Date   

Re: Movie Making Mistakes and Prototype Modeling

Rhbale@...
 

Steven Spielburg likes trains and reportedly purchased some models from
Richard Knopf's collection that Sotheby's auctioned in New York in 1997.
Although unsubstantiated at the time (Sotheby's never confirms nor denies the
names of buyers), the rumor was that Spielburg took home several models
including the crown jewel of Knopf's collection which was an Atlas/Nakayama
Kansas City Southern Class J 2-10-4 Texas. It went for $32,200.

Richard Bale
_

In a message dated 12/26/2011 3:03:09 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com writes:




I do hear you Pierre and apparently Anthony Hemmingway/George Lucas and
Steven Spielburg do care. Maybe they are freight car modelers also.

Bill

--- In




_ (http://www.model-railroad-hobbyist.com/) _STMFC@yahoogroups.com_
(mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com) _, "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@...> wrote:

Having spent 30+ years in show biz, I can tell you that the thing to
remember is that most film makers and viewers don't care about the details you
describe.
For them a gun is a gun, a plane is a plane and a train is a train.
After that who cares?
Pierre Oliver

--- In _ (http://www.model-railroad-hobbyist.com/)
_STMFC@yahoogroups.com_ (mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com) , Bill Welch <fgexbill@> wrote:

I just came home from seeing the new movie "War Horse" and also saw
the trailer for "Red Tails" which is about the much decorated
Tuskegee Airmen. Recalling the recent discussion of movie mistakes,
which has now been shut down by the Sheriff, my movie experience
reminded me that no one offered a critique of model railroading
during the time paralleling the movies under discussion, which for
the matching time period might have arguably been more accurately
called "caricature railroading" when compared to contemporary modeling.
> What struck as I watched both the trailer and the movie is that just
as our modeling has evolved, the craft of making movies has evolved.
In War Horse, the German artillery non-com carried a long-barreled
"Artillery Luger" and the British infantry all had the correct Mark
of Enfield rifle and someone made sure the British Mark I "Male"
tank, whether a purpose built_ prop, or restored, was present instead
some fake. Likewise in the movie trailer, the USAAF pilots were in
P-40 Warhawks and P-51D Mustangs and the Germans were in Bf-109 and
even Me-262 Messerschmitts and not some Cessna stand-in. Granted
these may have been CGI but at least someone was paying attention to
the details, just as we have learned to do.

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727.470.9930
fgexbill@



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
_ (http://www.model-railroad-hobbyist.com/)


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: tractor loading

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Doug Harding wrote:
The discussion of tractor loading led a friend to ask me: Is there
anything to the story that in 1947 a wreck in the Chicago area
changed the loading from across the flat car to in line loading of
tractors? He says a friend insists that a wreck in a west suburb
(can't remember the name) on the Burlington was the reason the
government changed the loading style.

I responded "that doesn’t make sense . . . The AAR (not government)
had rules for securing loads, but I don’t believe the government was
ever involved with dictating loading restrictions, except perhaps
for the military."
I agree with you, Doug. And there are certainly photos of
crosswise-loaded tractors after 1947, for example the Allis-Chalmers
tractors on a flat car at Ithaca. New York in 1950, in a photo I
included in my volume on SP flat cars (page 263).

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Cocoa Beach Handout

Bill Welch
 

Steve

I appreciate that but I am not willing to do that.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, steve.sandifer@... wrote:

It would be great if you could share those through the files section of the STMFC site.

--- On Tue, 12/27/11, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:


From: Bill Welch <fgexbill@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Cocoa Beach Handout
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, December 27, 2011, 9:04 AM



 



Friends

I have been working on my Cocoa Beach handout to support my
presentation-- "North From Florida: From the Fields to the Markets
with Fresh Produce" Once again it will be a multi-page affair with
four maps; five different period railroad specific "Perishable
Schedules" (4 pages each) published by the L&N, ACL, SAL, SRR, and
C&WC (w/CRR & C&O); 9 pages of excerpts from the 1940 Perishable
Tariff and 1942 changes; and a Q&A with a retired vegetable, peach
and citrus grower. It looks like it will be about 40 + pages and I
will have to probably charge $5 to cover the copying cost.

I thought it would be better to let as many as possible know
beforehand. If there are leftovers I will let this list and the
reefer list know AFTER Cocoa Beach.

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727.470.9930
fgexbill@...












Re: Greenville 1321CF Covered Hopper - Brakewheel?

Ed Hawkins
 

On Dec 26, 2011, at 7:26 PM, paulbizier wrote:

I'm just finishing a F&C kit for a friend, and am not sure about the
brakewheel. The drawing in the instruction sheet shows what looks like
a Universal, but the brake wheel sent as part of the kit looks more
like the typical Ajax wheel...

Can anybody tell me the appropriate (or closest model) brakewheel for
this kit? Thanks in advance.

Paul Bizier
Paul,
There were 2 series of cars built in 1934, DT&I 11800-11814 and Erie
20000-20049. This is probably not the answer you'd like to hear, but
both series came with Klasing hand brakes.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: tractor flat car loadings

jerryglow2
 

I used to have access to a vinyl cutter with which I intended to make masks. I think my printer guy has one and could cut masks for us if an interest...

Jerry Glow
http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/decals/

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Kurt Laughlin" <fleeta@...> wrote:

The wheel rim is silver where as the center of the wheel is red. . . . . As
for the painting I'm in the same boat. Only 12 to do though. When u guys
come up with a good way to paint them I will be interested to know also.

Taking a tip from tank modeling: Get one of those thin, green plastic,
circle drafting templates. Paint the tire first, ignoring any over spray.
Find the circle size that matches the rim (or silver part) outside diameter
and put tape over the surrounding holes on the template. Then put the
template over the wheel and spray silver/aluminum. Clean off both sides of
the template and find the hole that matches the outside diameter of the red
part. Tape over surrounding holes. Spray the red. Use low air pressure
and shoot straight at the wheel; don't blow paint under the template. Clean
up.

KL





Re: Cocoa Beach Handout

Steve SANDIFER
 

It would be great if you could share those through the files section of the STMFC site.

--- On Tue, 12/27/11, Bill Welch <fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com> wrote:


From: Bill Welch <fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Cocoa Beach Handout
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, December 27, 2011, 9:04 AM



 



Friends

I have been working on my Cocoa Beach handout to support my
presentation-- "North From Florida: From the Fields to the Markets
with Fresh Produce" Once again it will be a multi-page affair with
four maps; five different period railroad specific "Perishable
Schedules" (4 pages each) published by the L&N, ACL, SAL, SRR, and
C&WC (w/CRR & C&O); 9 pages of excerpts from the 1940 Perishable
Tariff and 1942 changes; and a Q&A with a retired vegetable, peach
and citrus grower. It looks like it will be about 40 + pages and I
will have to probably charge $5 to cover the copying cost.

I thought it would be better to let as many as possible know
beforehand. If there are leftovers I will let this list and the
reefer list know AFTER Cocoa Beach.

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727.470.9930
fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: tractor loading

Tim O'Connor
 

Doug

Does he say when the rules supposedly changed? I have a 1963 shot
of a train wreck that includes tractors loaded cross-wise -- 8 of
the tractors are secure and there is an empty spot where 1 evidently
came off the car because another freight car knocked it off (the
end of a reefer intrudes over the end of the flat car).

Tim O'Connor

The discussion of tractor loading led a friend to ask me: Is there anything
to the story that in 1947 a wreck in the Chicago area changed the loading
from across the flat car to in line loading of tractors? He says a friend
insists that a wreck in a west suburb (can't remember the name) on the
Burlington was the reason the government changed the loading style.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: CN box car NSC end

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I concur with Greg. It's an NSC-2 end, available in HO scale from Sylvan Scale Models.

The CN "white leaf" herald shows this car to be from one of three groups of cars built by National Steel Car in 1943 and 1944.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "pge253" <gregkennelly@...> wrote:





--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@> wrote:

Is this an "NSC-1" or an "NSC-2" type end on this CN box car?

http://www.godfatherrails.com/photos/pv.asp?pid=754

Thanks
Tim O'Connor
Hi Tim,

To the best of my knowledge, that's an NSC-2 end. On the NSC-1, the minor vertical ribs were continuous OVER the major horizontal ones. The NSC-3 end did away with the vertical ribbing altogether. The NSC-1, NSC-2 and NSC-3 designations are strictly modellers' terms (originated by Stafford Swain) to distinguish between the evolutionary stages of an end that was simply known as the "National" end in railway trade journals. There appear, also, to have been both early and late versions of the NSC-3 with, IIRC, the late version being more rounded and the early version being more angular in shape.

Thanks for your answer about the ends on Pullman-Standard built 1937 AAR box cars.

Cheers,
Greg Kennelly
Burnaby, BC


Re: L&N 93000-94199

lnnrr <lnnrr@...>
 

This is a pretty chopped up series, spread across two pages in the
diagram book. What they have in common includes being built in 1924
and rebuilt in 1941 by South Louisville shops. Some originally
built by Tennessee Coal & Iron, some by Mt. Vernon Car.
Capy. 100,000 Lt Wt 48500 Youngstown sides Apex running boards
Youngstown steel doors, 6 ft.
Inside Ht. 10'0" Murphy steel roof Miner Hand Brake
Numbers 93286-93299; 93301-93307; 93328-93345 are shown with a
corrugated end but then we know not to take diagrams too seriously.
Numbers 93261-93275; 93285; 93300; 93308-93327; 97086-97087 are
specified as built Murphy corrugated ends at conversion into steel cars
were equipped with S.H. Dreadnaught ends.
Although not specified, I'd guess that the corrugated ends on the
first set were the original Murphy ends.
I don't have the drawing for the trucks but at some point they were
equipped with ASF Ride Control Package Springs.
This is about all I can offer as I don't know when any numbers
were dropped from the company diagram book.
My regrets I can't make it to Cocoa this year.
Chuck Peck

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


I found a partial photo of L&N 94062 (lower right corner) which at
first I thought was a 1937 AAR box car (3713 cuft 10'0" IH) but no,
it's a rebuild of a single sheathed box car. The series is only partly
populated (less than 1/2 full) in the 1950, 1955 and 1959 ORER's, but
is not listed in the 1940 ORER. There is one poor photo of L&N 94046
in the L&N Color Guide, and these are the only two photos I've seen.

http://www.godfatherrails.com/photos/pv.asp?pid=2

Tim O'Connor


Cocoa Beach Handout

Bill Welch
 

Friends

I have been working on my Cocoa Beach handout to support my
presentation-- "North From Florida: From the Fields to the Markets
with Fresh Produce" Once again it will be a multi-page affair with
four maps; five different period railroad specific "Perishable
Schedules" (4 pages each) published by the L&N, ACL, SAL, SRR, and
C&WC (w/CRR & C&O); 9 pages of excerpts from the 1940 Perishable
Tariff and 1942 changes; and a Q&A with a retired vegetable, peach
and citrus grower. It looks like it will be about 40 + pages and I
will have to probably charge $5 to cover the copying cost.

I thought it would be better to let as many as possible know
beforehand. If there are leftovers I will let this list and the
reefer list know AFTER Cocoa Beach.

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727.470.9930
fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com


tractor loading

Douglas Harding
 

The discussion of tractor loading led a friend to ask me: Is there anything
to the story that in 1947 a wreck in the Chicago area changed the loading
from across the flat car to in line  loading of tractors? He says a friend
insists that a wreck in a west suburb (can't remember the name) on the
Burlington was the reason the government changed the loading style.

I responded "that doesn’t make sense. The railroads handled high & wide
loads all the time. The only situation I think of that being the reason, was
if the load had an overhang that exceeded clearances. More likely a new rule
was instated by the railroad, where the wreck occurred, restricting high &
wide loads on that particular section of track. The AAR (not government) had
rules for securing loads, but I don’t believe the government was ever
involved with dictating loading restrictions, except perhaps for the
military."

Does anyone know for sure? I believe the reason was the increased size in
tractors. As they got longer, they no longer fit cross wise on a flatcar.
One would need to study each tractor model, learn it’s length, to determine
when the factory went from crosswise to angled loading styles.

Of interesting note, while searching for photos of flatcar loads of
tractors, I have seen several models of the Lifelike tractor, a Farmall MTA,
with the wheels removed and stacked behind the tractor body which sits up on
blocking. Total wrong. The only reason we see tractors transported this way
is because with wheels they are too tall or too wide, ie very large
tractors. But certainly not a Farmall M or MTA.

My friend reports seeing tractors without rubber tires loaded in Wisc. the
rims were on and had wood blocks wired in so as not to damage the rims. The
reason was these were going to Europe and they were going to furnish the
tires.


Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org


Re: tractor flat car loadings

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

The wheel rim is silver where as the center of the wheel is red. . . . . As
for the painting I'm in the same boat. Only 12 to do though. When u guys
come up with a good way to paint them I will be interested to know also.

Taking a tip from tank modeling: Get one of those thin, green plastic,
circle drafting templates. Paint the tire first, ignoring any over spray.
Find the circle size that matches the rim (or silver part) outside diameter
and put tape over the surrounding holes on the template. Then put the
template over the wheel and spray silver/aluminum. Clean off both sides of
the template and find the hole that matches the outside diameter of the red
part. Tape over surrounding holes. Spray the red. Use low air pressure
and shoot straight at the wheel; don't blow paint under the template. Clean
up.

KL


Re: L&N 93000-94199

al_brown03
 

Sunshine make kits of these cars (64.10-64.13), and there's a photo of L&N 93281 in Sunshine PDS #64A.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Scott Pitzer <scottp459@...> wrote:

I won't swear it's the same series, but I remember one of the pretty-railroad-postcards (Vanishing Vistas or similar) had one of these in a train. Again, a partial view, but it showed the corrugated end. I think I discussed it with Bill Welch, and he's likely to be the go-to- guy (go-to-chai-guy?) for this one anyway.
Scott Pitzer

On Dec 26, 2011, at 10:52 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


I found a partial photo of L&N 94062 (lower right corner) which at
first I thought was a 1937 AAR box car (3713 cuft 10'0" IH) but no,
it's a rebuild of a single sheathed box car. The series is only partly
populated (less than 1/2 full) in the 1950, 1955 and 1959 ORER's, but
is not listed in the 1940 ORER. There is one poor photo of L&N 94046
in the L&N Color Guide, and these are the only two photos I've seen.

http://www.godfatherrails.com/photos/pv.asp?pid=2

Tim O'Connor


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Photo's

Joel Holmes <lehighvalley@...>
 

Hi Mark,

What type of negatives are these? B&W, color, size, etc.

Joel Holmes

I have quite a number of negatives from the 30's & 40's that I need to
make prints from.The problem is I can't find any place or anyone who can
make prints from negatives any more.does anyone here know where I can get
these prints made.Thanks Mark McCoy tavwot@yahoo.com


Re: CN box car NSC end

Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Greg has it right.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "pge253" <gregkennelly@...> wrote:





--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@> wrote:

Is this an "NSC-1" or an "NSC-2" type end on this CN box car?

http://www.godfatherrails.com/photos/pv.asp?pid=754

Thanks
Tim O'Connor
Hi Tim,

To the best of my knowledge, that's an NSC-2 end. On the NSC-1, the minor vertical ribs were continuous OVER the major horizontal ones. The NSC-3 end did away with the vertical ribbing altogether. The NSC-1, NSC-2 and NSC-3 designations are strictly modellers' terms (originated by Stafford Swain) to distinguish between the evolutionary stages of an end that was simply known as the "National" end in railway trade journals. There appear, also, to have been both early and late versions of the NSC-3 with, IIRC, the late version being more rounded and the early version being more angular in shape.

Thanks for your answer about the ends on Pullman-Standard built 1937 AAR box cars.

Cheers,
Greg Kennelly
Burnaby, BC


Re: Photo's

Jeff Coleman
 

Holland Photo is a pro lab in Austin TX, they do excellent work!
http://www.hollandphoto.com/html/

Jeff Coleman

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Mark McCoy wrote:
I have quite a number of negatives from the 30's & 40's that I need
to make prints from.The problem is I can't find any place or anyone
who can make prints from negatives any more.does anyone here know
where I can get these prints made.
Art photographers and hobbyists continue to need photolab
services. Large cities have such labs, and a number of them can be
contacted on line and orders can be placed.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Photo's

RICH CHAPIN
 

Mark,

Gene Collora does very nice dark room prints. Can do most sized negatives except 35mm.

His contact: trnbuffpix@aol.com

Rich Chapin

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "mark" <tavwot@...> wrote:

I have quite a number of negatives from the 30's & 40's that I need to make prints from.The problem is I can't find any place or anyone who can make prints from negatives any more.does anyone here know where I can get these prints made.Thanks Mark McCoy tavwot@...


Re: CN box car NSC end

pge253 <gregkennelly@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Is this an "NSC-1" or an "NSC-2" type end on this CN box car?

http://www.godfatherrails.com/photos/pv.asp?pid=754

Thanks
Tim O'Connor
Hi Tim,

To the best of my knowledge, that's an NSC-2 end. On the NSC-1, the minor vertical ribs were continuous OVER the major horizontal ones. The NSC-3 end did away with the vertical ribbing altogether. The NSC-1, NSC-2 and NSC-3 designations are strictly modellers' terms (originated by Stafford Swain) to distinguish between the evolutionary stages of an end that was simply known as the "National" end in railway trade journals. There appear, also, to have been both early and late versions of the NSC-3 with, IIRC, the late version being more rounded and the early version being more angular in shape.

Thanks for your answer about the ends on Pullman-Standard built 1937 AAR box cars.

Cheers,
Greg Kennelly
Burnaby, BC


Re: Photo's

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Mark McCoy wrote:
I have quite a number of negatives from the 30's & 40's that I need to make prints from.The problem is I can't find any place or anyone who can make prints from negatives any more.does anyone here know where I can get these prints made.
Art photographers and hobbyists continue to need photolab services. Large cities have such labs, and a number of them can be contacted on line and orders can be placed.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: L&N 93000-94199

Scott Pitzer
 

I won't swear it's the same series, but I remember one of the pretty-railroad-postcards (Vanishing Vistas or similar) had one of these in a train. Again, a partial view, but it showed the corrugated end. I think I discussed it with Bill Welch, and he's likely to be the go-to- guy (go-to-chai-guy?) for this one anyway.
Scott Pitzer

On Dec 26, 2011, at 10:52 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:


I found a partial photo of L&N 94062 (lower right corner) which at
first I thought was a 1937 AAR box car (3713 cuft 10'0" IH) but no,
it's a rebuild of a single sheathed box car. The series is only partly
populated (less than 1/2 full) in the 1950, 1955 and 1959 ORER's, but
is not listed in the 1940 ORER. There is one poor photo of L&N 94046
in the L&N Color Guide, and these are the only two photos I've seen.

http://www.godfatherrails.com/photos/pv.asp?pid=2

Tim O'Connor


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

80741 - 80760 of 186232