Date   

Re: Ajin triple dome tank car

Bruce Smith
 

Mark,

I'm not sure what you are asking? If you mean price, then I have no
idea as I will not sign up for a "free trial" service that requires my
credit card info and that I cancel in order not to be charged. If that
was your question, please post the complete question, rather than making
us sign up for some hokey service nto figure it out.

If you think the price is high it certainly is posible as the item was
for sale by Dan's Train Depot, a company out of Ocala Florida (and of
which I am a satisfied customer) that slightly overvalues many brass
items compared to their going eBay prices.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, Al

"Mark M" <bnonut@yahoo.com> 09/04/11 11:08 PM >>>
Found the Overland/Ajin brass triple dome tank car ACF 8000 gallons on
google.

Asked about this some time back and wonder if they really have this car
correct.

URL

http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/ho-scale-brass-overland-3132-000-gal-95333749


Suggestions and Thank You

Mark Morgan





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: ORER 1947ish request NRC

John King
 

Allen,

From the January 1947 ORER

NRC 10,000 to 10999, 371 cars in series.

RS,
IL 33' 5 3/4" between ice tanks.
IH 6' 11 1/2"
IW 8" 2 5/8"

The writing sure is getting small in those books, didn't use to need glasses to read them.

John King

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "allen_282" <allen_282@...> wrote:

My 1949 ORER doesn't have a 10xxx entry for NRC,
I could use AAR Mech type, IL,IH,IW for decoding interchange book.

Thanks In Advance

Allen Rueter
St. Louis


ORER 1947ish request NRC

Allen Rueter
 

My 1949 ORER doesn't have a 10xxx entry for NRC,
I could use AAR Mech type, IL,IH,IW for decoding interchange book.

Thanks In Advance

Allen Rueter
St. Louis


Ajin triple dome tank car

Mark
 

Found the Overland/Ajin brass triple dome tank car ACF 8000 gallons on google.

Asked about this some time back and wonder if they really have this car correct.

URL

http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/ho-scale-brass-overland-3132-000-gal-95333749


Suggestions and Thank You

Mark Morgan


Re: Challenging Kits to build

john.allyn@...
 

Eric -- This car has a curse on it.  I remember trying to building the wood/metal version of the Erie/Susquehanna horizontal rib car made by Quality Craft by in the late Cretaceous era of model railroading.  It was a horror to build and looked awful to boot. 

John B. Allyn
3602 Hoods Hill Road
Nashville TN 37215
615-298-2873 (H)
615-973-4280 (C)
615-297-3870 (Fax)

----- Original Message -----
From: "Eric" <eric@hansmanns.org>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, September 3, 2011 10:51:13 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Challenging Kits to build

 




While I have not yet hit a dozen resin kits assembled, the most challenging so far is the Funaro & Camerlengo Erie horizontal-rib hopper. Construction pushed me to several creative applications for hardware details that were crude or not mentioned in the instructions.

Thinking through the processes and not pushing myself to do too much at one sitting were key elements to the progress. With complex resin kit builds, we tend to push into a mentally tired state and make poor choices or flub because we have already processed lots of info. I've learned to put the tools down and walk away for an hour if my frustration level builds. It is amazing how different a project can look after walking the dogs a mile or two.

Eric

Eric Hansmann
New Paltz, NY


Refer Hatches

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

In the Fourth Quarter 1988 Santa Fe Modeler Keith Jordan did an article on SFRD refer
hatch covers. In it he states that the RR-23's - 48"s used the reversed "Type B" hatch
cover. This would liave the RR-19's with the "Plate Reversed" hatch cover. This was not
covered in the instructions for the Sunshine Mini Kits for the RR-19's. I just want to
check before proceeding with this kit.

Thanks in advance:

Bill Pardie


Re: EJE 7300-series rebuilt boxcar details

cloggydog <Alan.Monk@...>
 

Many thanks Richard.

1955 would be my era.

Regards,
Alan
Reading, UK

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Sep 3, 2011, at 3:47 PM, cloggydog wrote:

But I'm struggling to find out what running board type was used,
steel (of which type) or wood?? The USRA DS spreadsheet in the
files area notes everything but the running board type
Depends on when you're modeling the car. The early photos I have
show wood running boards, but later ones show Morton steel running
boards.
Richard Hendrickson


Re: Special Car For Cooling Experiments

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:
The following article is from the Pacific Rural Press, Volume 77, Number 17, 24 April 1909. The car in question was used to demonstrate the concept of precooling fruit before transit.
There are two photos of the car in the USDA _Yearbook_ for 1910, and they are reproduced on page 354 of the PFE book.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Special Car For Cooling Experiments

Bob C <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

The following article is from the Pacific Rural Press, Volume 77, Number 17, 24 April 1909. The car in question was used to demonstrate the concept of precooling fruit before transit. The article mentions G. Harold Powell, who was a leader in the early citrus industry, bringing scientific management and industrial engineering concepts to one of the few areas of agriculture that at the time was willing to try them. He served in a number of capacities in the citrus fruit industry.

Does anyone have more information about this car? A picture would be great.

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA
+++++

MR. POWELL HAS A SPECIAL CAR FOR COOLING EXPERIMENTS.

Mr. G. Harold Powell now has at Riverside a special car which was built for experimental cooling of fruits before they are started on long-distance shipments. The arrangement of the machinery in this car was designed by L. S. Tenny, government expert on refrigeration, who is in Riverside, and in charge of this portable refrigeration plant. The plant was not only designed by Mr. Tenny, but was assembled under his direction, and is acknowledged to be a masterpiece of engineering skill by all who have inspected the plant.

One-half of the car contains the machinery, while the other half is an insulated coil-room containing about 5200 feet of 1¼ -inch extra heavy continuous welded ammonia coils arranged in eight coils, each coil complete with separate ammonia expansion valves. In the other half of the car the machinery is located. There is a 35-horse-power kerosene oil engine for the source of power; this engine by various belts and counter-shafts drives a 12-ton ice machine, a 2 K.W. generator for lighting and power, a 48-inch blower for blowing the air to be cooled over the coils, a centrifugal brine pump, and a motor-driven triple pump.

This room also contains a 42-pipe double pipe ammonia condenser, two large liquid ammonia receivers, an oil interceptor for the ammonia, water storage tanks, speed changing counter-shaft, and the complete piping and fittings for the kerosene, water, ammonia and oil lines.

This plant is installed in a space practically 20 feet long by 7 feet wide and 6 feet 6 inches high, so it can be readily understood the difficulties to be encountered in undertaking to place such a large amount of apparatus in such a small space.

A temperature of 15 degrees below zero is easily obtained in the air in the coil room.

This refrigeration car has been designed for the purpose of making it possible to carry the government's experiments and demonstrations into places where it would be impossible to assemble the equipment necessary for an exact scientific investigation of refrigerating conditions. It is the policy of the Department of Agriculture to give every section and every industry the benefit of the government's work, and this refrigerating car has been constructed at great expense with this in view. It has been the policy of the Department of Agriculture to thoroughly instill into the minds of fruit growers the basis fact that the matter of greatest importance in the successful shipment and marketing of fruit is to have fruit that has been uninjured in the handling. In other words, before it is proper to take up such questions as pre-cooling and refrigeration it is necessary to make sure that the fruit has been rightly treated up to the time that it has arrived at the refrigeration stage.

Mr. G. Harold Powell, in charge of this work for the government, in discussing pre-cooling methods, says: "The principal object of cooling fruit before shipment is to quickly retard the ripening processes and the development of decay and to equalize the temperature in the ear during the trip. In ordinary iced shipments the fruit is loaded in a car in a warm condition. It requires several days after the fruit is loaded before the temperature of the fruit is reduced to a degree of cold that retards the ripening and the decay. The ripening springs forward with unusual rapidity as soon as a fruit is picked, and as the air of the car is moist from the transpiration of the fruit the conditions are favorable to the rapid development of decay. In a refrigerator car the fruit is cooled by a slow gravity circulation of air from the ice bunkers. The temperature of the air as it leaves the bunkers may fall as low as 34 degrees F. It is warmed by contact with the fruit and grows warmer as it ascends and re-enters the ice bunkers of the car. The temperature of the top of the car is several degrees warmer than in the bottom during the first part of the trip, but this difference gradually grows less as the fruit becomes cold. These are the fundamental difficulties in the present methods of handling perishable fruits. They limit the distribution of fruit to the area over which the top tiers of packages can be safely shipped, thereby preventing the development of the most distant domestic and foreign markets. They make it necessary to harvest the summer fruits prematurely to provide against the ripening that takes place in transit, thereby placing large quantities of insipid, flavorless peaches, plums and other fruits before the consumers."

The pre-cooling process reduces the temperature of the fruit quickly to a degree which effectually stops ripening and decay, and if the car is then iced, losses from decay in transit are effectually stopped. However, Mr. Powell emphasizes in the strongest terms that no pre-cooling or refrigeration system can take the place of the care in handling necessary to start the fruit on its way to market in perfect condition.


Re: EJE 7300-series rebuilt boxcar details

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Sep 3, 2011, at 3:47 PM, cloggydog wrote:

Hi folks,

sat on my workbench at the moment is a modified Tichy USRA DS steel
rebuild - I've smoothed the kit sides down and rescored with 10
panels using Archer rivet decals to finish, scratchbuilt 3-panel
Creco doors and it's riding on an Accurail DS fishbelly chassis
with Andrews trucks. A set of Jerry Glow's decals for the all-over
green scheme are in hand.

But I'm struggling to find out what running board type was used,
steel (of which type) or wood?? The USRA DS spreadsheet in the
files area notes everything but the running board type and none of
the limited number of pics I've been able to track down show the
roof clearly enough to be certain.
Depends on when you're modeling the car. The early photos I have
show wood running boards, but later ones show Morton steel running
boards.
Also, the green scheme included the ends and roof, correct??
Yes.


Richard Hendrickson


EJE 7300-series rebuilt boxcar details

cloggydog <Alan.Monk@...>
 

Hi folks,

sat on my workbench at the moment is a modified Tichy USRA DS steel rebuild - I've smoothed the kit sides down and rescored with 10 panels using Archer rivet decals to finish, scratchbuilt 3-panel Creco doors and it's riding on an Accurail DS fishbelly chassis with Andrews trucks. A set of Jerry Glow's decals for the all-over green scheme are in hand.

But I'm struggling to find out what running board type was used, steel (of which type) or wood?? The USRA DS spreadsheet in the files area notes everything but the running board type and none of the limited number of pics I've been able to track down show the roof clearly enough to be certain.

Also, the green scheme included the ends and roof, correct??

Any confirmation of the above would be muchly appreciated.

TIA,
Alan
Reading, UK


Eggs in reefers

Allen Rueter
 

Yep, eggs were shipped by rail,

http://yesteryear.clunette.com/winonadarr.html
"...It was the Winona that helped make Mentone famous for its egg
production. Eggs were brought from farms to Mentone where they were loaded into
Winona refrigerator cars located on a siding track on South Morgan St.  The
Winona then interchanged the cars with the Wabash Railroad for the trip to New
York for distribution.  It is estimated that an average of eight to 10
cars, with a peak of 20 carloads of eggs were shipped each week."
--
Allen Rueter
StLouis MO


________________________________
From: Peter Ness <prness@roadrunner.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, September 2, 2011 5:57 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: FGE in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New York


 
Bill,

8<
Commodities in the New Haven region (at least into the '50's); cranberries, fish, apples, pears, corn, tomatoes, berries (straw, rasp, blue and black in addition to cran) poultry...were eggs shipped by rail?

I'm getting hungry.

Regards,
Peter Ness

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Painting underframes

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tony Wagner wrote:
I actually use roof brown (it dries pretty dark) and on truck side frames sometimes highlights of either grimy black or freight car color, but very lightly . . . in the color photos I have and have seen plus my own observations of real equipment the brownish color on running gear is pretty universal with little variation as opposed to superstructure weathering which is caused by quite different
circumstances.
I would agree with the brownish tone, and not only underframes. I would point out that this color is very evident on light-colored superstructures such as reefers. Many color photos of SFRD and PFE reefers show a brownish tinge to the weathering, which is easy to duplicate with either airbrush or acrylic wash weathering.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


ORER Help

Gene Semon
 

Gentlemen,

I am trying to tiw down a few early American Refrigerator Tranist Company cars for the final roster in my book. It's amazing how one picture or note can cause a great ripple effect in the early years.

Would anyone be able to help me with scans of the A.R.T. sections in these ORERs years?

1935, 1936, 1937, 1938 & 1939?

If so, please contact me off list at mopac1@classicnet.net

Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

Gene Semon


For Sale Sunshine D&RGW gon kit

brianleppert@att.net
 

For Sale: Sunshine Models Kit #67.14, HO scale D&RGW 40' Fixed End Gon, with Pressed Steel Ends. $40.00 plus shipping. If interested, please contact OFF-LIST at

brianleppert@att.net

Brian Leppert
Carson City, NV


Re: Challenging Kits to build

Eric Hansmann
 

While I have not yet hit a dozen resin kits assembled, the most challenging so far is the Funaro & Camerlengo Erie horizontal-rib hopper. Construction pushed me to several creative applications for hardware details that were crude or not mentioned in the instructions.

Thinking through the processes and not pushing myself to do too much at one sitting were key elements to the progress. With complex resin kit builds, we tend to push into a mentally tired state and make poor choices or flub because we have already processed lots of info. I've learned to put the tools down and walk away for an hour if my frustration level builds. It is amazing how different a project can look after walking the dogs a mile or two.

Eric



Eric Hansmann
New Paltz, NY


Re: FGE in Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New York

Eric Hansmann
 

I recently moved to the outskirts of New Paltz, New York and the New Haven's Maybrook Line was just a mile or so from the home. Upon reading a book on the Poughkeepsie Bridge, it seems apples and grapes were shipped out along a few stops between the Bridge and Maybrook Yard. This would be from Ulster County towns of Clintondale, Modena, and possibly St. Elmo. The text does note that many shipments moved to truck transport after the Depression.

Eric



Eric Hansmann
New Paltz, NY


Re: Painting underframes

Tim O'Connor
 

Jack Spencer paints the wood floors a new wood color on many of his
models before he starts weathering! I've seen many photos of overturned
box cars and some have clean wood, some show repairs (new and old
floor boards), and some show dirt spattered unevenly so you can see
cleaner areas in addition to filth, especially where wheel spray applies.

Tim O'Connor


So, bottom line, if striving for completely accuracy, you might consider
painting the bottom of the floor boards a weathered grimy wood color ;^)
Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: Painting underframes

Andy Sperandeo
 

The Pentrex video "Railfanning Southern California in the 1950s" includes a sequence of a Santa Fe train climbing around the first curve above Cajon station, on the approach to the horseshoe that became known as Sullivan's Curve. Shot from a low angle, after the point helper and road engine pass you can see under the passing cars to the mid-train and rear-end pushers as they approach and enter the curve. But if you pay attention to the cars in the foreground you get a great closeup look at weathered underbodies. My friend Keith Jordan pointed out that the predominant underbody color throughout this train was something pretty close to Floquil Rail Brown, whether or not the original paint was black or some other carbody color.

I paint my car underbodies pretty much as Richard described, using black to denote newer cars and the body color when appropriate for cars that would have been repainted by 1947. But after watching that video, I use a Polly Scale spray approximating Rail Brown to weather over the original underbody color. Applied in varying degrees, sometimes this leaves the original color apparent and sometimes it doesn't.

So long,

Andy


Re: Painting underframes

anthony wagner
 

I actually use roof brown (it dries pretty dark) and on truck side frames
sometimes highlights of either grimy black or freight car color, but very
lightly. You are correct that not all dirt is of equal hue but in the color
photos I have and have seen plus my own observations of real equipment the
brownish color on running gear is pretty universal with little variation as
opposed to superstructure weathering which is caused by quite different
circumstances. Tony Wagner





________________________________
From: Armand Premo <armprem2@surfglobal.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sat, September 3, 2011 5:16:41 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting underframes


You are correct,"dirt is dirt",but not all dirt is alike.There are many factors
that should be taken into consideration when weathering.For instance ,region,
climate ,type of service, age of car,type of car. are just a few examples.Not
all roadbed is the same nor car servicing practices.This subject will be debated
ad nauseum.IMO you would be doing yourself a disservice by painting all
underbodies weathered black.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
From: anthony wagner
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, September 02, 2011 10:35 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Painting underframes

I got into a discussion with another modeler about underframe colors and we
consulted his collection of books that featured color photos from the steam era.

As others have noted, unless a car was new the prevailing color of trucks
wheels, and visible parts of the underframe was a sort of dark brown color. This

was true of the track too including rail, ties, and ballast, unless it was
fairly fresh, , and none of it was not rust color which is too bright. I also
spent some time watching numerous freight trains near where I live and the cars,

unless they are pretty new, show the same brownish underbody and running gear
coloration as in the photos that were taken 50 to 70 or more years ago. Dirt is
dirt, then or now. For my own freight car models I automatically paint the
trucks, wheels, underframe (except on tank cars) and couplers "roof brown", but
the rest of the car is weathered using photo examples from heavy to light to
represent the passage of time from last full repaint (not just reweighing). In
looking at photos, both color and B&W, I have noticed that coal hoppers seemed
to get get really, really grungy, more so than most other types of cars with, of

course the usual exceptions. I model the late steam era, 1949, and suspect that
a lot of the superstructure weathering of that time was due to smoke and cinders

since in later photos when the power is all diesel the cars seem to be less
sooty even though they may still be dirty. Or is it my imagination? Tony Wagner

________________________________
From: Nelson Moyer <ku0a@mchsi.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Fri, September 2, 2011 8:23:44 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Painting underframes

I paint the underside of my freight cars and trucks the same color that the
prototype did when that information is available. For the CB&Q, that was
usually mineral red (a.k.a. Indian red) overall, including trucks for box
car, stock cars, gondolas, and way cars during the steam era. I use chalk,
drybrush, and airbrush for most weathering effects, depending upon the type
and age of the car and type of service. I like the idea of being to achieve
different weathering effects on new car paint, rather than starting with a
generic grimy black underside, which tends to produce too much uniformity
among cars.

Nelson Moyer

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John
F. Cizmar
Sent: Friday, September 02, 2011 3:41 PM
To: Steam Freight Cars
Subject: [STMFC] Painting underframes

What is the consensus regarding painting the underside of steam era freight
cars? To date, I've painted all grimy black with a touch to a blast of
"earthy" weathering.
John F. Cizmar





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