Date   

Re: D&RGW Boxcar Color

Lee Thwaits <leethwaits@...>
 

Star brand paints (from PBL) has D&RGW boxcar red.
Lee Thwaits


Re: Fox Valley (and ExactRail) B&O Wagontop

Bruce Smith
 

John,

You've got the dates right in your email ;^) I suppose this means that
you're asking that timeless question... how quickly did prototype steam
era freight car paint schemes get changed? Actually, the answer is
pretty easy... "It depends" There ya go! Problem solved <G>.

OK, seriously. Prototype cars were repainted approximately every 5-10
years depending on the economics and perspective of the home road and of
course, relying on the car to make it home at some point. For your 1957
era, if you have just a single one of these, I'd go for the mid
1955-1957 "Billboard 13 Great States" scheme from Chris' B&O boxcar
lettering PDF. Obviously, the reweigh date should be between mid 1955
and your modeling date. As noted previously, that scheme is not listed
for the FVM or the Exactrail car. Alternatively, you could go with the
Mid 1946 - Mid 1955 "Post War 13 Great States" and weather the car a bit
more. That would be exactrail SKU 90051

Note that the blue and green schemes listed are both express boxcar
schemes for use in passenger service.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

"John Degnan" <Scaler164@...> 11/14/11 7:16 PM >>>
Glad Ken posted this question as I have been meaning to ask this same
thing. I model the year 1957, so I'd like to know which of the schemes
being offered by Fox Valley could have still been seen on the prototypes
up to that year? :

http://www.foxvalleymodels.com/pdfs/jpgs/feb11bobox.jpg

ExactRail is about to release their own model of this car, and they are
offering it in 6 different B&O schemes. So my question applies to the
ExactRail model as well (although their site does show some mediocre
info about the timeline of the schemes they offer) :


http://www.exactrail.com/model-trains?dir=asc&order=name&product_type=2082
Main Product Page

http://www.exactrail.com/b-o-m-53-wagontop-box-car-b-o-2233
Listed as a 1937 and later scheme
(offered in 12 road numbers)

http://www.exactrail.com/b-o-m-53-wagontop-box-car-b-o-2236
Listed as a 1947 and later scheme
(offered in 5 road numbers)

http://www.exactrail.com/b-o-m-53-wagontop-box-car-b-o
Listed as a mid 1945 and later scheme
(offered in 12 road numbers)

http://www.exactrail.com/b-o-m-53-wagontop-box-car-b-o-2234
Listed as a late 1937 and later scheme
(offered in 6 road numbers)

http://www.exactrail.com/b-o-m-53-wagontop-box-car-b-o-2235
Listed as a 1942 - 1959 scheme
(offered in 6 road numbers)


John Degnan
Scaler164@...

--- In STMFC@..., "kenrobbins39" <kenrobbins39@...> wrote:
>
> I recently picked up an HO scale B&O wagontop boxcar imported by Fox
Valley, that has the large B&O lettering. It's a beautiful model and I
really prefer it over the older, smaller lettering, but because I model
the year 1954, I have a concern about the "NEW 6-63" date on the side.
>
> Can anyone on this list tell me when these M-53's were first
repainted with the large B&O lettering?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Ken Robbins





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re; Pig Iron

Aidrian Bridgeman-Sutton <smokeandsteam@...>
 

Several possibilities exist, but none are easy styrene solution for
the time frame you have in mind; I assume you’re in HO so here are
some possibilities based on my own interests in the area around
Birmingham AL

Gondolas were typically used for pig ron loading with the pigs tending
to be loaded over the bolsters; low sided gons were especially useful.

SOU low sided steeel gons are the obvious choice. For the 30s only the
Speed witch resin kit is appropriate – the Smoky Mountain kit
represents cars as they were rebuilt in the post war period.

I have a photo of a SAL composite gon with pig iron and Sunshine do a
resin kit of such a beast. I’m not sure that composite construction
would have lasted long in this service, but it certainly happened

CofG used cut down USRA cars as noted inana earlier response – the
problem is that while I have copies of diagrams for these I have never
seen a photo

ACL didn’t serve Birmingham in its own right until after WW2 but they
also had a class of low side steel gons that can be kit bashed from
the old ERTL gon

Aidrian
--
Beer has no effect on concrete, but unless the concrete is specially
treated the taste of the beer could be affected. (Military Engineering
Vol XIV, Concrete, WO Code No 8626, 1952.)


Re: Was a 7-ft box car door really . . .

Scott Pitzer
 

Those too-narrow 6' doors were typically too short also, because of the fat door tracks. So they were somewhat in-proportion to the eye.
But it made it difficult for those Weston figures to unload the cars.
Scott Pitzer
________________________________

From: jim_mischke <jmischke@...>

What we call a seven foot door is actually the prototype door opening width.

Previous to that, it was common for modelmakers to make the door itself the
nominal six, seven, eight foot wide. And we customers did not know the
difference. Few if any of us checked drawings.

--

.


Re: Placards

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

After my earlier post about route cards, I received a question about cars for which the route card board location isn't obvious. I had been working on a post about such things, so I just modified it to respond directly to the question. I included both prototype and model photos of locations, with route cards applied. That post can be viewed by this link:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2011/11/route-cards-3.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Fox Valley (and ExactRail) B&O Wagontop

John Degnan <Scaler164@...>
 

Glad Ken posted this question as I have been meaning to ask this same thing. I model the year 1957, so I'd like to know which of the schemes being offered by Fox Valley could have still been seen on the prototypes up to that year? :

http://www.foxvalleymodels.com/pdfs/jpgs/feb11bobox.jpg

ExactRail is about to release their own model of this car, and they are offering it in 6 different B&O schemes. So my question applies to the ExactRail model as well (although their site does show some mediocre info about the timeline of the schemes they offer) :

http://www.exactrail.com/model-trains?dir=asc&order=name&product_type=2082
Main Product Page

http://www.exactrail.com/b-o-m-53-wagontop-box-car-b-o-2233
Listed as a 1937 and later scheme
(offered in 12 road numbers)

http://www.exactrail.com/b-o-m-53-wagontop-box-car-b-o-2236
Listed as a 1947 and later scheme
(offered in 5 road numbers)

http://www.exactrail.com/b-o-m-53-wagontop-box-car-b-o
Listed as a mid 1945 and later scheme
(offered in 12 road numbers)

http://www.exactrail.com/b-o-m-53-wagontop-box-car-b-o-2234
Listed as a late 1937 and later scheme
(offered in 6 road numbers)

http://www.exactrail.com/b-o-m-53-wagontop-box-car-b-o-2235
Listed as a 1942 - 1959 scheme
(offered in 6 road numbers)


John Degnan
Scaler164@...

--- In STMFC@..., "kenrobbins39" <kenrobbins39@...> wrote:
>
> I recently picked up an HO scale B&O wagontop boxcar imported by Fox Valley, that has the large B&O lettering. It's a beautiful model and I really prefer it over the older, smaller lettering, but because I model the year 1954, I have a concern about the "NEW 6-63" date on the side.
>
> Can anyone on this list tell me when these M-53's were first repainted with the large B&O lettering?
>
> Thanks.
>
> Ken Robbins


Re: Was a 7-ft box car door really . . .

Andy Carlson
 

Yes, and at least one manufacturer, Front Range Products, made that same
mistake.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


________________________________
From: jim_mischke <jmischke@...>




What we call a seven foot door is actually the prototype door opening width.

Previous to that, it was common for modelmakers to make the door itself the
nominal six, seven, eight foot wide. And we customers did not know the
difference. Few if any of us checked drawings.

--


Re: Was a 7-ft box car door really . . .

Jim Mischke
 

What we call a seven foot door is actually the prototype door opening width.

If I recall correctly, this was first pointed out by C&NW boxcar expert Jeff Koeller at a Naperville presentation a few years ago. Previous to that, it was common for modelmakers to make the door itself the nominal six, seven, eight foot wide. And we customers did not know the difference. Few if any of us checked drawings.

--- In STMFC@..., "Brian" <cornbeltroute@...> wrote:

seven feet (for example) wide? Or, was it typical for box car doors to be a bit wider because the actual box car door opening was seven feet (for example) wide, and doors needed to span the opening plus some? If so, was this a common building practice?

Thanks much,

Brian Chapman
Evansdale, Iowa


Re: Fox Valley B&O wagontop

Jim Mischke
 

Ken, The B&O billboard lettering on B&O boxcars started in 1955, the one you have is a 1962 variation.

The only billboard lettering appropriate to your 1954 era is on hopper cars, with a large ampersand in the large "B&O"

Dr. Chris Barkan made up B&O hopper and boxcar scorecards of B&O lettering schemes and some names. This made sense and wisdom out of what had been total chaos before. There are enough exceptions and variations to warrent more discussion, this will get you started.


B&O Boxcars:

http://borhs.org/Logos/CBarkan/BOBoxcarStenciling1920-60s.pdf



B&O Hoppers:

http://borhs.org/Logos/CBarkan/BOHopperStenciling1940-60s.pdf

--- In STMFC@..., "kenrobbins39" <kenrobbins39@...> wrote:

I recently picked up an HO scale B&O wagontop boxcar imported by Fox Valley, that has the large B&O lettering. It's a beautiful model and I really prefer it over the older, smaller lettering, but because I model the year 1954, I have a concern about the "NEW 6-63" date on the side.

Can anyone on this list tell me when these M-53's were first repainted with the large B&O lettering?

Thanks.

Ken Robbins
Hancock, NH


Re: Time Period Covered by STMFC Group

Dick Dawson <dickdawson@...>
 

My thanks to everyone who pointed me in the direction of the BBFCL and MFCL. I joined the MFCL and it looks very interesting.



Dick Dawson



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Jim Gates
Sent: Sunday, October 30, 2011 6:57 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Time Period Covered by STMFC Group





bbfcl - 1954-1986
mfcl is 1960 and later

Jim Gates

________________________________
From: Schuyler Larrabee <schuyler.larrabee@... <mailto:schuyler.larrabee%40verizon.net> >
To: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, October 30, 2011 9:04 AM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Time Period Covered by STMFC Group



There are two other lists:

The Baby Boomer FCL, which I believe covers around 1945 to maybe 1976? I'm
not a member so don't know for sure.

The Modern Freight Cars list, which I believe covers post-1960.

Both are Yahoo! lists and can be found on Yahoo!

SGL

From: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Dick
Dawson
Sent: Sunday, October 30, 2011 10:47 AM
To: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Time Period Covered by STMFC Group

I'm relatively new to this group and find the level of expertise of the
participants to be remarkable. This was certainly exhibited in the photos
from the Lisle RPM Meet. I noticed photos of Penn Central and TTX cars,
which certainly caught my attention, as I designed cars built by both those
companies. Having worked in the freight car industry since the late 1960s,
my interests are more oriented to the period from about 1960 to the present.
This is true, not only because of my personal involvement for most of that
period, but also because of significant changes in freight car use and
construction that took place during that time, including the following:

the widespread use of 100-ton, and later 110-ton, cars

the replacement of solid journal bearings with roller bearings

the replacement of boxcars by covered hopper cars as the primary carriers of
grain, with covered hoppers eventually becoming the most widely used car
type

the introduction of 60-ft. and 86-ft. boxcars, first for auto parts and
eventually (although not 86-ft. cars) for a wide variety of loads

the enormous expansion of intermodal traffic and the proliferation of car
types used to haul it

The STMFC group's limitation to freight cars built prior to 1960 is entirely
logical, as indicated in the name, but the foregoing leads me to the
question of whether there is a similar discussion group that covers the
period after 1960. Any suggestions from the participants in this group
would be greatly appreciated.

Dick Dawson

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "dh30973"
<dhussey@...> wrote:

The photos I took at the Lisle RPM Meet are up at:

http://www.pbase.com/dh30973/lisle2011
<http://www.pbase.com/dh30973/lisle2011
<http://www.pbase.com/dh30973/lisle2011 <http://www.pbase.com/dh30973/lisle2011&page=all> &page=all> &page=all> &page=all

Dave Hussey


=======
Email scanned by PC Tools - No viruses or spyware found.
(Email Guard: 7.0.0.21, Virus/Spyware Database: 6.18610)
http://www.pctools.com <http://www.pctools.com/?cclick=EmailFooterClean_51>
=======

=======
Email scanned by PC Tools - No viruses or spyware found.
(Email Guard: 7.0.0.21, Virus/Spyware Database: 6.18610)
http://www.pctools.com/
=======

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: D&RGW Boxcar Color

John Cook <jtcrgs455@...>
 

D&RGW automobile car #60271 is actually a double door car.  It has a unique 9'-0" auxiliary door and 6'-0" main door on each side.
 
John Cook


Basket cars

Charles Hladik
 

Jim Brewer,
My reply got kicked, so...........................
The Virginia Tech web site has photos of 2 basket cars. The first is
numbered 203164, an F-24. The second is numbered 203422, an F-20. One
appears to have a routing placard that I can't read.
Doubt that they would wind up on the Rutland ca. 48.
Thanks,
Chuck Hladik


Re: Pig Iron

Todd Horton
 

The  C of G used USRA clone gons with the sides lowered to transport this material out of Birmingham Ala.  Todd Horton



________________________________
From: traininsp <Bbear746@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, November 14, 2011 2:27 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Pig Iron



 

Does anyone here know what types of cars were used to ship pig iron during the 1930's

Thanks in advance
Jeff Coleman




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Calling Lonnie Donegan? (was: Pig Iron)

Scott Pitzer
 

Just when I thought the Topic of the Day was going to livestock....
somebody brings up pig iron... like when the engineer in the song "Rock Island Line" fools the man at the big toll gate just outside of New-Ah-Leens.
Or, in the Stan Freberg version, he "foo" him...
Scott Pitzer


Re: Pig Iron

water.kresse@...
 

So did the Hocking Valley then C&O in SE Ohio.  It would be interesting to see how small the "pigs" were by that time.



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----


From: "O Fenton Wells" <srrfan1401@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, November 14, 2011 2:29:54 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Pig Iron

I believe the Southern RR used gondolas for this purpose.
Fenton Wells

On Mon, Nov 14, 2011 at 2:27 PM, traininsp <Bbear746@...> wrote:

**


Does anyone here know what types of cars were used to ship pig iron during
the 1930's

Thanks in advance
Jeff Coleman

 


--
Fenton Wells
3047 Creek Run
Sanford NC 27332
919-499-5545
srrfan1401@...


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Stock Car Question

Douglas Harding
 

Steve, Tony, and others: the chart I tried to send did not come through
Yahoo very well. I have a copy of AAR Pamphlet NO 19 "Methods for Loading
and Handling Live Stock" issued April 1925, revised January 1942. On page 8
is the same chart as used by the UP and the ATSF. A jpg of page 8 is
awaiting approval to be uploaded into a new photo album "stock cars" found
in the group photos.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: Stock Car Question

Rob & Bev Manley
 

I used the Dyna-Models lead cows as weight in my Central Valley NP Stockars. I never did actually weigh and add up the total however but I am quite sure they NEVER exceeded NMRA standards.
Rob Manley
Midwest Mod-U-Trak
"Better modeling through personal embarrassment"

----- Original Message -----
From: John H
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, November 14, 2011 2:51 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Stock Car Question



Well, it shouldn't be too difficult to figure out how much the livestock weighs. Let's see now .... hmmm. a three lb package of hamburger weighs three lbs so a one lb canned ham would weigh ...

Oh never mind.

John Hagen

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:
>
> Doug Harding wrote:
> > Steve, that in general is correct. Railroads and Livestock Shipping
> > Associations have published such data for many years. Here is a chart
> > showing how many animals of a given size will fit in a stockcar.
>
> Thanks, Doug. Very helpful. But heck. Now I have to decide how
> HEAVY my livestock is. Ah, the ever-elusive prototype reality! Such a
> challenge!
>
> Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
> 2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
> (510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
> Publishers of books on railroad history
>


Re: Stock Car Question

Douglas Harding
 

Tony glad I could help. Now to further your wealth of knowledge and enable
you to fill those stockpens and stockcars.



Weight of animals: we will talk about market ready, ie ready for slaughter,
as well as feeder, those ready to move to the feedlot from the grasslands.



Cattle: steers run about 1100-1250lbs, 100lbs less for heifers, bulls a
little more. figure 1400-1800 for the newer exotic breeds. Feeder calves
will be 400-600lbs.



Hogs: today's market looks for long and lean hog, 225-250 lbs. Which is
quite different from the period I model, 1949, when the market looked for a
fat hog at 300+ lbs. Hogs are one time were raised to 500+lbs, but that has
changed as .consumer demands have changed.



Sheep: figure about 135lbs for market ready. Feeder lambs will be about
30lbs.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: Stock Car Question

John H <sprinthag@...>
 

Well, it shouldn't be too difficult to figure out how much the livestock weighs. Let's see now .... hmmm. a three lb package of hamburger weighs three lbs so a one lb canned ham would weigh ...

Oh never mind.

John Hagen

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Doug Harding wrote:
Steve, that in general is correct. Railroads and Livestock Shipping
Associations have published such data for many years. Here is a chart
showing how many animals of a given size will fit in a stockcar.
Thanks, Doug. Very helpful. But heck. Now I have to decide how
HEAVY my livestock is. Ah, the ever-elusive prototype reality! Such a
challenge!

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Stock Car Question

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Doug Harding wrote:
Steve, that in general is correct. Railroads and Livestock Shipping Associations have published such data for many years. Here is a chart
showing how many animals of a given size will fit in a stockcar.
Thanks, Doug. Very helpful. But heck. Now I have to decide how HEAVY my livestock is. Ah, the ever-elusive prototype reality! Such a challenge!

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

91241 - 91260 of 195618