Date   

Re: Reweigh rules

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
When reweighing a LOT of freight cars for the 1956-1960 era, I'm shocked by how LITTLE decal material is available for the post-1950 era . . .
That's probably what we ALL say about our own era. <g> Simple fix: Jerry Glow will make decals. My SP tank car set has a LOT of late '40s and early '50s reweigh dates and locations, mostly SP with some SSW, UP and PFE locations. Any SP modeler of that time period will get all they need in Jerry's set. But more to the point, anyone can do the same for their own needs.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Reweigh rules

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Dec 1, 2011, at 8:59 AM, Jim wrote:
*****
If a car was off-a-wandering when it was time to reweigh ... was
it done by the other road or did it wait until it came back to its
home rails?
I assume the cars were weighed empty and not loaded - so were
cars routed to a reweigh location (for that purpose) or did they
just wait until they were empty at one of those locations?
It would seem that individual cars -might- have 'missed' their
reweigh dates by several months or even a year or more. Correct?
No. When the weight data on a car "timed out," it not supposed to be
accepted in interchange - and therefore, in effect, couldn't be
loaded - until it was reweighed. This was often carried out offline
by another railroad, not by the owner (though most car owners seem to
have been relatively conscientious about reweighing cars whose dates
were close to expiring whenever they came back onto home rails).
When empty, cars with expired reweigh dates were routed to the
nearest track scales to be reweighed and restenciled. No doubt there
were times when this practice was overlooked, but not often and not
for long. A sure way to get shippers upset was to have the car
containing their shipment refused in interchange because its light
weight was out of date.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Reweigh rules

mike brock <brockm@...>
 

In the early 50's passengers on UP trains passing over Sherman Hill complained about the blowing sand on the windows, etc. To solve this problem, UP apparently dumped used oil on the tracks to dampen the sand issue. Video programs show a rather black roadbed/ballast appearance during this time. Having spent some time in southeastern WY I can vouch for the blowing sand [ as can my video camera ]. It is interesting to note, however, that prior to that time, the area to the left of the box car door seems to receive more weathering than in some other areas. I note that this is particularly true on older models...those that I decaled prior to understanding the reweigh rules.

Mike Brock...heading for my shelter


Re: Reweigh rules

Bruce Smith
 

On Dec 1, 2011, at 10:59 AM, Jim wrote:
So ... why not put the drop of water right on the car and put
the dry decal in that to float off and slide into position -
thus eliminating the transfer using tweezers entirely?
This is precisely what I do - using a microbrush to add the water and knife tip to move the decal.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Re: Reweigh rules

Jim Betz
 

Jerry,

It would seem to me that a reweigh decal set that has a lot of
the individual numbers of 1 thru 12 (months) and then about 3 times
as many 40s and 7 times as many 50s (years) would sell ... I
know I'd but a few sets like this.
- Jim

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, jerryglow@... wrote:

Been there done that for custom orders. I do not do a "generic" set but if you send me a text file of the dates and locations along with font type and color and you can have them.

Jerry Glow


Re: Reweigh rules

Jim Betz
 

Tom,

Nice trick! I went positively -bonkers- several years ago when
I did up my own BN center beam cars - more than 160 individual
decals to apply to each car (IIRC I did 2 of them and still have
a couple more that are painted but not decalled in some project
box or other).
Which probably helps explain a lot of things about me you've all
been talking about for so long ...

****

So ... why not put the drop of water right on the car and put
the dry decal in that to float off and slide into position -
thus eliminating the transfer using tweezers entirely? In
thinking about it I think the next time I have some of these
small decals I will try putting the decal on the car with its
backing very near to its final location -and then adding a
drop of water over it and sliding "almost directly to where
it wants to be". Seems like it should work.

Is there a fly in this ointment?

****

Some other questions that have probably been answered before but my
center beam addled brain doesn't recall ...

If a car was off-a-wandering when it was time to reweigh ... was
it done by the other road or did it wait until it came back to its
home rails?
I assume the cars were weighed empty and not loaded - so were
cars routed to a reweigh location (for that purpose) or did they
just wait until they were empty at one of those locations?
It would seem that individual cars -might- have 'missed' their
reweigh dates by several months or even a year or more. Correct?

- Jim (C.B.A.B.)

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "pullmanboss" <tcmadden@...> wrote:

Bruce Smith wrote:

That's why I have very fine scissors and strong reading glasses at my modeling bench <VBG> I've lost count of the reweigh dates I've cut apart and pieced back together to get them in the correct time frame for June of 1944... Needless to say, I don't usually float single digits in a bucket of water when decaling either!
For very tiny decal bits I use a pin to place a small drop of water on the tip of my left index finger and put the decal on that. The decal will come loose in a few seconds but not float free. (That's why the "small drop".) Use fine tweezers to place the decal near where you want it on the model, then nudge the decal off the backing and into position. I use this technique for any decal smaller than my fingertip because it's much easier than chasing a floating decal across the surface of a water dish, or retreiving it from the bottom of the dish. (I use a shallow dark brown plastic cereal dish.)

Like many techniques, it takes longer to describe than do, and I suspect many of you have long since figured this one out too.

Tom Madden


Re: Reweigh rules

jerryglow2
 

Been there done that for custom orders. I do not do a "generic" set but if you send me a text file of the dates and locations along with font type and color and you can have them.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Brian Carlson <prrk41361@...> wrote:

Sounds like a easy sell to Jerry Glow. I too am piecing Champ together.
Brian Carlson

--- On Thu, 12/1/11, William Darnaby <wdarnaby@...> wrote:


From: William Darnaby <wdarnaby@...>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Reweigh rules
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, December 1, 2011, 10:16 AM



 



Yeah...that's also my beef with the Sunshine reweigh decals. Well done with
repack data and air brake data but you might get one date from the 50's for
each railroad. I guess the late 40's is Martin's period of interest. I
too, have just about used up my Champ stuff.

Bill Darnaby





Re: Reweigh rules

Tim O'Connor
 

Bruce

lol! yep, I do that too... except do you how RARE the digit
"5" is on some reweigh decals? Plus because I need "56" "57"
etc, it usually means TWO single digits in a bucket of water!
I just hope my eyesight holds out.

Tim O'

Bill, Folks,

That's why I have very fine scissors and strong reading glasses at my modeling bench <VBG> I've lost count of the reweigh dates I've cut apart and pieced back together to get them in the correct time frame for June of 1944... Needless to say, I don't usually float single digits in a bucket of water when decaling either!

Regards
Bruce


Re: Reweigh rules

Norm Buckhart
 

Tony - got both and printed them out. thanks, norm

On Nov 30, 2011, at 10:24 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

Norm Buckhart wrote:
that may be enough information. So as I understand it - for a car
say built Dec 1945, the first reweigh date would be in 36 months -
or Dec
1948, but then the second reweigh date might be Dec 51 or more
probably Dec 52. I think I can go from there.
Norm, it depends on car type, among other things. I made a table
of the rules for the late 1930s to 1960s, which was supposed to be in
the article I did on reweigh dates for Railroad Model Craftsman_ but
somewhere in the production process it got mutilated. A full version
is available on Google Docs at this link:

https://docs.google.com/viewer?a=v&pid=explorer&chrome=true&srcid=0Bz_ctrHrDz4wYzQ1YzZmZWEtNjU2ZS00Y2RjLTkyYTQtYjJkOWNiZDFlM2Y3&hl=en

and the table is on the second page; or you can find it via my blog
post on the subject, at:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2011/03/reweigh-article-from-
rmc.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Pennsy Trains from Potomac Yard: FNY-2 & AEC-5

Bill Welch
 

Friends:

I am trying to find photographs to illustrate certain trains that
were important in moving produce north from Potomac Yard. I will be
sending several of these messages as I identify the various trains
and have time to type them up. What I want are photos showing blocks
of reefers in the trains. My preference would be for photos made
before 1957. I hope you will forward this message on to your friends
that may be able to help if you cannot.

My source for these two trains is "Fast Freight Service Schedules for
Fruits & Vegetables: Season 1947-1948" on the Atlantic Coast Line.
The refrigerator cars originated on the ACL and were brought into Pot
Yard by the RF&P. If my search is productive, you may see the results
at Cocoa Beach in January. In fact photos of FNY-2 would help fill in
my story line quite nicely.

Please use my contact info below to respond off-line. Thank you so
much!

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727.470.9930
fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com

-----------------------------------------------------------

Here are the first two trains. Where there is more than one section I
have consolidated.

PRR FNY-2 departed Pot Yard 1:30 PM for the following points and
lines involved to those destinations

Newark; PRR
Jersey City; PRR
New York; PRR
Albany; PRR, WS

PRR AEC-5 departed Pot Yard 6:00 PM for the following points and
lines involved to those destinations

Albany; PRR, D&H
Boston; PRR, D&H, B&M
Buffalo; PRR
Montreal; PRR, D&H, CN, CP
Pittsburgh; PRR
Rochester; PRR, NYC
Scranton; PRR, D&H, DL&W
Syracuse; PRR, NYC, DL&W
Toronto; PRR, CN
Wilkes-Barre; PRR


Re: Reweigh rules

Joel Holmes <lehighvalley@...>
 

Hi Tom,

That is the way I have been applying decals for over 40 years now. I also
use a small screwdriver to lift the numbers off my finger and nudge them
in place. Often a car number has from 2 to 6 separate numbers. Pullman
names can have even more letters.

Joel Holmes

Bruce Smith wrote:

That's why I have very fine scissors and strong reading glasses at my
modeling bench <VBG> I've lost count of the reweigh dates I've cut
apart and pieced back together to get them in the correct time frame for
June of 1944... Needless to say, I don't usually float single digits in
a bucket of water when decaling either!
For very tiny decal bits I use a pin to place a small drop of water on the
tip of my left index finger and put the decal on that. The decal will come
loose in a few seconds but not float free. (That's why the "small drop".)
Use fine tweezers to place the decal near where you want it on the model,
then nudge the decal off the backing and into position. I use this
technique for any decal smaller than my fingertip because it's much easier
than chasing a floating decal across the surface of a water dish, or
retreiving it from the bottom of the dish. (I use a shallow dark brown
plastic cereal dish.)

Like many techniques, it takes longer to describe than do, and I suspect
many of you have long since figured this one out too.

Tom Madden


Re: Reweigh rules

pullmanboss <tcmadden@...>
 

Bruce Smith wrote:

That's why I have very fine scissors and strong reading glasses at my modeling bench <VBG> I've lost count of the reweigh dates I've cut apart and pieced back together to get them in the correct time frame for June of 1944... Needless to say, I don't usually float single digits in a bucket of water when decaling either!
For very tiny decal bits I use a pin to place a small drop of water on the tip of my left index finger and put the decal on that. The decal will come loose in a few seconds but not float free. (That's why the "small drop".) Use fine tweezers to place the decal near where you want it on the model, then nudge the decal off the backing and into position. I use this technique for any decal smaller than my fingertip because it's much easier than chasing a floating decal across the surface of a water dish, or retreiving it from the bottom of the dish. (I use a shallow dark brown plastic cereal dish.)

Like many techniques, it takes longer to describe than do, and I suspect many of you have long since figured this one out too.

Tom Madden


Re: Reweigh rules

pullmanboss <tcmadden@...>
 

Bruce Smith wrote:

That's why I have very fine scissors and strong reading glasses at my modeling bench <VBG> I've lost count of the reweigh dates I've cut apart and pieced back together to get them in the correct time frame for June of 1944... Needless to say, I don't usually float single digits in a bucket of water when decaling either!
For very tiny decal bits I use a pin to place a small drop of water on the tip of my left index finger and put the decal on that. The decal will come loose in a few seconds but not float free. (That's why the "small drop".) Use fine tweezers to place the decal near where you want it on the model, then nudge the decal off the backing and into position. I use this technique for any decal smaller than my fingertip because it's much easier than chasing a floating decal across the surface of a water dish, or retreiving it from the bottom of the dish. (I use a shallow dark brown plastic cereal dish.)

Like many techniques, it takes longer to describe than do, and I suspect many of you have long since figured this one out too.

Tom Madden


Re: Reweigh rules

Bruce Smith
 

On Dec 1, 2011, at 9:16 AM, William Darnaby wrote:

Yeah...that's also my beef with the Sunshine reweigh decals. Well done with
repack data and air brake data but you might get one date from the 50's for
each railroad. I guess the late 40's is Martin's period of interest. I
too, have just about used up my Champ stuff.

Bill Darnaby
Bill, Folks,

That's why I have very fine scissors and strong reading glasses at my modeling bench <VBG> I've lost count of the reweigh dates I've cut apart and pieced back together to get them in the correct time frame for June of 1944... Needless to say, I don't usually float single digits in a bucket of water when decaling either!

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Re: Reweigh rules

Brian Carlson
 

Sounds like a easy sell to Jerry Glow. I too am piecing Champ together.
Brian Carlson

--- On Thu, 12/1/11, William Darnaby <wdarnaby@att.net> wrote:


From: William Darnaby <wdarnaby@att.net>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Reweigh rules
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, December 1, 2011, 10:16 AM



 



Yeah...that's also my beef with the Sunshine reweigh decals. Well done with
repack data and air brake data but you might get one date from the 50's for
each railroad. I guess the late 40's is Martin's period of interest. I
too, have just about used up my Champ stuff.

Bill Darnaby



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Reweigh rules

william darnaby
 

Yeah...that's also my beef with the Sunshine reweigh decals. Well done with
repack data and air brake data but you might get one date from the 50's for
each railroad. I guess the late 40's is Martin's period of interest. I
too, have just about used up my Champ stuff.

Bill Darnaby





When reweighing a LOT of freight cars for the 1956-1960 era, I'm shocked by
how LITTLE decal material is available for the post-1950 era. For example
Ted Culotta's beautiful decal sets have like 13 or 14 1940's reweigh dates
and maybe 1 post-1953 date. Very frustrating. Thank goodness for Champ's
excellent data sets, but I'm using mine up quickly, and they're no longer
made.

Tim O'Connor





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: B&O Wagontop Comparison

gn999gn
 

Jim's posting said it best...

Before publicly comparing the products, wait till they are all here,
in the flesh. That is only fair and balanced.
Then put some drawing/pic/data documentation in front of you as a reference point.
Additionally, in the interest of balance, also add the Sunshine and Wrightrak (Jim King) M-53 into the comparison mix.
After all, isn't this supposed to be about the art of miniature replication and how well it was done ?

Ron dePierre

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "jim_mischke" <jmischke@...> wrote:



We might wait to compare. I don't believe the ExactRail wagontops are ashore yet.




--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "StephenK" <thekays100@> wrote:

Has anyone done a comparison of the Fox Valley and Exactrail models? As is usual, we now have two nice plastic models--last year we had none!

Steve Kay


Re: Reweigh rules

Tim O'Connor
 

Thanks Tony. I think I should return the favor, and point out that
SP 82940 was a B-50-21 that had Equipco hand brakes (not Ajax) and
a US Gypsum running board (not wood). I'll forgive the trucks since
no one makes an ASF truck w/ spring planks.

:-) :-)

yer helpful buddy

Tim


Re: Reweigh rules

Tim O'Connor
 

Bill

Yep, that's what I use as a rule when decaling -- 2.5 yrs for 1st reweigh,
6.5 yrs for 2nd, 10.5 for 3rd, etc. (The 1st is the more critical; others
can be skewed by years in either direction)

When reweighing a LOT of freight cars for the 1956-1960 era, I'm shocked by
how LITTLE decal material is available for the post-1950 era. For example
Ted Culotta's beautiful decal sets have like 13 or 14 1940's reweigh dates
and maybe 1 post-1953 date. Very frustrating. Thank goodness for Champ's
excellent data sets, but I'm using mine up quickly, and they're no longer
made.

Tim O'Connor

I just looked this up as I was applying proper dates to cars. According to
my 1/53 ORER, page 753, under Rule 11 of Code of Car Service Rules the first
reweigh for all steel house cars was 30 months and 48 months for subsequent
reweighs.

Bill Darnaby


Re: B&O Wagontop Comparison

Tim O'Connor
 

From photos I've seen, the Exactrail car appears to have better
underframe details. On the other hand, besides the doors, Fox Valley
allows their cars to be custom decorated (Spring Mills) so if you're
buying based on excellence of paint & lettering, and are indifferent
to underframes, well, Fox Valley/Spring Mills seems like a good bet.

Unless you're a B&O modeler, how many M-53's do you really need?

Tim O'Connor

A preliminary review indicates neither the Fox valley or the Exactrail
models capture all the details based upon the drawings. If that were the
only gold standard we wouldn't buy any models. That would save us all a
lot of money. All tooling for models have compromises if for no other
reason than limitations in manufacturing techniques.
Bob Witt

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