Date   

Re: trucks (was Bulkhead F-70-6 flat)

Tim O'Connor
 

Speaking of such, is there any obvious difference in appearance
between a 50 ton National Type B, and the 70 ton version? I have
noticed several cases where Type B's were applied to 70 ton gondolas.

I've been using the 50 ton versions.

Tim O'Connor

"Need" to be replaced? Depends entirely on your personal accuracy
standards. The fact is, MANY freight car trucks have as yet no model
equivalent, and in a number of cases, not even anything very close.
Are we to put the many cars without exactly correct trucks on shop
trucks on our workbench until the "right" trucks come along? My own
view is that you start by trying for the right general appearance. Of
course if the right trucks are in fact available I do tend to use
them, but some compromise is needed in many cases.
That said, i will comment that many 70-ton trucks are a little
bigger overall, many with longer wheelbase, and have a little bigger
journal boxes, than the corresponding 50-ton truck. A case can
certainly be made that 70-ton cars really should have 70-ton trucks.
But the differences are, in all candor, only really evident when the
trucks are next to each other. Again, it's all down to how meticulous
YOU choose to be on this issue.

Tony Thompson


Re: Bulkhead F-70-6 flat

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

...That said, i will comment that many 70-ton trucks are a little
bigger overall, many with longer wheelbase, and have a little bigger
journal boxes, than the corresponding 50-ton truck. A case can
certainly be made that 70-ton cars really should have 70-ton trucks.
But the differences are, in all candor, only really evident when the
trucks are next to each other. Again, it's all down to how meticulous
YOU choose to be on this issue.

Tony Thompson
Of course, of the model trucks available, the trucks that are "bigger" are often bigger because of draft issues rather than because they should be. Ditto with journal boxes.

In reality, the difference in external dimensions between the AAR standard 50 ton and 70 ton journal boxes is only 1/2" in any dimension... that's only .005" in HO scale and less than many model boxes vary by. The truck wheelbase should be 2" longer on the 70 ton truck, and the spring package should show 2-1/2 springs; that is the center spring partially shows between and behind the two outer springs. But, 50 ton trucks built after WWII also had this feature, so it's not a reliable spotting feature.

Anyone who needs an AAR 70 ton truck with spring plank need look no further than the Accurail "Bettendorf" truck, but of course that would be admitting it's not correct for all the 50 ton cars we put it under, so I won't suggest that.

Dennis


Re: Bulkhead F-70-6 flat

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jim Scott wrote:
Does that mean the trucks that are shipped with the cars, both the standard flats and the bulkhead flats, are incorrect and need to be replaced?
"Need" to be replaced? Depends entirely on your personal accuracy standards. The fact is, MANY freight car trucks have as yet no model equivalent, and in a number of cases, not even anything very close. Are we to put the many cars without exactly correct trucks on shop trucks on our workbench until the "right" trucks come along? My own view is that you start by trying for the right general appearance. Of course if the right trucks are in fact available I do tend to use them, but some compromise is needed in many cases.
That said, i will comment that many 70-ton trucks are a little bigger overall, many with longer wheelbase, and have a little bigger journal boxes, than the corresponding 50-ton truck. A case can certainly be made that 70-ton cars really should have 70-ton trucks. But the differences are, in all candor, only really evident when the trucks are next to each other. Again, it's all down to how meticulous YOU choose to be on this issue.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Tangent Models Bethlehem Gondola

Layout Tour
 

Thanks for all the feedback which I'll pass on to my friend. The Kadee
washer sounds like an easy fix. I know David is also planning to release
the car in the as built scheme for the Lehigh Valley which I'll also be
looking for.



Chuck


Re: [H0] Brake systemon D&RGW 40' autoboxc ar

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Nov 7, 2011, at 12:08 PM, <roland.levin@bredband.net> wrote:

I'm going to build two Sunshine kit's (#96.9) for 40' Autobox car
and four D&RGW 40' twelve panel box cars. I have a problem with the
construction of the brake system. The kits comes with one building
instruction for AAR 1942 and 10' IH 1944 boxcars and one Added
Modeling notes for the cars in question.

The building instructions shows an ordinary AB brake system bur the
Added Modeling notes shows a AB system with a Royal F slack
adjuster. I can't figure out how this brake systems works and I'm
unsure if the pictures in the in the modeling notes are correct.

Can anyone point me to a prototype photo of this type of brake
system or any other information that will show me how it works and
how it should be put together.
Roland, I'm sending you off-list a page from the 1940 Car Builders'
Cyclopedia which describes and illustrates the Royal F slack
adjuster. It should answer your questions.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Bulkhead F-70-6 flat

Paul Lyons
 

Not Close
Paul Lyons

-----Original Message-----
From: Andy Carlson <midcentury@sbcglobal.net>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Mon, Nov 7, 2011 10:49 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Bulkhead F-70-6 flat




How close is the Intermountain 70-ton truck for use on the SP F-70-6?

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

________________________________

Now I'm back to the opinion that the Barber truck (TMW 209) which I am looking
at as I type, is the closest in appearance, for now.

Ron Merrick


Tim O'Connor wrote:
Tony, none of the photos I've seen of the F-70-6 shows ASF A-3
trucks, including the photos in Volume 3. The F-70-7's (identical, I
believe) all had Barber S-2-A-0 trucks, according to the SP 1956
company roster.
The F-70-6 trucks do show spring planks, so the trucks were
different than the -7 class. I don't think there is a HO truck that
matches them exactly.








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [H0] Brake systemon D&RGW 40' autoboxc ar

gary laakso
 

You can find an excellent handout in the file section for the group, its called: Freight Car Underbody Detail by Gene Green. An illustration of a slack adjustor is on page 14. It was added to the files by Doug Harding on April 3, 2009.

Its one of my most used files! I keep it in a folder near my workshop desk.

gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
vasa0vasa@earthlink.net

----- Original Message -----
From:
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com;DRGW@yahoogroups.com
Sent: 11/7/2011 3:08:41 PM
Subject: [STMFC] [H0] Brake systemon D&RGW 40' autoboxc ar



Hi,

I'm going to build two Sunshine kit's (#96.9) for 40' Autobox car and four D&RGW 40' twelve panel box cars. I have a problem with the construction of the brake system. The kits comes with one building instruction for AAR 1942 and 10' IH 1944 boxcars and one Added Modeling notes for the cars in question.

The building instructions shows an ordinary AB brake system bur the Added Modeling notes shows a AB system with a Royal F slack adjuster. I can't figure out how this brake systems works and I'm unsure if the pictures in the in the modeling notes are correct.

Can anyone point me to a prototype photo of this type of brake system or any other information that will show me how it works and how it should be put together.

Sorry for cross posting this on two lists. I'm eager to get an answer and start building the kits.

Roland Levin
Stockholm, Sweden
http://hem.bredband.net/drgw
http://www.usms.se<http://www.usms.se/>

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Tarnished brass

Tim O'Connor
 

Denny

True, with the caveat that not all brass is the same -- brass
comes in many alloy forms with different oxidation properties.
Also, tarnish can come from contact with another material - I
just bought a tarnished brass model that looks like someone left
a key from a paint can lying on it for a long time. I plan to
grit blast the car.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/150685087107

But usually, you're right - tarnish disappears once the car is
painted. Unlike fingerprints! :-)

Tim O'

Unless shiny brass is a requirement for display purposes. However, the usual tarnish should be of no concern if the model is to painted; that is, if the usual routine common sense preparations for painting brass are otherwise undertaken.

As but several ad hoc personal examples, I have a number of NPP models whose tarnished exteriors have been painted, painted well, and have stood up for decades looking great.

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento


[H0] Brake systemon D&RGW 40' autoboxc ar

Roland Levin
 

Hi,

I'm going to build two Sunshine kit's (#96.9) for 40' Autobox car and four D&RGW 40' twelve panel box cars. I have a problem with the construction of the brake system. The kits comes with one building instruction for AAR 1942 and 10' IH 1944 boxcars and one Added Modeling notes for the cars in question.

The building instructions shows an ordinary AB brake system bur the Added Modeling notes shows a AB system with a Royal F slack adjuster. I can't figure out how this brake systems works and I'm unsure if the pictures in the in the modeling notes are correct.

Can anyone point me to a prototype photo of this type of brake system or any other information that will show me how it works and how it should be put together.

Sorry for cross posting this on two lists. I'm eager to get an answer and start building the kits.

Roland Levin
Stockholm, Sweden
http://hem.bredband.net/drgw
http://www.usms.se<http://www.usms.se/>


Re: Bulkhead F-70-6 flat

Tim O'Connor
 

Andy

If you mean the truck IM tooled for the ACF 1958 LO, then
it's probably closer than anything else - except for the ride
control wedges. But it has the spring plank and similar spring
pack and sideframe appearance. The top of the prototype trucks
aren't visible in the photos I've seen so it probably won't be
noticeable on the model either. :-)

Tahoe and Kadee have certainly spoiled me when it comes to fine
looking trucks... I only wish they each made about 10 more types!
We could use several more 70 ton, plain bearing trucks.

Tim O'

At 11/7/2011 01:48 PM Monday, you wrote:
How close is the Intermountain 70-ton truck for use on the SP F-70-6?

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

________________________________




Now I'm back to the opinion that the Barber truck (TMW 209) which I am looking
at as I type, is the closest in appearance, for now.

Ron Merrick



Tim O'Connor wrote:
Tony, none of the photos I've seen of the F-70-6 shows ASF A-3
trucks, including the photos in Volume 3. The F-70-7's (identical, I
believe) all had Barber S-2-A-0 trucks, according to the SP 1956
company roster.
The F-70-6 trucks do show spring planks, so the trucks were
different than the -7 class. I don't think there is a HO truck that
matches them exactly.


Re: WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO CERRO-BEND?

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...> wrote:


Does anyone know the status of Cerro-Bend and a current source of supply?
McMaster Carr carries all the different Cerro alloys. Go to www.mcmaster.com and search on "Low temperature melting alloys."


Re: Bulkhead F-70-6 flat

Andy Carlson
 

How close is the Intermountain 70-ton truck for use on the SP F-70-6?

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

________________________________




Now I'm back to the opinion that the Barber truck (TMW 209) which I am looking
at as I type, is the closest in appearance, for now.

Ron Merrick


Tim O'Connor wrote:
Tony, none of the photos I've seen of the F-70-6 shows ASF A-3
trucks, including the photos in Volume 3. The F-70-7's (identical, I
believe) all had Barber S-2-A-0 trucks, according to the SP 1956
company roster.
The F-70-6 trucks do show spring planks, so the trucks were
different than the -7 class. I don't think there is a HO truck that
matches them exactly.


Re: WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO CERRO-BEND?

john.allyn@...
 

Nashville TN ----- Original Message -----
From: "WILLIAM PARDIE" <PARDIEW001@HAWAII.RR.COM>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, November 7, 2011 12:37:24 PM
Subject: [STMFC] WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO CERRO-BEND?

 





Does anyone know the status of Cerro-Bend and a current source of supply? This material was heavily used back in
the 70's to add weight to model ocomotives and rolling stock. It has a very low melting point.All hobby shops carried it.
I had totally forgotten about this material but was reminded about it during a conversation at Lisle. I was talking about
milling out the backside of flat car center sills (Such as on the Chad Boas flat car) in order to add weight. The suggestion
was to pour Cerro-Bend into the groove. It sounded great, however, now I cannot find the product.

Again thanks in advance.

Bill Pardie




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO CERRO-BEND?

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Does anyone know the status of Cerro-Bend and a current source of supply? This material was heavily used back in
the 70's to add weight to model ocomotives and rolling stock. It has a very low melting point.All hobby shops carried it.
I had totally forgotten about this material but was reminded about it during a conversation at Lisle. I was talking about
milling out the backside of flat car center sills (Such as on the Chad Boas flat car) in order to add weight. The suggestion
was to pour Cerro-Bend into the groove. It sounded great, however, now I cannot find the product.

Again thanks in advance.

Bill Pardie


demand-based waybill operation

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

I've posted two descriptions of how I created freight car flow on my layout, based on shipper demand for cars. If you're interested, here's a link to the second of these posts (a link to the first one is at the beginning of this second post):

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2011/11/operations-demand-based-car-flow-2.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Bulkhead F-70-6 flat

mopacfirst
 

I find myself in an interesting position, maybe because I hit 'send' without reading the other posts.

Now I'm back to the opinion that the Barber truck (TMW 209) which I am looking at as I type, is the closest in appearance, for now. I have the good fortune to be home because the flooring for the new train room is going in today.

Ron Merrick

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Tim O'Connor wrote:
Tony, none of the photos I've seen of the F-70-6 shows ASF A-3
trucks, including the photos in Volume 3. The F-70-7's (identical, I
believe) all had Barber S-2-A-0 trucks, according to the SP 1956
company roster.
The F-70-6 trucks do show spring planks, so the trucks were
different than the -7 class. I don't think there is a HO truck that
matches them exactly.
You're right, Tim. I went back to the SP order summaries. The
F-70-6 trucks ARE from ASF but are not the A-3 model, and they DO have
spring planks. The F-70-7 cars were built from the same blueprints and
certainly are visually identical, but do have different trucks.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Bulkhead F-70-6 flat

mopacfirst
 

Indeed, I was trying to acknowledge that by using the term 'Intermountain-made'. It was late at night my time, and I could have phrased it better. Same issue with the ART reefer that I'm intimately familiar with.

Thanks for the advice on the truck ID -- I frankly couldn't tell from looking.

Ron Merrick

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Ron Merrick wrote:
I picked up one of the Intermountain-made SP F-70-6 bulkhead flats.
Very nice. A lot of my other cars are in storage, so I can't check
what I did before, but I looked at the prototype photos in the SP
book and can't tell exactly what the best choice of truck would be
(this prototype is older than most of the new 70-trucks that are now
available) so what looks best to me is the Tahoe 50-ton Barber
lateral motion truck. Anybody have a better idea?
Actually, Ron, they were shepherded through production by
InterMountain, but were produced from dies owned by the Southern
Pacific Historical & Technical Society, and are sold only by the
Society.
The Class F-70-6 cars were delivered with ASF A-3 70-ton
trucks. This truck is available from Tahoe Model Works.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Bulkhead F-70-6 flat

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
Tony, none of the photos I've seen of the F-70-6 shows ASF A-3 trucks, including the photos in Volume 3. The F-70-7's (identical, I believe) all had Barber S-2-A-0 trucks, according to the SP 1956 company roster.
The F-70-6 trucks do show spring planks, so the trucks were different than the -7 class. I don't think there is a HO truck that matches them exactly.
You're right, Tim. I went back to the SP order summaries. The F-70-6 trucks ARE from ASF but are not the A-3 model, and they DO have spring planks. The F-70-7 cars were built from the same blueprints and certainly are visually identical, but do have different trucks.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Union Starch Refining Type 30 Tank Cars

Bill Welch
 

Friends:

While on my journey with the Sunshine Type 30 kit assembly I made a
decision to not build it for Hercules but rather as a car leased to
Union Starch Refining. One of the reasons I collect photos is to use
them for inspiration and guidance when building a model and since I
have two photos of these cars in-service to Union, and access to a
third photo, the change of mind made sense to me. One of the reasons
I purchased the photo of USTX 754 was that it had interesting details
on top of the tank, namely what I would call a "cross-over dome
platform" sort of structure that would be easy to build from styrene
and on the dome itself was a "frangible disk" safety valve and a
circular safety railing that I thought would be a little challenging
to build and interesting to look at once done. I scratch built the
safety valve and I am very happy with its appearance. A new friend on
this list sent me some photo-etched "O" rings that are very petite
and I used these for the handrail stanchions. The molded on safety
valves were easy to remove. One of the things I love about building
resin kits is how easy it is to work with the material when one wants
to make such a change. I will try to post a photo or two eventually.

Anyway, recently a friend told me that Lloyd Keyser recently had an
article on doing the same change with one of the Drake models in the
St. Louis Terminal Railroad Historical & Technical Society magazine.
I went to their website and indeed there is a 140 page issue that
includes stories about these cars and I can order a copy the 2010
Summer issue for only $35 plus $4 postage. I decided I did not want
to know that much about the cars and the company. However on the
cover there is a very nice color photo of a car that helps determine
what details are red and which are black. All of the grabs and
handrails are black, as are the ladders and the dome platforms. The
tank straps are red The cover as displayed on the website is fairly
small however and I am not totally sure, but it appears that the very
top of the dome and all its fittings are black also.

I am wondering if anyone has this issue of their magazine or color
photos of these cars and can confirm if the treatment of the top of
the dome is as I described it?

Thank you.
Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727.470.9930
fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com


Re: Tarnished brass

dennyanspach <danspach@...>
 

Unless shiny brass is a requirement for display purposes. However, the usual tarnish should be of no concern if the model is to painted; that is, if the usual routine common sense preparations for painting brass are otherwise undertaken.

As but several ad hoc personal examples, I have a number of NPP models whose tarnished exteriors have been painted, painted well, and have stood up for decades looking great.

Denny

Denny S. Anspach MD
Sacramento

85341 - 85360 of 189574