Date   

Re: Scalpel Blades/Handles Suppliers and Best Choices

mt19a <LarrynLynnHanlon@...>
 

Hi Bill,

another busy day today ...

I can't help too much with online sources as my blades came from a friend in the medical field. He had been bugging me for years about using them instead of Xacto, and finally gave me some to make me a believer. They are vastly sharper, and therefore much less force is necessary when cutting.

I see a typo in what I wrote; it should have said #15 and 15C blades. The 15C has a recess near the shank that is not sharpened, making it easier to control the cutting location eg not hit nearby details. Beyond that I couldn't have said it better than Tom -- the 15 gets into small spaces and gives very good control over cutting without the risk of an accidental gouge that the point on a #11 can easily do.

It is also far better than my sprue cutter for cleanly removing parts from a sprue with very little force.

I use the #11 for decals. I have some #10 which I've tried for general purpose apps, however I'm going to look into #16 instead because of the defined and sturdy end to the cutting edge that it has.

I also have #12, which as mentioned is good for scraping out narrow spaces but creeps me out because if you slip, that sharp edge is likely headed right at your hand.

For the larger #4 handle the #20 and #36 blades look to be good for general purpose apps, cutting wood, scoring styrene, etc., but I haven't tried them yet. Now I probably will. :)

One source with illustrations of the blade designs is

http://www.swann-morton.com/product_range/1.php

Hope this helps!

And Happy New Year to all.

Larry Hanlon.
Bend, OR

--- In STMFC@..., "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

People seem to be misunderstanding my earlier post so I will try to be more precise. After reading Larry Hanlon's post about Surgical Scalpel Blades and Handles, I found several sources for Surgical Instruments, including the "#15 or #12C scalpel blade" and "size 3 [Scalpel] handle."

I had never thought about buying such cutting tools but given their size and time tested design, I think I will spring for some. My question is "What surgical blades and handle sizes have people who have used such instruments found handy as hobby tools in addition to the sizes Larry identified?" I am also interested in which online Surgical Supply sources, if any, individuals like doing business with? There are many.

I have found the typical #11 hobby blade often unwieldy and I am doing most work now with a single edge razor blade

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "lnbill" <fgexbill@> wrote:

Larry and others

I Googled "#15 or #12C scalpel blade" and found several sources. Does anyone have a favorite source? Also what other handle sizes and blade types have people found helpful?

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "mt19a" <LarrynLynnHanlon@> wrote:


Hi Steve,

one of these mornings when the mood is right I plan to use a new #15 or #12C scalpel blade in a size 3 handle. Much sharper than X-Acto, you can controllably remove as little as a few thousandths at a time, even on acetal plastics.

Larry Hanlon.
Bend, OR


Re: Plain -v- Roller bearings (Was-Stock car reloading )

John H <sprinthag@...>
 

No.

"Probably due to molecular action." I.e., the molecules are in movement within the lubricant. Not a blob of oil moving through the air.

John Hagen

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


So if your theory is correct that oil heats up with movement,
if I pour a can of oil off a 1,000 foot tower in a perfect vacuum,
the oil will be hotter when it hits the ground?


So far as friction with cold lube, probably less than with hot lube. Cold oil is thicker than warm stuff. It also is quite resistent to movement. Try pushing your car when it is zero and hasn't been moved for some time. And your car has roller bearings. I think it has to do with the cohesivness of the oil. But once it gets moving, the oil will heat up on its own. Probably due to molecular action.

John Hagen


Re: Stock car reloading - was CN Stock Cars in the USA

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

I've always referred to these as "plain bearings", which is the term used at CN (whom I work for as a conductor and loco engineer) and cited in Railway Association of Canada literature to this day.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "dmamfahr" <mamfahr@...> wrote:

I (and others on this list) are therefore opposed to the use of "friction bearings" in STMFC posts.

Richard Hendrickson,

Objection noted. As someone who has been around railroads since the '70s and worked with them since the early '80s, that's just the term I've most often heard and the term I commonly use. That despite the fact that the term may not be technically correct...

If you're opposed to use of an "everyday railroad term" here, I'll try to refrain from using it on this particular list. After many years I'm still trying to train myself to use other "more appropriate" terms such as "thermal misalignment" instead of the traditional term "sun kink", or "flight attendant" rather than "stewardess" and "administrative assistant" instead of "secretary". I'm not always free from error, so please forgive me if I slip up from time to time...


Take care,

Mark Amfahr


Re: Duryea Cushion Underframe

Jim Mischke
 

I would add:

There is only so much room for springs in conventional draft gear, only several inches of travel, which has to be stiff and bottoms out (goes solid) in short order.

With a Duryea underframe, there is much more room for springs and travel, it was tuned so that it never bottomed out (went solid), reducing the transmitted slack action shock for the lading, the couplers and benefited the rest of the train.

The savings were both in damage claims for freight and in fewer broken knuckles and draft gear.

--- In STMFC@..., Steve Vallee <stvvallee@...> wrote:

Dear Group...

   I spotted this tidbit that I would like to share with the Group. On page 65 of the April, 1942 issue of Railroad Magazine, I found this Q&A:


 Q)... Publish information about the Duryea Cushion Underframe.

 A)... The Duryea Cushion Underframe was first demonstrated at the Butler, Pa., plant of the Standard Steel Car Co. in Dec. 1927. It is designed to permit the control of slack and of energy absorption capacity separately, each to meet the most desirable operating conditions, without the need of compromise between them. Three points mark the individuality of the design, namely, (1) a center draft still capable of restricted movement with respect to the car body proper, (2), a coupler gear, and (3) a long-travel, high capacity cushion gear, one each of the latter two at each end of the car. Shock absorbing devices are provided in car construction to protect against two principal classes of impacts: those resulting from surges in train movements, and those caused by heavy impacts in switching.

  The force of an impact at the face of the coupler of a car equipped with a Duryea Underframe must pass successively through the coupler, coupler gear, movable center sill, cushion gears, body bolster, and body members, before reaching the car lading, so that only a very small part of even the most severe impacts can ever reach the car lading uncushioned. The resilient attachment of a center sill, instead of employing conventional rigid underframe construction, protects body, lading, underframe and trucks against shock.

  The B&O was the first railroad to adopt this underframe as standard for its freight equipment.


  Steve Vallee








Re: True Line new "Fowler" pictures

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

Seems to me that Proto scaled down the prototype truck bolster height above top of rail (ATR) rather than using the NMRA's preferred or standard HO scale bolster height. I have a Westerfield CN 36' steel-frame boxcar kit that had .040" pads moulded into the underframe. Take these off, and the Proto truck works beautifully, giving the right height ATR for the carbody and couplers.

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@...> wrote:

Yes, one would think so?
It's something TLT did that I've never understood.
Pierre

--- In STMFC@..., "armprem2" <armprem2@> wrote:

Thank you Pierre.One would think that they could revise the truck and make it available for a broad market.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
From: Pierre
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, December 30, 2011 1:53 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: True Line new "Fowler" pictures



Armand,
Currently, TLT is the only source for Simplex bolster trucks.
They are reasonably well executed and certainly up to todays stasndards.
Just one important detail. They are made with the truck bolster .040" higher than most other trucks on the market. The internal construction of the TLT bolster requires that the modeler remove material from the body bolster to lower the car to the correct height.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "armprem2" <armprem2@> wrote:
>
> The cars were equipped with Simplex trucks.Does anyone know of another source for these trucks?Armand Premo
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: Tim O'Connor
> To: STMFC@...
> Sent: Thursday, December 29, 2011 11:08 PM
> Subject: [STMFC] Re: True Line new "Fowler" pictures
>
>
>
>
> Interesting. One of the NP guys measured some boards on an NP box car
> as 5.5" wide with a V groove in the middle. Do you or anyone have more
> information about ARA standards for siding, and the years in which the
> standards were in force? At some point, judging from photos and from
> some drawings, it seems that the milled boards were replaced with plain
> T&G boards.
>
> Tim O'Connor
>
> >Any of the Canadian experts care to comment on the width of the boards on that wood door? They appear to be the same width as the side sheathing, which would make them 5-1/4" wide. The ARA did have a standard section 5-1/4" wide T&G car siding, but it was milled with an extra V grove in the middle of the board, so gave the appearance of 2-5/8" wide boards. Train Miniature missed this point about forty years ago, as have others since. Did the Canadian roads really use a non standard car siding, or has TLT misinterpreted the drawing call out that says the doors are 5-1/4" T&G?
> >
> >Dennis
>
>
>
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>







Re: Stock car reloading

Steve SANDIFER
 

The only detailed information I have on shipping out sheep after resting comes from 1939, Purcell, OK.
http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Clinics/Stk/Purcell.htm

Normally stock was reloaded into the same car they arrived in. The major exception was stock that arrived in foreign cars. 82 foreign cars were unloaded at Purcell and 51 of those were sent home empty as the stock was transferred to ATSF cars. In at least one case, two TNO cars of sheep were reloaded into one double deck ATSF car. In another case, a TNO car was unloaded and the stock moved to ATSF, but they evidently ran out of ATSF cars or needed to forward the TNO to a specific place so that a later shipment went out in the TNO car.


Railroad Loads in Loads out
ATSF 199 250
ESLJ 1 0
MP 4 4
PRR 1 1
SP 29 9
TNO 29 9
TP 18 8

______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
From: Anthony Thompson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, December 29, 2011 2:11 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Stock car reloading



Don Valentine wrote:
> Your comment raises and interesting point, Bruce, which I have not
> considered before. The rules for unloading and resting livestock are
> fairly well known but I do not recall having seen anything on one
> aspect of such mocvements. Is there anything that dictates what cars
> the stock must be reloaded into??? In this case, could the CN stock
> car be unloaded for a rest stop, returned home empty and the stock
> be reloaded into another stock car to continue their trip????

We've been told in previous discussions that it was very COMMON
to reload stock into the cars of the home road doing the resting, and
send the foreign empties home. Either way, the reloading cars had to
be well CLEANED and with fresh bedding. I would think this might be
especially commonplace with Canadian empties in the U.S., unless there
was a local car shortage.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: True Line new "Fowler" pictures

Steve SANDIFER
 

I pulled out my Proto 1000 Fowler stock car produced 5-6 years ago, and at least one of the photos on the True Train website (6516155663_96a6ed6b6d_z.jpg) is this same molding, as you can see the "Made in China" on the underside. All of the gray stock car photos look identical. However, another photo (6516163737_52db7a46a7_z.jpg) on their website, one of the box car, shows a different undercarriage with different placement of the triple valve and air tank and greater detail. The Proto had a metal floor and underbody to give it weight. I would not be surprised if this model uses the same mold for most of the body, which was excellent in the Proto 1000, and simply detailed the underbody.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
From: Eric
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, December 29, 2011 7:15 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: True Line new "Fowler" pictures



Tim,

Here are a couple of circa 1925 images taken along the Wheeling & Lake Erie in Canton, Ohio. These images are from the W&LE archives in the Michael Schwartz Library of Cleveland State University Library in Cleveland, Ohio. Two Canadian Pacific Fowler box cars and an ERIE double-sheathed box car with an indestructible-type of end are spotted along a siding just north of the W&LE depot. Click on the images for the full version.

This view looks north:
http://www.hansmanns.org/images/canton_industry_1.JPG

This view is pointed south:
http://www.hansmanns.org/images/canton_industry_2.JPG

Does anyone have in-service numbers for the CP and CN Fower fleet in the mid-1950s? The Westerfield Models site has details that note 75,000 of the six-foot wide door were built, while the Canadian Pacific built 33,000 of the five-foot wide door versions. These numbers do not include stock cars or 40-foot versions of the car design.

Eric

Eric Hansmann
New Paltz, NY

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
>
> Did these cars come to the US much? For their huge numbers I
> can't recall any photos of them south of the border in the 1940's
> and later.
>
> Tim O'Connor


Re: Is it a TPW 10'IH PS-1? (UNCLASSIFIED)

kmelvin1663 <melvinphotos@...>
 

Elden and List,

The MEC car is a modified 1932 ARA with an 8 foot door put on by the Maine Central in the early 1960s, renunbered into 24000 series. Abacus Models has this variation in their list of future kits, see link:

http://www.abacusmodelworks.com/abacus.3001.pdf
George Melvin

Readfield, Maine

PS....Happy New Year everyone!

--- In STMFC@..., "Gatwood, Elden SAW" <elden.j.gatwood@...> wrote:

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Folks;

Could you take a look at this TP&W box car and tell me what you think its
ancestry is? It looks like a 10'IH early PS-1, blt Apr 1948, with the
rounded end ribs, the notched bolster tabs and all, and a short Superior
door, but I think you know better than I...

http://www.godfatherrails.com/photos/pv.asp?pid=967

There looks like a short series of cars in series 5000 to 5042 that might be
these, but I don't know. The capacity listed doesn't match. The only other
10'IH cars on the TP&W were a steel sheathed car in series 1350 - 1352, or
some added c.1964 in series 1355-1371. Given what looks like an original
"41" at the end of the original car number, I don't think it is either.

There's also another car I am curious about on the slide of the PC box car.
It looks like an MEC boxcar being loaded, and I am curious about it, too.
What is that door?

After doing a couple books with John, I am looking forward to remaining
freight car slides from his collection coming to light.

Any thoughts? Thanks,

Elden Gatwood



Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


Re: Scalpel Blades/Handles Suppliers and Best Choices

sctry
 

Another possibility is the X-acto #4; it comes with a collet style handle and 5 double ended blades. The blades are o.125" wide x 0.0025" thick. I promoted this tool in the 2011 Shake-N-Take clinic for removing molded on ladder runs (from Steam Era Freight Cars).

J. Greedy

--- In STMFC@..., "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

People seem to be misunderstanding my earlier post so I will try to be more precise. After reading Larry Hanlon's post about Surgical Scalpel Blades and Handles, I found several sources for Surgical Instruments, including the "#15 or #12C scalpel blade" and "size 3 [Scalpel] handle."

I had never thought about buying such cutting tools but given their size and time tested design, I think I will spring for some. My question is "What surgical blades and handle sizes have people who have used such instruments found handy as hobby tools in addition to the sizes Larry identified?" I am also interested in which online Surgical Supply sources, if any, individuals like doing business with? There are many.

I have found the typical #11 hobby blade often unwieldy and I am doing most work now with a single edge razor blade

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "lnbill" <fgexbill@> wrote:

Larry and others

I Googled "#15 or #12C scalpel blade" and found several sources. Does anyone have a favorite source? Also what other handle sizes and blade types have people found helpful?

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "mt19a" <LarrynLynnHanlon@> wrote:


Hi Steve,

one of these mornings when the mood is right I plan to use a new #15 or #12C scalpel blade in a size 3 handle. Much sharper than X-Acto, you can controllably remove as little as a few thousandths at a time, even on acetal plastics.

Larry Hanlon.
Bend, OR


Re: Scalpel Blades/Handles Suppliers and Best Choices

ghslaw31
 

I agree the #11 blade is best for what you want. MM has a padded handle for a few bucks which I found the most comfortable to use. Also there is a hooked blade, number escapes me, but is in their catalog. Very helpful for cleaning thin slots and getting paint out.
Gerry Siegel


Re: True Line new "Fowler" pictures

soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "armprem2" <armprem2@...> wrote:

Thank you Dennis for your help.Having looked at the TL Simplex trucks they seem to have a shorter wheel base and if I recall correctly have Simplex embossed on the truck side frame.Armand Premo
Shouldn't, since Simplex didn't make trucks, and the ARA had already standardized the wheelbase of both 40 and 50 ton trucks at 5'-6". Simplex did cast their name rather prominently on the cast end cap of their fabricated bolsters, however.

Here's a pic from the TLT web page of the truck under their pre-production Dominion car:

http://farm8.static.flickr.com/7018/6516164547_9fe88aeff2_z.jpg

Looks like a plain Jane ARA cast truck with spring plank to me... not even a double truss design, which is correct for trucks from this era.


Re: Scalpel Blades/Handles Suppliers and Best Choices

Tom Madden
 

Bill, like you I find the single edge razor blade has become my tool of choice when I need a very sharp and very stable cutting blade. I do use a #15 scalpel blade in a #3 handle, not so much for slicing but for scraping. The small, curved blade gets into most any restricted space and, if you work the blade at a shallow angle on the surface of your workpiece, there are no "corners" to dig into and gouge the surface. Much better than, say, a #11 blade for that purpose. I've used #11 scalpel blades but prefer the #11 X-Acto blade for the type of cutting I tend to do with that style blade. The #11 X-Acto blade is much more stable than the #11 scalpel blade and much more suitable for scoring styrene sheet.

I see Amazon.com has boxes of 100 #15 scalpel blades for $19.95, which is more than enough to last any of us through this lifetime and the next.

Tom Madden

--- In STMFC@..., "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

People seem to be misunderstanding my earlier post so I will try to be more precise. After reading Larry Hanlon's post about Surgical Scalpel Blades and Handles, I found several sources for Surgical Instruments, including the "#15 or #12C scalpel blade" and "size 3 [Scalpel] handle."

I had never thought about buying such cutting tools but given their size and time tested design, I think I will spring for some. My question is "What surgical blades and handle sizes have people who have used such instruments found handy as hobby tools in addition to the sizes Larry identified?" I am also interested in which online Surgical Supply sources, if any, individuals like doing business with? There are many.

I have found the typical #11 hobby blade often unwieldy and I am doing most work now with a single edge razor blade

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "lnbill" <fgexbill@> wrote:

Larry and others

I Googled "#15 or #12C scalpel blade" and found several sources. Does anyone have a favorite source? Also what other handle sizes and blade types have people found helpful?

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "mt19a" <LarrynLynnHanlon@> wrote:


Hi Steve,

one of these mornings when the mood is right I plan to use a new #15 or #12C scalpel blade in a size 3 handle. Much sharper than X-Acto, you can controllably remove as little as a few thousandths at a time, even on acetal plastics.

Larry Hanlon.
Bend, OR


Re: True Line new "Fowler" pictures

Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Armand,
The trucks have a 5'6" wheelbase and do indeed have Simplex engraved in the bolster face.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "armprem2" <armprem2@...> wrote:

Thank you Dennis for your help.Having looked at the TL Simplex trucks they seem to have a shorter wheel base and if I recall correctly have Simplex embossed on the truck side frame.Armand Premo
----- Original Message -----
From: soolinehistory
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, December 30, 2011 3:51 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: True Line new "Fowler" pictures





--- In STMFC@..., "armprem2" <armprem2@> wrote:
>
> The cars were equipped with Simplex trucks.Does anyone know of another source for these trucks?Armand Premo

Might I point out that the Simplex name only refereed to the truck BOLSTER? Car trucks and bolsters could, and were, purchased separately. So, these are (whatever) trucks with Simplex bolsters.

Dennis





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Stock car reloading - was CN Stock Cars in the USA

al_brown03
 

For a story about a Rutland freight that left Norwood, N.Y., at 20 below zero after a two-day blizzard, and got hotbox after hotbox: see Nimke, "Rutland: 60 Years of Trying", vol 6 pt 2, p 27.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., FRANK PEACOCK <frank3112@...> wrote:


Mark, I seem to remember talking to someone on the UP (conductor, brakeman) that was working during the steam era that said that hot boxes were more common during either the spring or fall when temp. was changing. Due to different journal oil in different seasons? Have you seen evidence of this? On freight cars of course, just in case our leader, and head jailor, is watching. FHP (FHPeacock)

To: STMFC@...
From: mamfahr@...
Date: Fri, 30 Dec 2011 17:51:13 +0000
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Stock car reloading - was CN Stock Cars in the USA




























> When did the UP introduce the roller bearing equipped UP "Dispatch" stock cars into service? ...I wonder if the UP was reloading stock into these cars at this time to be able to run the trains faster -- I seem to recall these special trains were able to skip at least one rest stop, perhaps Las Vegas?



Hello Tim,



Frank provided you with the info on the cars, I'll add a few comments related to their operation. I don't believe the roller bearing cars materially impacted train speeds vs. use of conventional friction bearing cars. Even with the addition of the 100s of "Dispatch" cars in the late '40s, note that shipments of livestock on the LA&SL trains were still moved using a mix of livestock car types, with a significant % being friction bearing cars from UP and from foreign roads. The promotional photos along the LS&SL at the time that (seem to) depict solid trains of new yellow "Dispatch" cars are deceiving in that respect. They were still running many brown UP cars along with cars from NP, CNW, CB&Q and others on those trains. So the mix of cartypes on those trains (friction bearing stock cars + cars often added to the trains as "fill") would have limited train speeds even if the new "Dispatch" cars were able to run faster…



The main advantage of roller bearings in those early years was that they greatly improved reliability of shipments - fewer en-route delays due to hotboxes, etc. Hotboxes were a real problem for RRs in the steam era. On the UP, I've noticed something on the order of one hot-box set out (en-route) per subdivision per day on average. As you may imagine, it was much more problematic to deal with a bad-order livestock shipment vs. the typical carload of freight. This was especially true when a hotbox or other problem made it necessary to set out a livestock car at some remote station in southern Nevada where the temps are normally in the range of hot-to-unbearable.



It's my understanding that the principal factor that made it possible for UP to eliminate the Las Vegas feed/water/rest stop was the installation of CTC. As wartime traffic dropped off, the additional capacity & flexibility provided by the CTC installation (vs. the TT&TO operation they'd been using) made it possible for them to run the DLS trains from Ogden/SLC - LA run in under 36 hours. Operation with diesels also began around that time, which further improved running times and performance vs. schedules.



So it wasn't so much the cars, but rather the way that they operated their trains that allowed them to eliminate the intermediate stop for livestock in the late '40s.



Take care,



Mark




















C&NW stock cars

ron christensen
 

I was told Sunshine was going to produce a C&NW stock car. Lloyd Keyser had worked on this with them.
Can anyone tell me if it is in production?
Ron Christensen


Re: Plain -v- Roller bearings (Was-Stock car reloading )

Tim O'Connor
 

So if your theory is correct that oil heats up with movement,
if I pour a can of oil off a 1,000 foot tower in a perfect vacuum,
the oil will be hotter when it hits the ground?

So far as friction with cold lube, probably less than with hot lube. Cold oil is thicker than warm stuff. It also is quite resistent to movement. Try pushing your car when it is zero and hasn't been moved for some time. And your car has roller bearings. I think it has to do with the cohesivness of the oil. But once it gets moving, the oil will heat up on its own. Probably due to molecular action.

John Hagen


M&StL box car project

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Inspired by Clark Propst's clinic at the Lisle meeting last October, I selected a box car to build for M&StL. It's only a stand- in, but the modeling techniques I used might be of interest to some. I've posted a description on my blog, which can be seen at:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2011/12/modeling-project-m-box-car.html

And for those who are traveling to Cocoa Beach next week, I will be bringing the model to display there.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Scalpel Blades/Handles Suppliers and Best Choices

Bill Welch
 

People seem to be misunderstanding my earlier post so I will try to be more precise. After reading Larry Hanlon's post about Surgical Scalpel Blades and Handles, I found several sources for Surgical Instruments, including the "#15 or #12C scalpel blade" and "size 3 [Scalpel] handle."

I had never thought about buying such cutting tools but given their size and time tested design, I think I will spring for some. My question is "What surgical blades and handle sizes have people who have used such instruments found handy as hobby tools in addition to the sizes Larry identified?" I am also interested in which online Surgical Supply sources, if any, individuals like doing business with? There are many.

I have found the typical #11 hobby blade often unwieldy and I am doing most work now with a single edge razor blade

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

Larry and others

I Googled "#15 or #12C scalpel blade" and found several sources. Does anyone have a favorite source? Also what other handle sizes and blade types have people found helpful?

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "mt19a" <LarrynLynnHanlon@> wrote:


Hi Steve,

one of these mornings when the mood is right I plan to use a new #15 or #12C scalpel blade in a size 3 handle. Much sharper than X-Acto, you can controllably remove as little as a few thousandths at a time, even on acetal plastics.

Larry Hanlon.
Bend, OR


Solid/roller Bearings

mike brock <brockm@...>
 

From the book The Steam Locomotive by Ralph Johnson, Chief Engineer of Baldwin Locomotive Works: :

"A solid bearing, when the train is at rest for any appreciable time, loses the oil film which separates the axle and brass, and when the train is started this oil film must be built up again by the rotation of the axle. With the film present, at speeds from 5 to 10 mph and up, the molecules act as ball bearings and journal friction is rapidly reduced. The roller bearing has the advantage of substantially reducing the starting friction due to its line contact rather than the solid contact of the solid bearing."

"As the speed of the train increases the difference in frictional resistance between the two types of bearings decreases rapidly, and above a speed of 10 miles per hour the difference becomes very small. In cold weather the starting resistance of a train with solid bearings is quite high, and therefore the acceleration of a train equipped with roller bearings is aided very materially."

and: "The actual economy in the use of of roller bearings is found in lower maintenance costs, reduced inspection and economy in lubrication..."

Mike Brock


Re: Scalpel Blades/Handles Suppliers and Best Choices

Charles Whitlatch
 

I also use primarily the #11 and get them from mcmaster.com who always have something else I "need". I have only used the basic handles frequently sold at train shows and also McMaster.

Charles Whitlatch

--- In STMFC@..., Brian Ehni <behni@...> wrote:

I like the #11 myself; used to get them from my father. Haven't tried asking
my brother or sister, but they're good choices, too (for me, anyway � 8^)).

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