Date   

Re: CB&Q caboose trucks

feddersenmark
 

In contrast to the Walthers truck, which has a 5' axle spacing, the BCW truck has a 6' axle spacing and is therefore, inappropriate for the 5' spacing of the CB&Q and C&NW prototypes. Mark Feddersen

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Lotz" <Dave_Lotz@...> wrote:

Trust me, I KNOW that he has them…the web site is just not updated with the
newly purchased trucks.

Dave


Posted by: "Brian Paul Ehni" behni@...
<mailto:behni@...?Subject=%20Re%3A%20CB%26Q%20caboose%20trucks>
brianehni <http://profiles.yahoo.com/brianehni>


Fri Jan 6, 2012 7:21 pm (PST)

Those are shown on his details page as no longer available. 8^(
--
Thanks!

Brian Paul Ehni



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Required Ice

Steve Vallee
 

Dear Group...

   While looking through the January, 1948 issue of Railroad Magazine, on page 76, I noticed this tidbit on refrigerator cars:


  Q)...How much ice is required yearly for the hauling of perishable foods by railroad refrigerator cars in the United States?

  A)...Latest figures available, 1946, shows that it took thirteen million tons to deliver fresh and unspoiled food to American dinner tables last year. Much of this total is required for pre-icing and initial icing of the cars at large reefer shipping terminals like the Espee's Roseville, California Yard. Less ice is needed for re-icing enroute. Bunkers of some of the larger cars will hold 30,000 pounds of ice. The refrigerated ride is no longer reserved for delicacies. The increased use
of frozen foods of all types, and the expanding use of dry ice, particularly in combination with natural ice, has led to the hauling of nearly all food by refrigerator cars. Mechanical cooling units in the cars are now looked upon as a practical development not far in the future.


  Steve Vallee





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


FW: Re: Woodland Scenics Burns!

charles slater
 

It looks like they are OK.
Charlie Slater




To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
From: jack@yosemitevalleyrr.com
Date: Fri, 6 Jan 2012 17:32:26 -0800
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Re: Woodland Scenics Burns!






Someone on another list posted the following:

Just noticed this update posted to the Atlas Forum:

"Dear all,

As you may have heard we have experienced a fire here at Woodland Scenics
and there is good news and bad news. The good news is that no one was hurt
during the fire or evacuation process. The bad news is that it took out a
couple of our manufacturing buildings. However, and fortunately, there is
more good news than bad.

We encompass multiple buildings that are spread out all over the town of
Linn Creek. We only lost two of those buildings and those two contained just
a small portion of our manufacturing facilities. Our shipping department,
warehouse and corporate offices were spared any damage, as were most of our
manufacturing buildings, so it is business as usual.

Thanks for all your concerns.

Respectfully,

Gale Cousins
Director of Sales & Customer Service
Woodland Scenics"






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: CB&Q caboose trucks

Dave Lotz
 

Trust me, I KNOW that he has them…the web site is just not updated with the
newly purchased trucks.

Dave


Posted by: "Brian Paul Ehni" behni@comcast.net
<mailto:behni@comcast.net?Subject=%20Re%3A%20CB%26Q%20caboose%20trucks>
brianehni <http://profiles.yahoo.com/brianehni>


Fri Jan 6, 2012 7:21 pm (PST)

Those are shown on his details page as no longer available. 8^(
--
Thanks!

Brian Paul Ehni



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Owlmtmodels - New HO detail parts now offering

owlmtmodels
 

Greetings fellow Steam Era modelers,
As some of you in the SP modeling community already know, Owl Mountain Models is now producing and shipping two styles of 5 inch safety vents HO detail parts for earlier tank cars as follows;

#1001 "Single" L-vent (for smaller cars)
#1002 "Twin" L-vent (for larger cars)

Please visit www.owlmtmodels.com to see more details and photos of these products. I look forward to supplying more quality products to my fellow modelers for many years to come.

Sincerely,
Jason Hill
Owl Mountain Models


Cocoa Beach Prototype Rails - Small scale manufacturing

devansprr
 

All,

An interesting discussion this evening. I wanted to get a bunch of thoughts down on paper in hopes of stimulating additional thought. I think Bill was proposing a very good idea - is there a way to make it happen? Maybe a "tasker" is for the STMFC group to come up with a proposal by next year's meet? Can't beat the weather to have this discussion ;-)

I would like to document two topics that I think the group discussed as critical to making this happen:

1) Finding a marketing and distribution method for small scale manufacturing

2) Increasing the number of small manufacturers

I have one idea for topic 2, so I will mention that first.

Would it make sense to invite one (or several) of the resin casting suppliers to this, or other, RPM meets, to introduce more modelers to casting fine scale parts. Or perhaps invite one of the guys who sells instructional DVD's on casting. Both would have an economic incentive to attend.

I can understand why the experienced casters on the panel are reluctant to spend their limited time teaching others how to cast - there is very little for them to gain from this - but there is for casting suppliers.

Then include a hands on clinic much like the shake and take? Let people actually cast the part? Perhaps a series of clinics, making patterns the first evening, casting the second, and using the part the third? Just pattern and cast a new box car door or end that could be used with an existing kit? Is there a common box car that had a wide range of doors applied across many roads, but the majority of the doors are not available for the kit? Make a bunch of the patterns the first night (bring the plans/photos in advance, then just build from styrene), and by the third night, a variety of cars with different doors could be assembled.

Alternatively, perhaps some manner of brass etching experience could also work as a multi-session experience (an odd roof walk, or hopper end frame, or tank car platform that would work with an existing kit?)


Topic 1 above is a bigger challenge. It seems everyone on the panel did not want to burn their modeling time on distribution/fulfillment and marketing. And there was some reluctance to do any significant volume of manufacturing - make the pattern, prove it works, and then let someone else cast it.

To have any chance of solving this problem, a very low-cost method for marketing, distribution, and low rate casting seems to be necessary.

The question critical to distribution is how to create a low-volume, very low overhead, business model, that will likely pay some level of income, perhaps comparable to a second, part-time job, to one person. (Bottom line, assuming that some form of super efficient marketing and fulfillment process exists, is there a market for at least $40k/year of these parts, such that someone doing all of the fulfillment work can make $10k/$20k per year?)

I think what we seek is almost a mini-Walthers distributor, willing to sell parts in the $3-$10 dollar range in single quantities. I doubt we can find anyone willing to finance a large inventory, and this drives us towards the CO-OP model. Casters would have to be willing to make at least a few parts at risk, so the distributor could quickly ship, and so the caster is not shipping individual items (and likely casting individual items, which was reported by the panel to be unacceptable - if they cast, they want to cast and ship in volume (10 to 100 at a time?))

Early on in the dsitributorship, casters would likely be manufacturing as if for a consignment sale (payment on sale), and the distributor is getting a commission when the item is sold. If the market proves to be viable enough, it might possibly lead to people willing to cast (but not make the patterns), who could buy patterns and cast the parts themselves (you might be able to establish an e-bay like auction for patterns so the casters end up competing.)

There would need to be some "policing" of this - perhaps in order to join the COOP and be allowed to use it for distribution, a pattern maker/caster would have to agree not to infringe on any intellectual property. If they did so without permission, they would be banished or penalized.

Bottom line is that someone would need to be receiving parts in batches, bagging them, making them available for purchase on a web site, and then fulfilling the orders. One would expect that would require at least $10/hr of net revenue (after shipping and other costs), perhaps even $20/hr.

As a part time job, that might require selling say 30 parts per day, with $1 net revenue to the distributor for each part, and be able to bag, ship, and collect payment for each item in about 3-6 minutes.

Between using paypal for payment, and leveraging USPS's desire to support e-bay shippers, that might be possible.

I suspect there would be some easy, low-cost inventory programs that could print bag closers using printer address labels, perhaps with barcodes, when first bagging the aprts, and then use a barcode wand on a PC for inventory management and billing during shipment.


Marketing is the other big challenge, and here a COOP, based on using a Yahoo! group, and with help from the Hobby's e-zines (the historical societies and Model Railroad Hobbbyist), may provide a viable solution.

What was HOYARDSALE, and is now HOInterchange, may be a good example. For those of you not familiar, it is effectively a mini-e-bay "Buy-it-now" group, which often posts 25 items for sale per day. People with stuff to sell post a "FS (for Sale) messgae. The Yahoo groups functionality effectively does all the marketing, but the fulfillment is strictly between the buyer and seller. Paypal is often used for payment.

For a group focused on fine-scale parts, one option would be to use messages to post part availability. For example, a standard message subject format could be established that people could easily use the yahoo search to locate:

SUBJECT: "HO TM Dome Walkway Welch - available" or "HO PRR X29B Door Funaro - discontinued"

Only suppliers would be able to post messages, and the distributor would use moderated status to first verify the sender (pattern maker/caster), establish a part number, and check that the message is properly formatted.

The body of the message would include an announcement date, part number (something the caster would need to get from the distributor), and specific details such as applicability (Walkway appeared on type X tank cars manufactured by ACF from 1932-1954), etc.

The same Yahoo! group could use the files section to save single page pdf files with perhaps a picture and more detailed instructions, prototype use, etc, and could be placed in the files folder, perhaps by the distributor's part number. PDF's have become VERY easy to generate for those who are computer literate. For those modelers not wanting to expend the time on producing an easily read document, the distributor could be paid a small fee to draft and publish the pdf, and the fee paid by the pattern maker, perhaps using the revenue from the first batch of parts sold.

Payments could be through Paypal. Many "serious hobbyist grade" custom telescope parts are sold in this manner - often a hobbyist selling direct to another hobbyist. Because there are a limited number of mass-produced telescopes, only a few web sites are required to aggregate the parts (the number of parts is small, and the unit costs are higher than resin box car doors, so the distribution and marketing portions of the business model is different).

And I would think the e-zines would happily list product announcements.

I think the key in all of this, especially if "older" modelers want to sell to the younger modelers, is that the entire customer side of the process needs to be 100% web based - no writing checks, no find a stamp and envelope to mail it in, no "I need to print this out, or make some notes, so I can mail this in". It needs to be point at a web site, search, click to read about the product, click to buy, complete Paypal. Done. Wait for part to arrive.

A smart distributor may even start to stock the undecorated kits, in addition to the parts and decals.

Using a web site like Yahoo to host all the information, and then host a simple e-commerce site (Yahoo offers this as a service where they host your e-commerce site), may allow a younger, tech savvy person to set this up without a lot of work (one guy manages the HOYARDSALE site, and while he does not derive income from the sales (all are private transactions), he does police the site, and I think he has a large collection he is slowly selling off???)

Bottom line, this could be done, but likely by a spouse or child looking for a part-time job to make some extra money, and with the space to store a not-insignificant volume of parts (basement, spare bedroom, etc)

Probably the biggest unknown is whether the volume could reach 30 parts sold per day? Which means that Tom Madden and other like-minded modelers need to be casting an aggregate of 30 parts per day.

More importantly, could there be enough demand? Because "fine scale" modelers will need to be initiating 30 fine scale models per weekday to which these parts would be applied - that is about 7,500 undecorated kits per year. Does the hobby buy that many undecorated kits per year?

Would the STMFC members, on average, build 7-10 project cars per year around such parts?

One other thing to reduce the overhead to the pattern maker, and likely increase sales, would be to use a second the Yahoo group to collect and exchange information from those USING the part on how to use the part so others are more tempted to try it (risk reduction). Members of this list do this quite often, as well as groups like PRRPro.

In this manner, the customers are now contributing to the COOP - the more modelers building a car with the unique doors helped other modelers use the parts, then the higher the total sales volumes, the more successful the pattern maker, the more productive (and successful) the distributor, quite possibly more pattern makers will join in, and therefore the greater the diversity of available patterns/castings (Posts like "Oh yeah, this WP box car door could also be used on this SP box car, and if you search the group messages for subject "HO SP XM-xxx Glow" you will find the decals for it!")

If the group thinks this is possible, then perhaps a little informal survey could be conducted to assess the initial market size (5 new "fine scale" car starts per weekday, or 30?).

If this is viable, then one way to grow to at least the minimum sustainable market is to establish some clinics:

1) Deploy shake-and-take clinics at more RPM meets, and at NMRA regional conventions,

2) Invite casting material suppliers (or guys who sell DVD's on how to cast) to present pattern/casting clinics, and, once underway,

3) conduct a clinic on how the COOP works (e.g. how much time will it take to do all of the "Overhead" work (non-pattern/casting work), what are typical revenue levels (will the caster at least break even on materials, and maybe even pay for the undec kit used as starting point), etc.

Thoughts?

Dave Evans


Re: CB&Q caboose trucks

Brian Paul Ehni <behni@...>
 

Those are shown on his details page as no longer available. 8^(

--
Thanks!

Brian Paul Ehni

From: Dave Lotz <Dave_Lotz@bellsouth.net>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Fri, 6 Jan 2012 20:00:33 -0500
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: RE: [STMFC] CB&Q caboose trucks






Hi Jerry,

I know that Q Connection has purchased a quantity of the Athearn trucks and
will sell them to you. Contact Q Connection at Tom@QConnection.biz
<mailto:Tom%40QConnection.biz>
<mailto:Tom@QConnection.biz <mailto:Tom%40QConnection.biz> > for details.

Dave Lotz


Re: [SPAM] La Salle & Bureau County Railroad

Scott Pitzer
 

On Jan 6, 2012, at 11:00 AM, "billsoman" <billso@gnventures.net> wrote:

Clearly any sizable steam-era layout should devote at least 0.0000001% of their fleet to LS&BC boxcars.

More if modeling a Midwestern road.

'-)

-------------------------
I'm going to freelance so I can have the zinc co. which owned the LSBC merge with Jones & Laughlin and I'll be able to use those cool tank cars as well!
And for operations past the era of this list, mid 70s, there'll be long strings of per-diem box cars lettered LBSC, painted pink and orange ( unless I change my mind again )
Scott Pitzer


Re: Woodland Scenics Burns!

Jack Burgess
 

Someone on another list posted the following:

Just noticed this update posted to the Atlas Forum:

"Dear all,

As you may have heard we have experienced a fire here at Woodland Scenics
and there is good news and bad news. The good news is that no one was hurt
during the fire or evacuation process. The bad news is that it took out a
couple of our manufacturing buildings. However, and fortunately, there is
more good news than bad.

We encompass multiple buildings that are spread out all over the town of
Linn Creek. We only lost two of those buildings and those two contained just
a small portion of our manufacturing facilities. Our shipping department,
warehouse and corporate offices were spared any damage, as were most of our
manufacturing buildings, so it is business as usual.

Thanks for all your concerns.

Respectfully,

Gale Cousins
Director of Sales & Customer Service
Woodland Scenics"


Re: old unidentified models album

drgwrail
 

The fellow who started Red Ball was a printer, which accounts for the huge variety of reefer sides, etc.
 
The castings were made on a Ludlow machine that was used to cast column headings and other large type faces that were beyond what Lionotype machines could handle. The type molds were open face brass ones for individual letters that were held in a clamp. The clamped line of type was then clamped to the Ludlow and molten type metal was injected under pressure.
 
When the line of type came out of the machine it had a metal strip about 1/8" thick on the back side so it could be inserted with a group of Linotype slugs. On the orginal Red Ball castings you could see where this stip had been sawed off.
 
When the Red Ball line was sold it likely included all the brass molds the orginator made plus his Ludlow machine.  Later owners may or may not used Lionotype metal since it is a very spacial alloy and not cheap. The metal instead of shrinking when it cooled it expanded slightly so as to make very sharp, clear type.  The Ludlow likely would have worked with any lead type alloy but maybe not as well.
 
I come from a family of printers and often saw my Dad doing work on the Ludlow at the newspaper.
 
The trucks did roll well. Probably because they wore in and seated along with the fact that the Linotype allow was somewhat similair to the Babbitt metal used in real steam loco and other machine bearings,
 
Chuck Yungkurth
Boulder CO
 
 
 
 
From: "john.allyn@comcast.net" <john.allyn@comcast.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, January 6, 2012 8:10 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: old unidentified models album


 


My conclusion too, though my recollection is that the sides on Red Ball kits of this sort were cast from linotype metal.  The truck line (which Jim notes is still available from Bitter Creek) was very extensive, particularly with respect to unusual types from the 1910 - 1940 period.  It would be interesting to see how these compare detail-wise with the prototypes and with present day offerings.  I do remember that they rolled exceptionally well.

John B. Allyn
----- Original Message -----
From: "JimK" <Prrfreak@aol.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, January 6, 2012 7:36:16 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: old unidentified models album

 

Scott

Looks like an old Red Ball N&W GK battleship gon.
I purchased one and built it in the 1970's along with several other RB kits.
Not bad kits for their day but rather crude by today's standards.
I think the sides were a metal foil glued to a wood backing. Many of the kits were like that but others had large castings.
RB had many types of oddball trucks, which I think became Cape Line and then Bitter Creek.

Jim Kehn

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: CB&Q caboose trucks

Dave Lotz
 

Hi Jerry,

I know that Q Connection has purchased a quantity of the Athearn trucks and
will sell them to you. Contact Q Connection at Tom@QConnection.biz
<mailto:Tom@QConnection.biz> for details.

Dave Lotz

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, January 05, 2012 5:56 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Digest Number 7177


CB&Q caboose trucks
<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/message/106135;_ylc=X3oDMTJzcHBudDZmBF9
TAzk3MzU5NzE1BGdycElkAzI1NTQ3NTMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MTY5NzI1BG1zZ0lkAzEwNjEzNQR
zZWMDZG1zZwRzbGsDdm1zZwRzdGltZQMxMzI1ODA0MTY4>


Posted by: "asychis@aol.com" asychis@aol.com
<mailto:asychis@aol.com?Subject=%20Re%3A%20CB%26Q%20caboose%20trucks>
asychis <http://profiles.yahoo.com/asychis>


Thu Jan 5, 2012 6:01 am (PST)



Hi All, Is there any source for CB&Q caboose trucks? I know there used
to be an MDC set that could be used, but from what I gather they are no
longer produced. I am building a AMB 40' Q caboose and the project is
definitely stalled without trucks. Also, if anyone has built this kit has
any tips
for the endrailings, I'd appreciate the information. This is a really
nice model, and I modified the kit to include Beardstown braces that were
common to these cabooses used in the Southern Illinois coal fields.

Jerry Michels


Re: Cocoa Beach Prototype Rails 2012

prr6380
 

Glad you guys are having good weather. 816 miles north in Central Ohio we were having to struggle with 57 degrees.

Walt Stafa

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "mike brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

Doug Harding says:

Weather report was for 32 in Orlando yesterday. Was 64 in Iowa today.
Perhaps so...but the 32 occurred at 5AM in Orlando...normally 5 or 6° cooler
in the winter than the beach. The high today [ Thursday ] was 67, it will be
72 on Friday and 75 on Sat. 76 on Sunday.

Mike Brock
Cocoa Beach unofficial weatherman


Re: Woodland Scenics Burns!

Rod Miller
 

A wholesaler that I buy from forwarded a message that they received
from WS. WS lost two of their many buildings. The end of the message
said: "Our shipping department, warehouse and corporate offices were
spared any damage, as were most of our manufacturing buildings, so it
is business as usual." I think "business as usual" is the key
statement.

Rod
--

Custom 2-rail O Scale Models: Drives, | O Scale West / S West
Repairs, Steam Loco Building, More | 2012 Meet is Feb 9-11
http://www.rodmiller.com | http://www.oscalewest.com


Re: La Salle & Bureau County Railroad

Tim O'Connor
 

Bill

You've exaggerated quite a bit. There were about 600,000 XM's in the
1950's, so 20 cars would be 1/30000, or .00333%. So the LS&BC box cars
would be more than 33,000 times more common than your estimate.

Tim O'Connor

Clearly any sizable steam-era layout should devote at least 0.0000001% of their fleet to LS&BC boxcars.
More if modeling a Midwestern road.
'-)


Re: Woodland Scenics Burns!

rwitt_2000
 

FWIW, their web site is still up, but with no information about the
fire. - Bob Witt


--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, asychis@... wrote:

Have y'all seen this? Jerry Michels

_http://www.ky3.http://wwhttp://wwhttp://www.ky3http://wwhttp://www.ky3h\;
ttp:
//wwhttp://wwwhttp://www.k_
(http://www.ky3.com/news/ky3-huge-fire-destroys-business-in-linn-creek-2\;
0120105,0,4228890.photogallery)



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: old unidentified models album

Clark Propst
 

I put the photo of the tank car I asked about it that photo section file. With the CCB meet in full swing might be awhile before it's approved.
Clark Propst


Re: [SPAM] La Salle & Bureau County Railroad

billsoman
 

Clearly any sizable steam-era layout should devote at least 0.0000001% of their fleet to LS&BC boxcars.

More if modeling a Midwestern road.

'-)

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Andy Cich" <ajc5150@...> wrote:

"My question is this: Does anyone out there have a photo of 1001 or 1002
that they could share with the Group?"


See page 44 of Kaminski's Pullman-Standard Freight Cars book for a builders
photo of LS&BC 1001.

The LS&BC car appears to be a carbon copy of the Rock Island 141000 Series
box cars. Sunshine offers this car in kit 37.1. So all you have to do is
come up with decals and you can model the LS&BC car.


Andy Cich


Re: NYC boxcar decals

tomedill@frontier.com
 

thanks to all for supplying info on NYC decals. Tom Dill
Tom Dill
tomedill@frontier.com


Re: old unidentified models album

john.allyn@...
 

My conclusion too, though my recollection is that the sides on Red Ball kits of this sort were cast from linotype metal.  The truck line (which Jim notes is still available from Bitter Creek) was very extensive, particularly with respect to unusual types from the 1910 - 1940 period.  It would be interesting to see how these compare detail-wise with the prototypes and with present day offerings.  I do remember that they rolled exceptionally well.



John B. Allyn

----- Original Message -----
From: "JimK" <Prrfreak@aol.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Friday, January 6, 2012 7:36:16 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: old unidentified models album

 




Scott

Looks like an old Red Ball N&W GK battleship gon.
I purchased one and built it in the 1970's along with several other RB kits.
Not bad kits for their day but rather crude by today's standards.
I think the sides were a metal foil glued to a wood backing. Many of the kits were like that but others had large castings.
RB had many types of oddball trucks, which I think became Cape Line and then Bitter Creek.

Jim Kehn




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: La Salle & Bureau County Railroad

Marcelo Lordeiro <mrcustom@...>
 

Hi Ray , you are right , thanks.

Marcelo


From: Ray Breyer
Sent: Thursday, January 05, 2012 9:38 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] La Salle & Bureau County Railroad



Hi Marcelo,

Copyright. I have NO idea where any of my LS&BC photos came from, and I don't wanna step on toes! None are good digital copies by any stretch, but you get the idea!


Regards,

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL

82821 - 82840 of 188733