "R" and double "L" survived, though the name of the mushroom
species that's pronounced the same way is "morel." Many family names
were already established well before English spelling began to be
standardized in the 18th century.


Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Contests (was: NMRA Sacramento)

Jared Harper
 

I thought he was a cardiologist.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


LOL. Very revealing Ben! -- you know Denny is a gynecologist, yes?

Tim


I know who I'M calling after my next workshop mishap...and it's not the guy with
the certification from the NMRA.
Ben Hom


Re: sources of data

Tim O'Connor
 

Al is right, there are thousands of online images especially in collections.
Some of them are extraordinary:
http://www.shorpy.com/node/6924

Tim O'Connor



Joel - Forgive me if I seem harsh, but photos of wood rolling stock are everywhere. I issued a DVD of hundreds of them among the 1,900 or so photos on my American Car & Foundry disk covering 1899-1925. The Sante Fe and Southern Pacific are covered in detail by numerous books. The Pennsy society magazine has covered almost all wooden classes over the years. Most railroad historical societies have similar publications and many offer blueprints for sale. More and more city and state historical societies are digitizing their collections. Quite a number of links have been given here lately that cover insurance damage photos, some covering wooden cars. Example: one B&M box car that crashed under an elevated transit line. Professional photo dealers (see list published by Jack Burgess) have hundreds of such photos. I could go on but you get the idea. - Al Westerfield


FGE Book Update

Bill Welch
 

Dear Bill and I am sure others:

I appreciate your interest. This seems like a good time to update people on what is going on.

Since formally retiring in February, I spend several hours a day , every day, working on the book about the FGE/WFE/BRE System from 1919 through 1957. At this point this is about a 50/50 proposition divided between writing and rewriting and organizing the materials and resources that I already have and to my amazement, continue to find and accumulate. This includes approximately 6,000 pages of FGE and WFE correspondence, reports, memos, etc., about 900 drawings, and probably by now 800 photographs. There are numerous other things as well. Depending on how I feel and what energizes me on any particular day, I either write, crop and repair photographs, or organize things, especially if I am getting ready to use a particular group of materials. Virtually every week (no exaggeration), something new comes my way via a tip from someone, or arrives in the mail, or I otherwise become aware of.

I have about seven or eight chapters under way and some friends, most of whom are on this list, have DRAFTS of Chapters One and Two or portions thereof that I am waiting to hear feedback on.

Those same friends and others continue to either send me treasures or tell me about them that flesh out details. Others have helped me with concrete tasks. For example one person on this list developed an incredible Excel spread sheet for me using some modest resources I had together with an invaluable resource he owns that identifies both by railroad and by state and locale the almost 400+ Icing Stations of the FGE/WFE/BRE System.

Other have volunteered to help me explain the operations, which for FGE especially was very complex given the number of railroads that originated produce traffic in it territory. I am going to have a very long list of "thank you's."

Whenever I get frustrated with how long it seems to be taking, I remember that between the PFE and SFRD books, there were 7 people involved. Then I get back to work.

At this point, i am seriously thinking this will be a 2 volume set. I have a very natural way of doing this division of subject matter in mind. They would be sold as a set and would include DVD's with materials I have digitized like the FGE/WFE/BRE System Employee Magazine "Teamwork," drawings, and other materials related to the business of transporting fresh fruits and vegetables.

Moving to Florida in 2009 has proved to be surprising bonus. Next week I am driving to the Orlando to interview a 92 year old gentleman who was in the produce business as early as 1940 in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina about the business from the viewpoint of a grower and shipper and some of you have helped me with coming up with a list of questions. There are also many retired FGE employees in Florida and one is a retired Icing Dock worker and Agent that I will be interviewing soon also.

At this point I am confident I can document virtually every group of steel sheathed cars, including all of the 40-ft. and 50-ft Mechanicals built from 1948 through 1957, the insulated cars owned by FGE/WFE/BRE, and the 40-ft Ice Bunker cars. There is at least one group of steel rebuilds I do not have good documentation of however.

There are more gaps with the wood sheathed cars, but I remain hopeful that I will eventually obtain photos that will enable me to be more confident about this very mixed fleet. Having said that, most will find what I have pretty comprehensive authoritative.

One document I continue to search for is any edition of the Southern Freight Tariff Bureau's "Perishable Tariff." If anyone has a copy of this, or knows of one, I hope you will be in contact with me.

Having said all of this, I believe I am at least 2-3 years away before I have something I can present to a publisher.

Let me close by thanking all of you that have supported this effort with concrete assistance and those treasures you have directed me to or direct to me. This is genuinely a collaborative effort and I appreciate the generosity and interest people have displayed in helping me.

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727.470.9930
fgexbill@...

--- In STMFC@..., "billdgoat@..." <billdgoat@...> wrote:

Any word on when this book will be coming out?
Karen's books also still has no word on the merchant's Dispatch book. Any word on that one.
Bill Williams


sources of data

Al and Patricia Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Joel - Forgive me if I seem harsh, but photos of wood rolling stock are everywhere. I issued a DVD of hundreds of them among the 1,900 or so photos on my American Car & Foundry disk covering 1899-1925. The Sante Fe and Southern Pacific are covered in detail by numerous books. The Pennsy society magazine has covered almost all wooden classes over the years. Most railroad historical societies have similar publications and many offer blueprints for sale. More and more city and state historical societies are digitizing their collections. Quite a number of links have been given here lately that cover insurance damage photos, some covering wooden cars. Example: one B&M box car that crashed under an elevated transit line. Professional photo dealers (see list published by Jack Burgess) have hundreds of such photos. I could go on but you get the idea. - Al Westerfield

----- Original Message -----
From: Joel Holmes
To: Andy Harman ; STMFC@... ; cjriley42@...
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2011 1:04 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] ADMIN: NMRA Contest Thread Termination



Hi Andy, CJ & Others,

Please forgive me for not replying sooner. There are more things to do
than just sit in front of a computer all day. I have a large yard and
garden which need a lot of attention as well as some modeling, work and
other things.

Model railroading is in the mind of the person doing the modeling. To
look down our noses at someone we consider as doing inferior work
(modeling that does not fit our prospective) is hurting the hobby.

I have for many years attempted to do my modeling along the prototype
lines. I do have a few fantasy cars, or cars that do the job for me. I
am going to disagree with much of the logic or comments put out on this
thread. I fully expect to be totally trashed by my comets and will accept
it.

I am building a model railroad based on the 1912 to 1920 era. To be
totally accurate I am building all sorts of wooden cars. There are no,
and mean 0, wooden cars produced by manufactures that replicate the cars
that I need to run on my layout. I must scratch build all of my wooden
cars. Pictures are very few and very far between. Some decals are made
by Art Griffin and some others, but many are not and I have to take decals
from where ever I can mix to get the correct prototype lettering. Often,
I do not even know what the lettering was like. Often, the only way I can
build a car is to use the dimensions posted in my 1924 equipment guide and
by using car building techniques of the day found in my 1906 car builders
encyclopedia. There were cars still in service that were built before
1900.

Under these circumstances with very little prototypical data, using your
criteria, no matter how well built, or how close to actual car building
practices of the 1880 to 1920 I use, the car could never be judged and
receive a good score. To impose a harsh prototypical data requirement on
judging I feel thwarts model building. Also, I could never run a
prototypical model railroad using only a few of the car types in use
during that time period.

I have had several cars judged where the only data was a picture, and the
data from the equipment guide, I received merit awards. Had I not had a
picture and using your criteria, I probably would not have received merit
awards for the models.

To have as close as possible models for a period layout, we might as well
forget getting good scores or even a master modelers designation?

I also feel without judging and contests, the quality of modeling could
suffer greatly. However, a limit could be imposed upon those who win
every year.

Joel Holmes

> On Fri, 15 Jul 2011 09:36:35 -0500 (CDT), Joel Holmes wrote


Re: Nomenclature - Boxcar or Box Car?

Walter M. Clark
 

Tik Tok from the Oz books.

Time stopped in November 1941
Walter M. Clark
Pullman, Washington, USA

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Mike Brock wrote

Un for tu nate ly I can re call the "dis cus sions" here re gard ing "so lid",
"plain", and "fric tion" jour nal bear ings. Rich ard led the charge to use the
more "pro per" term "plain" or "sol id" bear ing due to use in the pro to type
rail road me dia of our per i od.

Mikebrock,Iwasexperimentingwithseparationbetweensyllablesofeverywordasapossible
solutiontothisterminologicalconundrumbutthenIrealizedweprobablywouldnotallbeable
toagreeonwheretoputthesyllableboundaries.Yoursinparsinghell,TimO'Connor


Re: LCL c. 1952

rwitt_2000
 

Ben Hom wrote:

Bob Witt wrote:
"Only box cars with a circle T were suitable for Time-Saver Service no
matter
what
logo was stenciled on the car."

So you're telling us that Time-Saver Service consisted only of B&O
cars in
captive service, and no interchanged foreign road cars were handled in
B&O LCL
trains? I find that very hard to believe.
Ben,

I don't see where I used "captive service" in my reply. I don't believe
the B&O placed box cars in captive service. All the B&O cars I discussed
were suitable for interchange service.

All I was trying to state is that a B&O box car could have the "Sentinel
Service" logo and also have a circle T stenciled on the car. I have
several photos of B&O box cars with the "Sentinel Service" to right of
the door and with a circle T to the left of the road number. I have
other examples of B&O box cars with the "Time-Saver Service" logo, but
without a circle T stencil. These logos were just advertising and the
presence of circle T stencil indicated what cars were potentially
suitable for LCL loading.

I was discussing what B&O box cars were suitable for LCL loading not
what cars were accepted in interchange. If a box car was contaminated
and not suitable for LCL loading any longer I assume the circle T would
be painted over, but I have no documentation about such instructions. I
have no idea how the B&O decided what foreign road cars to load for LCL
service while on B&O property.

Bob Witt


Re: New Intermountain Andrews Trucks?

Walter M. Clark
 

Ian Clasper has a trick to improve Accurail Andrews trucks at http://www.steamfreightcars.com/modeling/articles/accuandrewsmain.html
He carves off the cast on brake shoes and adds Kadee brake gear. I've also used it on other Accurail trucks and it sure improves the appearance.

Time stopped in November 1941
Walter M. Clark
Pullman, Washington, USA

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Jun 20, 2011, at 11:02 AM, John Golden wrote:

Gentlemen,

I've noticed that Intermountain is using what appears to be an
upgraded, much
finer Andrews truck on their recent HO scale models. Does anyone
know if these
trucks are Intermountain or some other brand, and would you know
where I could
obtain additional copies? Thanks.
John, the USRA Andrews trucks on my IM Santa Fe Caswell gondolas
appear to be made by or for them. They're similar but not the same
as Accurail's Andrews trucks. Both are very good; they have well
formed and detailed, and prototypically slender, side frames but the
brake shoes don't line up with the wheels and there is no brake
rigging. I happen to know that Brian Leppert at Tahoe Model Works is
making dies for a USRA Andrews truck even as I write, and though I
don't know when those trucks will be for sale, you might want to wait
for them, as they will be (as usual) superior to everyone else's
trucks of that type.

Richard Hendrickson





Terry Wegmann's Challenge

Andy Carlson
 

Many who are reading messages from this list have at least heard about Terry
Wegmann. Many small parts we have become accustomed to, and some various scale's
models. Terry is 67 years old, and up to 8 weeks ago, lived quietly in his
humble one-bedroom apartment in coastal Orange County, Southern California.

8 weeks ago, Terry was delivered to the Huntington Beach Hospital by ambulance
where he was quickly placed on life-support and had a trachy device installed.
After many surgeries, Terry was facing near-certain death because of Renal
failure and Liver shut-down. Daily dialysis helped his body to recover, and
though he has had many setbacks, he is slowly improving to where his physiscian
thinks that Terry will survive this. He is still in the IC unit, and the
earliest that his trach will be removed remains at least a week or longer.

His problems started with a ruptered artery, which allowed 1/2 of his stomach to
go necrotic. The toxins from that are what contributed to the systemic failures.
Terry is now receiving dialysis once a week, and now just needs to recover
enough to be placed in a skilled nursing center. His improvement is very modest,
but still is improvement.

Terry is now alert, and knows what happened and what he faces. He is reported to
be very depressed, and I can certainly understand that. I believe that if
anyone would benefit from the thoughts of others, such as expressed in simple
letters, notes, or cards, Terry is one.

Terry's address is

Huntington Beach Hospital
17772 Beach Blvd
Huntington Beach, CA 92647
714 843 5000

Thanks very much for listening...
-Andy Carlson


Re: FGE Book

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Any word on when this book will be coming out?
Karen's books also still has no word on the merchant's Dispatch book. Any word on that one.
The author is still working on the FGE book, as far as I know, and he has not even decided whether to submit it to us, so I certainly have no idea of when it will be published. I do hope it comes to us.
We have had some glitches on the MDT book, which I had hoped to print in the spring, but it's nearly ready now to go the printer. It will certainly be published in the fall, but until we have printer's schedules, we won't know anything more specific than that. Whenever we have a definite availability date, it will be on our website right away, but that will be fairly close to the publication date.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


FGE Book

bill_d_goat
 

Any word on when this book will be coming out?
Karen's books also still has no word on the merchant's Dispatch book. Any word on that one.
Bill Williams


Re: Colour match for the Rutland

Armand Premo
 

Wet yet?

----- Original Message -----
From: Armand Premo
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2011 1:56 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Colour match for the Rutland



More hot air than steam IMHO.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
From: PennsyNut
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2011 12:17 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Colour match for the Rutland

On 15,07 2011 7:30 AM, Pierre wrote:
>
> Thanks, Marty.
> A quick look at the paint rack suggests Scalecoat Boxcar Red #2.
> I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many
> words. Armour, honour, colour, etc. But I digress...
> Pierre Oliver
>
You say po tay toe, I say po tah toe, etc. I agree with Pierre, we
American's have had a hay day with English. Petrol became gas! Bonnet
became hood! bunches of stuff. Digression is fun -- sometimes. LOL
And thanks to our moderator for shutting off the NMRA, Conventions, etc.
I kept wondering what that all has to do with steam.
Morgan Bilbo Ferroequinologist SPF PRRTHS #1204



----------------------------------------------------------

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Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Internal Virus Database is out of date.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 9.0.891 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3235 - Release Date: 11/03/10 04:36:00


Re: Colour match for the Rutland

Rossiter, Mark W <Mark.Rossiter@...>
 

The "Remembering the Rutland" website has a Q&A section that contains
several postings regarding recommended passenger car, freight car and
caboose colors.



http://users.rcn.com/jimdu4/Q&A/q&a.htm



There are a number of color books on the Rutland that allow you to make
your own judgment based on the era you are modeling. The topic of "what
is the correct color of Pullman Green?" could generate a thousand
responses alone.



Bob's Photo has a ton of color pictures available for sale also,
although many of his are of the later yellow and green scheme of the
50's than from earlier eras.



Do an internet search and you are sure to stumble across some of the
Fallen Flags photo hosting sites.



- - Mark


Re: ADMIN: NMRA Contest Thread Termination

Joel Holmes <lehighvalley@...>
 

Hi Andy, CJ & Others,

Please forgive me for not replying sooner. There are more things to do
than just sit in front of a computer all day. I have a large yard and
garden which need a lot of attention as well as some modeling, work and
other things.

Model railroading is in the mind of the person doing the modeling. To
look down our noses at someone we consider as doing inferior work
(modeling that does not fit our prospective) is hurting the hobby.

I have for many years attempted to do my modeling along the prototype
lines. I do have a few fantasy cars, or cars that do the job for me. I
am going to disagree with much of the logic or comments put out on this
thread. I fully expect to be totally trashed by my comets and will accept
it.

I am building a model railroad based on the 1912 to 1920 era. To be
totally accurate I am building all sorts of wooden cars. There are no,
and mean 0, wooden cars produced by manufactures that replicate the cars
that I need to run on my layout. I must scratch build all of my wooden
cars. Pictures are very few and very far between. Some decals are made
by Art Griffin and some others, but many are not and I have to take decals
from where ever I can mix to get the correct prototype lettering. Often,
I do not even know what the lettering was like. Often, the only way I can
build a car is to use the dimensions posted in my 1924 equipment guide and
by using car building techniques of the day found in my 1906 car builders
encyclopedia. There were cars still in service that were built before
1900.

Under these circumstances with very little prototypical data, using your
criteria, no matter how well built, or how close to actual car building
practices of the 1880 to 1920 I use, the car could never be judged and
receive a good score. To impose a harsh prototypical data requirement on
judging I feel thwarts model building. Also, I could never run a
prototypical model railroad using only a few of the car types in use
during that time period.

I have had several cars judged where the only data was a picture, and the
data from the equipment guide, I received merit awards. Had I not had a
picture and using your criteria, I probably would not have received merit
awards for the models.

To have as close as possible models for a period layout, we might as well
forget getting good scores or even a master modelers designation?

I also feel without judging and contests, the quality of modeling could
suffer greatly. However, a limit could be imposed upon those who win
every year.

Joel Holmes

On Fri, 15 Jul 2011 09:36:35 -0500 (CDT), Joel Holmes wrote
No Quite,
I am horrified by some of the comments made about judging and contests.
Why?
Andy


Re: Colour match for the Rutland

Armand Premo
 

More hot air than steam IMHO.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: PennsyNut
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, July 15, 2011 12:17 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Colour match for the Rutland



On 15,07 2011 7:30 AM, Pierre wrote:
>
> Thanks, Marty.
> A quick look at the paint rack suggests Scalecoat Boxcar Red #2.
> I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many
> words. Armour, honour, colour, etc. But I digress...
> Pierre Oliver
>
You say po tay toe, I say po tah toe, etc. I agree with Pierre, we
American's have had a hay day with English. Petrol became gas! Bonnet
became hood! bunches of stuff. Digression is fun -- sometimes. LOL
And thanks to our moderator for shutting off the NMRA, Conventions, etc.
I kept wondering what that all has to do with steam.
Morgan Bilbo Ferroequinologist SPF PRRTHS #1204








------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Internal Virus Database is out of date.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 9.0.891 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/3235 - Release Date: 11/03/10 04:36:00


Re: Colour match for the Rutland

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jul 15, 2011, at 5:30 AM, Pierre wrote:

Thanks, Marty.
A quick look at the paint rack suggests Scalecoat Boxcar Red #2.
I've always wondered when America decided to shed the "u" in many
words. Armour, honour, colour, etc. But I digress...
Putting on one of my other hats, as a retired professor of English
linguistics I can tell you that Americans dropped the "u" in colour,
labour, etc. owing almost entirely to the efforts of Noah Webster,
whose spelling books predominated in U. S. schools for several
generations. Webster, caught in the post-colonial American revolt
against all things British, believed that American English had
diverged far enough from British English to be considered a separate
language with its own standards. That wasn't true, but it WAS true
that American English had evolved into a number of regional dialects
that were notably different from any of the dialects of British
English, including what linguists call RSB (Received Standard
British), the non-regional dialect of the upper classes and the upper
class universities which became the standard for written English on
both sides of the Atlantic. Webster wanted to completely reform
American spelling, an effort which largely failed, but he did succeed
in dropping the "u" in the spellings of "-our" words, changing "gaol"
to "jail," and numerous other minor revisions which persist today.
Thanks to Webster, though the clues are subtle, one can look at
almost any book written in modern English and quickly determine
whether it was published in the United States or in Great Britain or
a Commonwealth country.

Now, to drag a freight car topic in by the ears, why didn't the
spelling change in the name of the Armour packing company? As you
suggested in another post, Armour reefers still have the "u" in the
name because it was a family name which the family chose not to
change. Family names, understandably, tend to preserve obsolete
spellings. Another example is the Morrell packing company, where the
double "R" and double "L" survived, though the name of the mushroom
species that's pronounced the same way is "morel." Many family names
were already established well before English spelling began to be
standardized in the 18th century.


Richard Hendrickson


Re: Rapido Meat Reefer

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
They look good, and I appreciate the date information. One question: Are all of these paint schemes legit? No offense, but I must ask, I have shelves of foobies/stand-ins already... I'm interested in the mid 1950's and later.
THey are certainly legal relative to the 1934 ICC decision on billboard reefers, because the cars weren't built until 1937. Or do you mean "legal" in the colloquial sense, that is, are some of the paint schemes not appropriate for this car body?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

94021 - 94040 of 195634