Date   

Tangent Scale Models: All-NEW HO Bethlehem Steel 70-ton Gondola available today!

Tangent Scale Models
 

Tangent Scale Models is pleased to announce the availability today of the Bethlehem Steel Company 52’6� 70-ton drop-end riveted gondola car as the fifth ALL-NEW model in our HO scale product line. Our HO scale precision models cater to steam, steam-transition, and diesel era modelers with original delivery schemes from Bethlehem Steel, as well as repaint offerings!

Our new gondola is available now in these RTR schemes:

- Baltimore & Ohio (B&O) Class O-59 in the original 1937 paint scheme with white stencils on a black carbody, available in 12 road numbers.

- Lehigh Valley (LV) in the 1973 repaint “Cornell red�, available in 6 road numbers.

- Western Maryland (WM) painted in the original 1953 red scheme, available in 6 road numbers.

- Undecorated RTR (with kits available December 1)

Want to see photos of our new spectacular replicas? See http://tangentscalemodels.com/bethlehem70tongondolareplicas.aspx for a link to the new models!

First produced in March 1937 for Baltimore & Ohio Railroad as class O-59, B&O alone purchased 4,000 of these drop-end gondolas which served every corner of North America in many services. Five additional railroads purchased these Bethlehem-design gondolas in intervening years until production ceased in 1957. Most of these gondolas were phased from revenue service by the mid-1980s, with many serving additional years in various MOW roles.

The Tangent Scale Models prototype replica of the Bethlehem Steel gondola has never been produced in HO scale as a styrene model, making it a distinctive addition to any freight car fleet. And as typical of our products, we take the time to focus on execution of all the small details. We studied the prototype to accurately reproduce it with the following features:
- Dimensional accuracy - scaled exactly from Bethlehem Steel plans
- Highly accurate “true to life� colors
- Exact stencils and lettering placement - compare our replicas to the prototype photos on our website!
- Detail variations: Tie downs appropriate for each paint scheme
- Detail variations: Steel or wood deck inside the car
- Detail variations: Duryea and conventional end sill detail appropriate for each paint scheme
- Detail variations: Tack board locations appropriate for each paint scheme
- Detail variations: End door variations (Dreadnaught and Straight Corrugated) appropriate for each paint scheme
- Detail variations: Brake platforms appropriate for each paint scheme
- Detail variations: Road-specific handbrakes applied to match production specifications (Universal, Ajax, or Equipco handbrakes available as separate parts, too!)
- Interior deck sits at the scale height
- Interior detail inside the gondola
- Wire grab irons and coupler lift bars
- Air hoses
- Weighted to NMRA specs for smooth operation
- Kadee® scale metal couplers
- Tangent 70-ton ASF A-3 Ride-Control trucks with free-rolling metal wheels
- Recommended age 14 years and older.

Our new gondola continues to come with the well-executed Tangent Scale Models 70-ton ASF A-3 Ride-Control trucks with free-rolling all-metal wheels. Our ready-to-operate replica is finished with coupler lift bars accompanying Kadee® scale couplers and sufficient hidden weights to ensure the model operates as good as it looks.

Pricing for our new RTR gondolas is $32.95 each, and we offer discounts for quantities of 6, 12, and 24 models. Feel free to “mix and matchâ€� your own multi-scheme order, and you can “mix and matchâ€� with our previously released ACF Gondolas â€" currently available in PRR (2 flavors), SP (3 flavors), Wabash (2 flavors), and Undecorated.

These cars are available for sale right now. Please order online from us today from www.tangentscalemodels.com for fastest, guaranteed shipping. You may also call us at 828-279-6106 to place an order over the phone.

Thank you for continuing to support Tangent Scale Models!

David Lehlbach
Tangent Scale Models
“Unparalleled scale replicas for discriminating railroad modelers�
www.tangentscalemodels.com
info@tangentscalemodels.com
PO Box 6514
Asheville NC 28816
828-279-6106


Re: Warped Plastic Gondola

Benjamin Hom
 

Paul Hillman wrote:
"Well, I'll be durned!!! I finally found the small manufacturer name in the
car's

underframe, covered with some paint. It was made by, "Bachmann - Made in
Taiwan"."

Paul, thanks.  I had forgotten about the Bachmann version of this model.
http://ho-scaletrains.net/bachmannhoscalerollingstock/id37.html


"In my quick, initial measurements, the ends, width and length are close to the
prototype, but the sides appear about 8 inches too tall at 5ft-0 in, instead of
4 ft - 4 in. The C&EI Dwg. calls the prototype a, "LOW-SIDE STEEL GONDOLA".
<<snip>>
But, for reference, the proto-dwgs. show:

42 ft - 7 1/8 in Length - Over Striking castings
7 ft - 3 3/4 in Height - Above railhead
31 ft - 0 in Truck Centers
3 ft - 9 3/8 in Railhead to Top of Floor
10 ft - 5 in Width - Over Chords"

8 inches is a lot, but this does present a use for this model, much as we got
some extra mileage from the Tyco gon by cutting it down in height to model 40 ft
D&H gons and their copies on the NEB&W roster.  If the rest of the details and
dimensions are close, it's an esay matter to do the same to the
Varney/Life-Like/AHM/Mehano/Walthers/Bachmann... 40 ft gon.


"Isn't it "illegal" to scan the C&EI HS magazine and post it, etc.? But I think
if you want to contact Bob McQuown at the C&EIHS he would be glad to provide the

prototype drawings, at: president@ceihs.org<mailto:president@ceihs.org>"

Without permission, it certainly is.  Besides, I'm certainly OK with purchasing
a copy of the issue in question from the society - after doing enough of this
stuff for free, the least I could do is kick $12 plus shipping to the C&EI
Society for the effort to publish this work.


"Maybe the C&EI had another series of gons even closer to this Bachmann model.
(They had several different series.) But, if this one will work, and with the
"free" or inexpensive offers you've all made, I could build a large fleet of
them."

Just give the word!  Not only do I have some extras in the morgue, I can scare
up more from the basement in Davision Hall that can be had for a donation to the
club.


Ben Hom


Re: Warped Plastic Gondola

Paul Hillman
 

Well, I'll be durned!!! I finally found the small manufacturer name in the car's underframe, covered with some paint. It was made by, "Bachmann - Made in Taiwan".

In my quick, initial measurements, the ends, width and length are close to the prototype, but the sides appear about 8 inches too tall at 5ft-0 in, instead of 4 ft - 4 in. The C&EI Dwg. calls the prototype a, "LOW-SIDE STEEL GONDOLA".

Isn't it "illegal" to scan the C&EI HS magazine and post it, etc.? But I think if you want to contact Bob McQuown at the C&EIHS he would be glad to provide the prototype drawings, at: president@ceihs.org<mailto:president@ceihs.org>

But, for reference, the proto-dwgs. show:

42 ft - 7 1/8 in Length - Over Striking castings
7 ft - 3 3/4 in Height - Above railhead
31 ft - 0 in Truck Centers
3 ft - 9 3/8 in Railhead to Top of Floor
10 ft - 5 in Width - Over Chords

Maybe the C&EI had another series of gons even closer to this Bachmann model. (They had several different series.) But, if this one will work, and with the "free" or inexpensive offers you've all made, I could build a large fleet of them.

Thanks to all,

Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: Benjamin Hom<mailto:b.hom@att.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, October 18, 2011 11:27 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Warped Plastic Gondola



Tim added:
“I am amazed you found a prototype for the model! :-)”

I am too. We’ve been looking for years for a prototype for this model, and I’m
a bit skeptical about Paul’s call on this one. I’ll have to pick a copy of the
reference and see for myself.

Ben Hom


URMX reporting numbers/leasees.

Jason Kliewer
 

Does any one know who the leesee(s) was for URMX reefers #40068-#40741. I model 1968 and I have a train list from 1965. The URMX reporting marks were discontinued by '68 but I would like to know who the leesee was and maybe make a replacement car.


Thank you for any help.


Jason Kliewer
Colorado Springs, CO


Re: Model Identification - RPM East 2010

mici256751
 

Ben & Eric,

I can confirm that B&O 380890 and 380554 should, indeed, be credited to Keith DeVault. Keith and I traveled together to RPM 2010 and those cars traveled there with us, too.

Jim Kubanick,
Morgantown WV

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Eric" <eric@...> wrote:

Ben,

I don't think Keith DeVault attended the 2010 RPM East event. He lives closer to Pittsburgh and has been to the 2009 and 2011 events.

Eric


Eric Hansmann
now in New Paltz, NY!


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@> wrote:

Dennis Williams wrote:
"The B&Os look to be Eric Thur's cars."

ALL of them?  There was more than one modeler there exhibiting B&O boxcars.


"I know he will be at Lisle this weekend."

Thanks.  Unfortunately, I will not be there, but will be in Troy NY instead to
knock out some work on the NEB&W and take part in RPI Reunion and Homecoming
Weekend.


Ben Hom


Re: Warped Plastic Gondola

PennsyNut <pennsynut@...>
 

To All
As for my curiosity, I only posted because there may be hundreds of
those warped plastic kits (like the ECW) lying around in someones work
"to be done" piles. And as I tried to say - Post examples of something
that worked - stating the mfgr, your exact method, etc.
I had tried that hair dryer once and never again. LOL It certainly
sounds logical that an oven is a waste of time, and kind of dangerous,
since it's non discriminatory as to what is heated. The hair dryer does
localize the heat. Boiling water sounds relatively easy because you can
watch it. But again, I ask only for tried and true methods.
But more than any of this, thanks to all who input suggestions and
certainly, Ben, for a very generous offer to Paul?
And as for time. Time is relative. Some people have more than others.
Now, if anyone has any extra, send it my way. Or Ben's. LOL*
*Morgan Bilbo Ferroequinologist SPF PRRTHS #1204


Re: Model Identification - RPM East 2010

Benjamin Hom
 

Eric Hansmann wrote:
"I don't think Keith DeVault attended the 2010 RPM East event. He lives closer
to

Pittsburgh and has been to the 2009 and 2011 events."

I'd agree with you, but the photos have a date tag of March 2010, the display
room is definitely not one of the ones at Greensburg, and I took a reference
photo of a title card with Keith's name on it.


Ben Hom


Re: Model Identification - RPM East 2010

Eric Hansmann
 

Ben,

I don't think Keith DeVault attended the 2010 RPM East event. He lives closer to Pittsburgh and has been to the 2009 and 2011 events.

Eric


Eric Hansmann
now in New Paltz, NY!

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:

Dennis Williams wrote:
"The B&Os look to be Eric Thur's cars."

ALL of them?  There was more than one modeler there exhibiting B&O boxcars.


"I know he will be at Lisle this weekend."

Thanks.  Unfortunately, I will not be there, but will be in Troy NY instead to
knock out some work on the NEB&W and take part in RPI Reunion and Homecoming
Weekend.


Ben Hom


Re: Model Identification - RPM East 2010

Benjamin Hom
 

Dennis Williams wrote:
"The B&Os look to be Eric Thur's cars."

ALL of them?  There was more than one modeler there exhibiting B&O boxcars.


"I know he will be at Lisle this weekend."

Thanks.  Unfortunately, I will not be there, but will be in Troy NY instead to
knock out some work on the NEB&W and take part in RPI Reunion and Homecoming
Weekend.


Ben Hom


Re: Warped Plastic Gondola

rwitt_2000
 

Paul Hillman wrote: "(This was all mentioned in the C&EIHS Volume 29:1
"Flyer" Magazine
along with scale dwgs. of the prototype.)"
Tim O'Connor replied: (snip) "I am amazed you found a prototype for
the model! :-)"
I recall an article published in the model railroad press about
converting these generic gondola models, AAR class GB, with 8-panels
into general service gondolas, AAR class GS. I cannot recall the
specific reference possibly RMC.

Bob Witt


Re: Model Identification - RPM East 2010

Dennis Williams
 

Ben.

The B&Os look to be Eric Thur's cars.
You can contact him through this group or the "resin freight cars" group.

I know he will be at Lisle this weekend.

Dennis Williams/Owner

www.resinbuilders4u.com


________________________________
From: Benjamin Hom <b.hom@att.net>
To: stmfc@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, October 18, 2011 7:50 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Model Identification - RPM East 2010


All,

Catching up on organizing files and found a number of rolling stock model photos
that I took at the RPM East meet in 2010.  Unfortunately, I misplaced my notes
and need help properly crediting these models.  Pending approval, I've uploaded
them to the Photos section of the group in the file "RPM East 2010 - ID
Needed".  Thanks in advance for the assist!

Ben Hom



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Warped Plastic Gondola

Benjamin Hom
 

Paul Hillman wrote:
“How this all started is; ....Athearn is offering a C&EI, 95300-95399 series
C&EI gondola. It is generally accurate only in car-type numbering, otherwise
it's "generic". The model has 10 panels and the prototype car had only 8,
side-panels. (This was all mentioned in the C&EIHS Volume 29:1 "Flyer" Magazine
along with scale dwgs. of the prototype.)


I noticed, then, that I have this old gondola sitting here which has the correct
8 panels, and all of the dimensions are pretty close to the prototype dwgs.,
except for the "slight" warp it developed over the years. (Don't know when I
acquired it.)”

Tim O'Connor replied:
“Paul, I thought every AHM car said AHM in the tooling, so you should not have
to guess.”
 
True, but this is one of those models that have been copied time and time
again.  Versions of this 40 ft, 8-panel gon model with Dreadnaught ends have
been offered by Varney, Life-Like, AHM, and Walthers, and a couple of AHM/IHC
successor firms that I don’t recall at the moment.  I think the Varney car was
probably first, but I'll have to work the advertising timelines, and frankly,
that's not high on the priority list.  
 
 
“I agree with Ben it's probably not worth the energy to heat the oven to fix as
you can probably find a free replacement from almost anywhere.”
 
I wasn’t kidding – if you really want to do this project, I’ll send you a
replacement model for free.  It really isn’t worth fixing the shell you have
unless you want to satisfy Bilbo’s curiosity on fixing warped shells.
 
(BTW, I’ve had success with using both boiling water and a heat gun – an
inexpensive industrial-grade one I picked up at Fry’s years go which has more
“oomph” than a hair dryer.  The key is working slowly and carefully.  Dennis is
correct – the oven is a bad solution for styrene.  I once had a number of
slightly warped Tichy running boards which I tried to straighten in the oven. 
They turned into cooked spaghetti.)
 
 
Tim added:
“I am amazed you found a prototype for the model! :-)”
 
I am too.  We’ve been looking for years for a prototype for this model, and I’m
a bit skeptical about Paul’s call on this one.  I’ll have to pick a copy of the
reference and see for myself.



Ben Hom


Re: Steam era track and CVT Tie strips.

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Not the 50s Brian, but the best I can do with authentic ERIE information:
ELHS sells a small booklet titled ERIE R.R.

M. OF W. & S.



44 pages plus paper covers, 4.25" x 5.5", it's a feasible reproduction of a
booklet I picked up at some show, which had a leather cover and a multi-ring
binder. It has all sorts of grading profile and superelevation information,
and in ONE place, it gives the dimension of the standard tie: 8'-6".



That's for 1927. I'm guessing that they may have been 9'-0" later. But at
least you now know that they were not 8'-0".



No reason for moderate jail here, these ties supported Steam Era Freight
Cars, didn't they?



SGL



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Brian Carlson
Sent: Sunday, October 16, 2011 5:50 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Steam era track and CVT Tie strips.





Thanks, this won't be as simple as I thought. Pennsy has 8'-6" ties based on
some documents I was directed to. Now to find out what the Erie had in their
specs. Since my original post was only marginally on topic, I don't want to
risk Moderate jail again so if anyone has information on Erie track
practices in the 50's contact me OFF LIST Thanks.

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga, NY

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf
Of
Richard Hendrickson
Sent: Sunday, October 16, 2011 5:37 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Steam era track and CVT Tie strips.

On Oct 16, 2011, at 12:44 PM, Brian Carlson wrote:

I want to try handlaying some track using CVT Tie strips. They
offer both
8'-6" and 9'-0" mainline tie length. 210-2001 which are 9 ft ties, and
210-2003 8'-6" ties which of these, if either, are more
prototypical for the
steam era. My steam era freight cars need someplace to run.
Brian, different railroad had different standards for crossties.
It's hard to know what standard practice would have been on the
railroad you're modeling. On the Santa Fe, 9' hardwood ties were
required on all main line trackage. On secondary trackage, 8' ties
were used on tangents, 9' ties on all curves of one degree or more.
Branch lines got 8' ties.

Richard Hendrickson












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Re: Warped Plastic Gondola

Tim O'Connor
 

I got in big trouble with my Dad as a kid when I applied generous
quantities of Testors' styrene cement to the interior of a gondola,
possibly an AHM gondola -- I was fascinated by how the glue caused
the sides of the car to bend inwards and the floor to warp upwards.
I proudly showed it off to Dad (it was his model) and that's when
the trouble started... I recall that it was green, lettered for EJ&E.

Tim O'Connor

Injection molded parts are a whole 'nother animal. They were molded under extreme pressure (up to 30,000psi) and then frozen in place to the shape of the mold. Heating an injection molded part is just asking to have it turn into something resembling either a banana, or a strip of bacon. LOCALIZED heating can be used to bend a part... the theory behind deforming gon panels and the like. But overall heating can yield some really unpredictable results. The best bet is to grasp the ends of the part, and play the center ober the hot air from a hair drier... when it yields, STOP, and see if it will stay when it cools. Then quit. Overall heating will not yield good results.

Dennis


Re: Warped Plastic Gondola

Tim O'Connor
 

Paul, I thought every AHM car said AHM in the tooling, so you should
not have to guess. I have a plastic box in the basement with about 100
car bodies including AHM, Revell, Mantua and Tyco gondolas... I agree
with Ben it's probably not worth the energy to heat the oven to fix
as you can probably find a free replacement from almost anywhere. I
am amazed you found a prototype for the model! :-)

Tim O'Connor

Thanks for the "replacement" offer and advice. This model I have is an all steel version. I'm guessing it's an AHM car.

How this all started is; ....Athearn is offering a C&EI, 95300-95399 series C&EI gondola. It is generally accurate only in car-type numbering, otherwise it's "generic". The model has 10 panels and the prototype car had only 8, side-panels. (This was all mentioned in the C&EIHS Volume 29:1 "Flyer" Magazine along with scale dwgs. of the prototype.)

I noticed, then, that I have this old gondola sitting here which has the correct 8 panels, and all of the dimensions are pretty close to the prototype dwgs., except for the "slight" warp it developed over the years. (Don't know when I acquired it.)

It would be a "simple" matter of rebuilding it. I like "kit-bashing" and super-detailing stuff. Also, I am quite nostalgic about these "old" cars that I have which can be made into good models. That's a great amount of "fun" for me in this hobby.

I can send photos of the car but I think it's salvageable if the "warp" can be removed.

Paul Hillman



----- Original Message -----
From: Benjamin Hom<mailto:b.hom@att.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, October 18, 2011 4:25 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Warped Plastic Gondola



Paul Hillman asked:
"I have an older HO 40ft plastic drop-bottom gondola (AHM maybe) that I want to
re-detail and letter for the C&EI.

The problem is it developed an upwards hump/warp in the middle. The whole car
body warped up about 3/32", while packed away for a long spell.

I think I remember it mentioned on this list about how to heat-up a plastic car
like this and re-flatten it out, like in an oven at 100 deg.? maybe?

Any suggestions about how to do this correctly? I don't want to wind up with a
melted experimentation on my own."

Paul, can you post pictures of the model? The real first step is to see if it's
worth salvaging - if it's the old AHM 40 ft gon, I'll be happy to send you a
replacement. If it's an older HO scale plastic composite drop-bottom gon, it's
not an AHM model, but the old Walthers USRA composite gon.

Ben Hom


Re: Warped Plastic Gondola

Paul Hillman
 

Ben,

Thanks for the "replacement" offer and advice. This model I have is an all steel version. I'm guessing it's an AHM car.

How this all started is; ....Athearn is offering a C&EI, 95300-95399 series C&EI gondola. It is generally accurate only in car-type numbering, otherwise it's "generic". The model has 10 panels and the prototype car had only 8, side-panels. (This was all mentioned in the C&EIHS Volume 29:1 "Flyer" Magazine along with scale dwgs. of the prototype.)

I noticed, then, that I have this old gondola sitting here which has the correct 8 panels, and all of the dimensions are pretty close to the prototype dwgs., except for the "slight" warp it developed over the years. (Don't know when I acquired it.)

It would be a "simple" matter of rebuilding it. I like "kit-bashing" and super-detailing stuff. Also, I am quite nostalgic about these "old" cars that I have which can be made into good models. That's a great amount of "fun" for me in this hobby.

I can send photos of the car but I think it's salvageable if the "warp" can be removed.

Paul Hillman

----- Original Message -----
From: Benjamin Hom<mailto:b.hom@att.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, October 18, 2011 4:25 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Warped Plastic Gondola



Paul Hillman asked:
"I have an older HO 40ft plastic drop-bottom gondola (AHM maybe) that I want to
re-detail and letter for the C&EI.

The problem is it developed an upwards hump/warp in the middle. The whole car
body warped up about 3/32", while packed away for a long spell.

I think I remember it mentioned on this list about how to heat-up a plastic car
like this and re-flatten it out, like in an oven at 100 deg.? maybe?

Any suggestions about how to do this correctly? I don't want to wind up with a
melted experimentation on my own."

Paul, can you post pictures of the model? The real first step is to see if it's
worth salvaging - if it's the old AHM 40 ft gon, I'll be happy to send you a
replacement. If it's an older HO scale plastic composite drop-bottom gon, it's
not an AHM model, but the old Walthers USRA composite gon.

Ben Hom


Lisle speaker schedule

Bill Welch
 


Model Identification - RPM East 2010

Benjamin Hom
 

All,

Catching up on organizing files and found a number of rolling stock model photos
that I took at the RPM East meet in 2010.  Unfortunately, I misplaced my notes
and need help properly crediting these models.  Pending approval, I've uploaded
them to the Photos section of the group in the file "RPM East 2010 - ID
Needed".  Thanks in advance for the assist!


Ben Hom


Re: Warped Plastic Gondola

al_brown03
 

I've straightened out a scratchbuilt styrene boxcar roof, which had warped (due to too much glue on one side), by putting it in a pan of water and bringing it to the boil. I kept it at the boil maybe a minute before turning off the heat. Then I put the roof between paper towels on a flat surface (as if the roof were a strip of bacon), and flattened it with a weight. The roof didn't straighten out completely, but close enough that I could attach it to the car with cement and a few pins.

A gondola is a different shape, of course, which you'd need to enforce somehow. I wouldn't expect it to spontaneously re-assume its original shape. I'm tempted by the thought of removing the car from the hot water, inserting a wood block of the desired dimensions, clamping as necessary, and letting the assembly cool; but that's speculation.

-- fwiw --

-- Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, PennsyNut <pennsynut@...> wrote:

On 18,10 2011 17:14 PM, soolinehistory wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>,
"behillman" <chris_hillman@> wrote:
I think I remember it mentioned on this list about how to heat-up a
plastic car like this and re-flatten it out, like in an oven at 100
deg.? maybe?
Any suggestions about how to do this correctly? I don't want to wind
up with a melted experimentation on my own.
Thanks, Paul Hillman
from Dennis Storzek

The danger isn't melting the kit... injection molded styrene needs to
go north of 420* F before it will actually liquefy. The danger is it
will warp worse.....snip....Injection molded parts are a whole 'nother
animal. They were molded under extreme pressure (up to 30,000psi) and
then frozen in place to the shape of the mold. Heating an injection
molded part is just asking to have it turn into something resembling
either a banana, or a strip of bacon. LOCALIZED heating can be used to
bend a part... the theory behind deforming gon panels and the like.
But overall heating can yield some really unpredictable results. The
best bet is to grasp the ends of the part, and play the center ober
the hot air from a hair drier... when it yields, STOP, and see if it
will stay when it cools. Then quit. Overall heating will not yield
good results.
Dennis
So, let me interject a thought: Is there anyone who has done this sort
of thing? I did try a hair drier once and failed. But that was a
different material. There are so many different kinds of plastics. Look
at all the trouble removing paint.
And I'll bet there are many with ECW kits with warped roofs. Will those
straighten out with your technique? So, again I ask for specific results
from someone who has actually fixed a plastic kit? Details are nice. And
are always helpful for beginners as well as old timers.
Morgan Bilbo, Ferroequinologist and Pennsy Fan!



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Warped Plastic Gondola

PennsyNut <pennsynut@...>
 

On 18,10 2011 17:14 PM, soolinehistory wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>,
"behillman" <chris_hillman@...> wrote:
I think I remember it mentioned on this list about how to heat-up a
plastic car like this and re-flatten it out, like in an oven at 100
deg.? maybe?
Any suggestions about how to do this correctly? I don't want to wind
up with a melted experimentation on my own.
Thanks, Paul Hillman
from Dennis Storzek

The danger isn't melting the kit... injection molded styrene needs to
go north of 420* F before it will actually liquefy. The danger is it
will warp worse.....snip....Injection molded parts are a whole 'nother
animal. They were molded under extreme pressure (up to 30,000psi) and
then frozen in place to the shape of the mold. Heating an injection
molded part is just asking to have it turn into something resembling
either a banana, or a strip of bacon. LOCALIZED heating can be used to
bend a part... the theory behind deforming gon panels and the like.
But overall heating can yield some really unpredictable results. The
best bet is to grasp the ends of the part, and play the center ober
the hot air from a hair drier... when it yields, STOP, and see if it
will stay when it cools. Then quit. Overall heating will not yield
good results.
Dennis
So, let me interject a thought: Is there anyone who has done this sort
of thing? I did try a hair drier once and failed. But that was a
different material. There are so many different kinds of plastics. Look
at all the trouble removing paint.
And I'll bet there are many with ECW kits with warped roofs. Will those
straighten out with your technique? So, again I ask for specific results
from someone who has actually fixed a plastic kit? Details are nice. And
are always helpful for beginners as well as old timers.
Morgan Bilbo, Ferroequinologist and Pennsy Fan!

84961 - 84980 of 188713