Date   

new book announcement

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Signature Press is proud to announce the publication of Roger Hinman's book, Merchants Despatch, a history of the company and a complete description of its rolling stock, from the 19th century to the end of MDT in 2000. The cars included not only thousands of MDT cars for New York Central's needs, but many more for a variety of lessees, and in later years, large numbers of non-refrigerated cars. For more on this book, you may visit our website (URL below). We offer free shipping on direct individual orders from within the U.S., an option available on our website.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Was a 7-ft box car door really . . .

Dick Dawson <dickdawson@...>
 

Seven-foot door openings were not as common as six-foot or eight-foot, but
they did exist. Even though the bodies of sliding doors are wider than the
opening by several inches, published door sizes always refer to the width
and height of the clear opening and not to the size of the door itself.



Dick Dawson



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Brian
Sent: Wednesday, November 09, 2011 12:58 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Was a 7-ft box car door really . . .





seven feet (for example) wide? Or, was it typical for box car doors to be a
bit wider because the actual box car door opening was seven feet (for
example) wide, and doors needed to span the opening plus some? If so, was
this a common building practice?

Thanks much,

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa


Re: Was a 7-ft box car door really . . .

Benjamin Hom
 

Brian Chapman asked:
"Was a 7-ft box car door really seven feet (for example) wide?"

No.

"Or, was it typical for box car doors to be a bit wider because the actual box
car door opening was seven feet (for example) wide, and doors needed to span the
opening plus some?"

Yes.

"If so, was this a common building practice?"

Yes.


Ben Hom


Was a 7-ft box car door really . . .

Brian <cornbeltroute@...>
 

seven feet (for example) wide? Or, was it typical for box car doors to be a bit wider because the actual box car door opening was seven feet (for example) wide, and doors needed to span the opening plus some? If so, was this a common building practice?

Thanks much,

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa


Slack adjuster [Was: Brake system on D&RGW . . .]

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

As it happens, there are excellent detail photos of a slack adjuster on the new ExactRail B&O wagontop car underframes. Try this link for example, to the ExactRail website:

EPS-90051

or

http://www.exactrail.com/b-o-m-53-wagontop-box-car-b-o?utm_source=exactrail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=11082011

The longer one may divide in transmission, so be sure to paste in ALL of it to your browser.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: trucks

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

cj riley wrote:
Not entirely true, even if still disappointing. A lot of changes were made to track and wheel standards to provide dimensions with +- tolerances to enable better manufacturers' compliance. The coupler committee evolved into a large scale standards group and completed a great deal of work for those scales. Unfortunately, I had to give up management of the committe, no one else stepped up and the half completed work sits.
But my main point remains. A great deal was promised and little delivered.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: trucks

cj riley <cjriley42@...>
 

Not entirely true, even if still disappointing. A lot of changes were made to track and wheel standards to provide dimensions with +- tolerances to enable better manufacturers' compliance. The coupler committee evolved into a large scale standards group and completed a great deal of work for those scales. Unfortunately, I had to give up management of the committe, no one else stepped up and the half completed work sits.

 
CJ Riley
Bainbridge Island WA


________________________________
From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, November 8, 2011 11:19 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: trucks


 
Dennis Storzek wrote:
Actually, no. The truck width problem traces back directly to the
NMRA Recommended Practices adopted in the 1960s, and only slightly
updated about twenty years later . . .
Several years ago there was a move afoot to do a current revision to
the NMRA Standards and RP's; I had some small input to the revision
of the wheel and track standards. Coupler boxes, trucks, and all
sorts of stuff were also supposed to be looked at, but I haven't had
any contact with the coupler group in several years now, and it
looks like the effort has quietly died.
For years the NMRA Standards chair talked a great game and did
practically nothing. Numerous people who attempted to help soon found
that the entire operation was a Potemkin village. And as Dennis says,
it has now all faded away. Not one of the NMRA's brighter moments.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [H0] Brake system on D&RGW 40' auto box car

Dick Dawson <dickdawson@...>
 

Roland,



I’ve worked as an engineer in the freight car industry for over 40 years, so
let me look at your photos from that vantage point. I agree that the center
rod (the rod connecting the cylinder lever and the fulcrum lever) is at an
odd angle. The fact that the fulcrum lever (the white lever behind the
brake cylinder) has an unused hole at one end also does not make sense. I
think your suggestion that the two levers have been switched is probably
correct. If we switch the positions of the two levers and flip the black
lever, which now becomes the fulcrum lever, so that connection to the center
rod is closer to the center sill than it is now, the angularity of the
center rod will improve. While I am not familiar with this particular type
of slack adjuster, its location would be consistent with an early automatic
slack adjuster in that it is located at the same place as the series of
holes at the fulcrum lever pivot point which provided the means for manual
adjustment. The number of holes in the lever would now be correct; one for
the slack adjuster (top of the photo), one for the center rod, and one for
the top rod going to the A end truck. The white lever, now the cylinder
lever, would have four holes used for (again top-to-bottom) the hand brake
connection, the brake cylinder push rod, the center rod, and the top rod
going to the B end truck.



While the angularity of the center rod as hooked up in the photo is
excessive, center rods are not always perfectly parallel to the center line
of car in real life. Since the cylinder lever has no fixed fulcrum, the
lateral forces on it must be balanced so that it will not be pulled to one
side of the car or the other when the brakes are applied. Engineers laying
out brake rigging are careful to position the rods and levers such that the
lateral components of the forces in the brake rods connected to the cylinder
lever are essentially balanced left-to-right.



And now for some serious nitpicking. I realize that there are significant
differences in working at 3.5 mm to the foot versus 12 in. to the foot, but
I note that several important parts of the brake system are missing. First,
there is no air brake train line running between the angle cocks and
therefore no branch pipe running from the train line to the AB control
valve. Second, there is no retainer pipe running from the control valve to
the retaining valve, which at this time period would be on one of the ends
of the car. And finally, hand brake rods are typically not connected
directly to the cylinder lever, but rather are connected by means of a short
chain. Thus, when the air brakes are applied, the hand brake rod is not
pushed forward and back. Only the modeler can determine how much minute
detail he wants to include, especially for parts underneath the car where
few people will ever see it.



Dick Dawson



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Roland Levin
Sent: Tuesday, November 08, 2011 3:41 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] [H0] Brake systemon D&RGW 40' autoboxc ar





Thanks Gary for directing me to the handout. It's a great help for anyone
interested in modeling the underbody details. Thanks also to Richard and Tim
for the information you provided. I'm still not sure if the photos of the
brake system in the modeling notes for the kits are prototypical correct.

I took two photos of the illustrations in the modeling notes and posted them
to Photos section in the folder "Brake system Sunshine D&RGW boxcars". They
are awaiting approval. I intend to remove them as soon as this this topic is
finalized to avoid any discussions about copy right. I would appreciate if
anyone could look at them and give your comments. I suspect that the two
levers could have been mixed up and I think the angel of the center rod
looks strange. I would also appreciate if anyone could confirm that this
location of the slack adjuster is correct or at least plausible.

Best regards

Roland Levin
Stockholm, Sweden
http://hem.bredband.net/drgw
http://www.usms.se

Ämne: RE: [STMFC] [H0] Brake systemon D&RGW 40' autoboxcar

You can find an excellent handout in the file section for the group, its
called: Freight Car Underbody Detail by Gene Green. An illustration of a
slack adjustor is on page 14. It was added to the files by Doug Harding on
April 3, 2009.

Its one of my most used files! I keep it in a folder near my workshop desk.

gary laakso





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: ExactRail M-53 Wagontop Boxcar Announcement!

talltim10
 

Apologies, I've found the date when I looked at the details for an individual model variant. (1937)

Tim David

--- In STMFC@..., "talltim10" <talltim@...> wrote:

It looks like a very nice model, but I find it strange that you don't mention when they were first introduced to service in your mail or on the website? However I've noticed that this seems to be quite common.

Tim David

--- In STMFC@..., "Blaine" <blainehadfield@> wrote:

Group,

ExactRail has announced the all-new Baltimore and Ohio M-53 Wagontop boxcar! This model is available for advanced purchase on November 15th with delivery in early December.


the subject of trucks

Randy Arnold <arnoldrandy5115@...>
 

On this subject I wonder if anyone could point me in the right direction for trucks to equip the C Boas WP and SAL flat cars?


Re: ExactRail M-53 Wagontop Boxcar Announcement!

talltim10
 

It looks like a very nice model, but I find it strange that you don't mention when they were first introduced to service in your mail or on the website? However I've noticed that this seems to be quite common.

Tim David

--- In STMFC@..., "Blaine" <blainehadfield@...> wrote:

Group,

ExactRail has announced the all-new Baltimore and Ohio M-53 Wagontop boxcar! This model is available for advanced purchase on November 15th with delivery in early December.


Re: Cotton Belt Auto car question

Dennis Williams
 

Aaron.
  Just by practace of other railroads and not having an available photo, directly over the lower rivit line ( approx 1/3 up from bottom) on the sealed door, left door, looking from the side.
Dennis Williams/Owner
www.resinbuilders4u.com


________________________________
From: Aaron Gjermundson <npin53@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, November 8, 2011 11:00 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Cotton Belt Auto car question



 

While at the Lisle RPM last month, I picked up one of the new Sunshine kits of a Cotton Belt auto car. In the instructions, it says, during WWII, the left doors were sealed and stenciled with "THIS DOOR IS STATIONARY". There is no picture or reference as to where on the left door this was put.

Would anyone have any idea as to the placement of this information?

In my 1953 RER, it shows all cars as being single door in series 38500-38999.

Thank you for any assistance.

Aaron




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Cotton Belt Auto car question

npin53
 

While at the Lisle RPM last month, I picked up one of the new Sunshine kits of a Cotton Belt auto car. In the instructions, it says, during WWII, the left doors were sealed and stenciled with "THIS DOOR IS STATIONARY". There is no picture or reference as to where on the left door this was put.

Would anyone have any idea as to the placement of this information?

In my 1953 RER, it shows all cars as being single door in series 38500-38999.

Thank you for any assistance.

Aaron


Re: B&M reweigh symbol

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Ignoring the straight line, I’ll answer: New Hampshire.



Schuyler




What State? I'll add it to the list.

Jim Brewer

Glenwood MD

----- Original Message -----

From: "Anthony Thompson" <thompson@... <mailto:thompson%40signaturepress.com> >
To: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, November 8, 2011 9:01:28 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: B&M reweigh symbol



Don Burn wrote:
From the B&M list.

I believe it stands for Dover Shops.
Thanks to Don Burn and Jack Kelley for the help.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@... <mailto:thompson%40signaturepress.com>
Publishers of books on railroad history










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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: B&M reweigh symbol

James F. Brewer <jfbrewer@...>
 

What State?  I'll add it to the list.



Jim Brewer

Glenwood MD

----- Original Message -----


From: "Anthony Thompson" <thompson@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, November 8, 2011 9:01:28 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: B&M reweigh symbol

 




Don Burn wrote:
From the B&M list.

I believe it stands for Dover Shops.
Thanks to Don Burn and Jack Kelley for the help.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO CERRO-BEND?

buygonet <buygone@...>
 

Bill:

Try Fred at The Original Whistle Stop. I spook with him today and he has some in stock. He orderes it on a regular basis as thats where I purchase all that I use.

Paul C. Koehler

--- In STMFC@..., WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...> wrote:


Does anyone know the status of Cerro-Bend and a current source of supply? This material was heavily used back in
the 70's to add weight to model ocomotives and rolling stock. It has a very low melting point.All hobby shops carried it.
I had totally forgotten about this material but was reminded about it during a conversation at Lisle. I was talking about
milling out the backside of flat car center sills (Such as on the Chad Boas flat car) in order to add weight. The suggestion
was to pour Cerro-Bend into the groove. It sounded great, however, now I cannot find the product.

Again thanks in advance.

Bill Pardie


Re: B&M reweigh symbol

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Don Burn wrote:
From the B&M list.

I believe it stands for Dover Shops.
Thanks to Don Burn and Jack Kelley for the help.


Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


FW: [BM_RR] Re: FW: B&M reweigh symbol

Don Burn
 

From the B&M list.

Don Burn

-----Original Message-----
From: BM_RR@... [mailto:BM_RR@...] On Behalf Of Jack
Kelley
Sent: Tuesday, November 08, 2011 6:22 PM
To: BM_RR@...
Subject: [BM_RR] Re: FW: [STMFC] B&M reweigh symbol



I believe it stands for Dover Shops.

Jack Kelley

--- In BM_RR@... <mailto:BM_RR%40yahoogroups.com> , "Don Burn"
<burn@...> wrote:

Can someone here answer this?

Don Burn


-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ] On
Behalf Of Anthony Thompson
Sent: Tuesday, November 08, 2011 1:59 PM
To: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] B&M reweigh symbol

Can anyone say what the DS reweigh symbol stood for on the B&M?
It's not in the file on line.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: trucks (was Bulkhead F-70-6 flat)

soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Dennis how do Kato ASF A-3 trucks compare in width to the prototype?
They use a .950 axle. I think there is another brand (Atlas?) that also
uses a shorter axle (1.000 or less) but I can't recall which one. The
Broadway Limited N&W hopper car trucks use .975 axles.

Reboxx makes axles as long as 1.075!!

Tim O'Connor
Those are for the "Pennsylvania trolley gauge" broad gauge streetcars. :)

I don't have a set of Kato trucks handy to measure, but I did upload some useful information to the Files area several years ago. See:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/files/Finescale_Truck_Width.htm

Brian Leppard has pointed out that my thesis ignores the solid bearing trucks made in the fifties that used spring groups similar to the 1964 AAR standards, and he is correct, but I've never run into a good summary of exactly what was being done, so haven't revised my data. If someone has the info, I'd certainly like to do a re-write. Until that happens, I'm confident that trucks with four or five position spring groups are well covered, and trucks that use seven or nine position groups can be extrapolated from the 1964 standards, since they are likely predecessors to those standards.

Another detail not mentioned is that if you use the ReBoxx or IM "Code 88" wheels that actually have the same flange dimensions as the NMRA Code 110 RP-25 wheels, and those wheels are set to the typical back to back dimension, the faces of the wheel plates are just about where they belong on the prototype; all the extra width of the wheels is inside the gauge. Of course, we are still missing the back of the journal boxes, but we can't have everything, now, can we?

Dennis


ExactRail M-53 Wagontop Boxcar Announcement!

Blaine
 

Group,

ExactRail has announced the all-new Baltimore and Ohio M-53 Wagontop boxcar! This model is available for advanced purchase on November 15th with delivery in early December.

ExactRail's M-53 Wagontop is available in six paint schemes with as many as twelve road numbers. Please visit ExactRail.com for all of the details and to view the gallery of product photos.

ExactRail's M-53 Wagontop Boxcar was designed, engineered and tooled in the U.S.! Additionally, ExactRail's M-53 Wagontop boxcar is offered with accurate paint colors and lettering schemes. In the development of this project, we enlisted the insight of some of the nation's foremost experts and historians on B&O equipment. Their input represents years of meticulous research, the results are yours to enjoy!

Best regards,

Blaine Hadfield

Vice President, Product
ExactRail, LLC

91241 - 91260 of 195525