Date   

Re: Sandblasting booth...

jerryglow2
 

To affirm the usefulness of a booth, I've been blasting cara and sub assemblies for years a I have a commercial booth from my days as a custom painter. It's great for evening out and cleaning up all sorts of imperfections. I recently did some ART cars with the little guards in the corners. Cleaning up after gluing was a simple matter as was cleaning end details. http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/modeling/ART_steel_reefers.html

Jerry Glow
http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/decals

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Jack Burgess" <jack@...> wrote:

Ted Culotta's Essential Freight Car articles convinced me that sandblasting
the metal parts of resin freight cars before painting would be a worthwhile
idea. Doing it outside in the wind worked but was messy so I finally built
my own sandblasting booth. At one time, there were some photos in the STMFC
files of one built by someone else on this list but by the time I decided to
build my own, they had apparently been deleted although I followed the same
basic idea. My booth was simple to build and cheap...an article on it is in
the new (February) issue of RMC for those interested...


Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com






Cocoa Beach Photos Posted

dh30973
 

Here are the pictures from this years meet.

http://www.pbase.com/dh30973/cocoa2012&page=all

Dave Hussey


What is the best way to represent the PS hydra-cushion underframe on a 40' PS-1

Ray Thibaut
 

Hi my name is Ray Thibaut (pronounced tea-bow)and I have been lurking on this list for some time. I have an InterMountain Railway Company PS-1 kit lettered for the P.R.R. as their number 47019. I understand from a little background reading that these cars were built with PS's Cushioned Underframe. Unfortunately that part is not included in this otherwise beautiful kit. Can this be represented with a part like Details West number 1009? Is their a better part available that I'm not aware of? I realize I'm pushing the Steam Era a little bit, but I hope you will forgive me. I know the Steam Era ended on the Pennsy in Nov.1957 and these cars were built in 2-54 according to the lettering on the kit. So they were only in the steam era for less than three years. You can see a photo of this car in P.R.R. Color Guide Vol. 2,page 50. There is an online photo at http://www.billspennsyphotos.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=129070039 but you have to register for free.
Thanks Ray T.


Sandblasting booth...

Jack Burgess
 

Ted Culotta's Essential Freight Car articles convinced me that sandblasting
the metal parts of resin freight cars before painting would be a worthwhile
idea. Doing it outside in the wind worked but was messy so I finally built
my own sandblasting booth. At one time, there were some photos in the STMFC
files of one built by someone else on this list but by the time I decided to
build my own, they had apparently been deleted although I followed the same
basic idea. My booth was simple to build and cheap...an article on it is in
the new (February) issue of RMC for those interested...


Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: Roping Staples/Towing Loops

arved_grass
 

Our list owner informed me that, in violation of the group rules, I've failed too sign my full name to my posts. I apologize for the oversight.

I am,

Arved G. Grass
Fleming Island, FL
(suburb of Jacksonville)


Re: Roping Staples/Towing Loops

arved_grass
 

Thanks Bruce.

I have recently joined the PRRPro yahoo group. Although I'm not a Pennsy modeler, I've finally given in to the fact that no matter what railroad one models, one must have some Pennsy models. They were just too common a foreign road car to ignore. And if I'm going to model them, I'm going to model them right!

I thought I was loosing my mind with these. I've known about their use on modern freight cars, but have only recently learned of their use on steam era freight cars. It made sense to me that they'd be on cars that would frequently have to be moved around manually, like hoppers and gondolas, esp. in the days before trackmobiles. :-)

But then I started seeing them on other cars, including steam era box cars. Tony Thompson pointed out the roping staples on the "Shake and Take" SP B-50-12-A, for instance.

I would have mentioned this on the PRRPro group, but I did a search for roping staples, towing loops, and many other terms I could think of to describe these and came up empty handed! OTOH, they've been discussed here on this forum fairly frequently, so I thought it best to bring up the topic here.

All the best,
- Arved
Modeling the Southern Pacific
From AC-4s to AC4400CWs

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

Arved,

A couple of issues,

First, regarding roping or towing staples. I would call them common, but not uniform. That said, the type of car matters and they were uncommon at best on PRR boxcars. Neither photo you reference appear to show them, which is good as I did not model them on my X31s. They were more common on cars such as hoppers. Additionally, the newer the car, or the rebuild of the car, the less likely I think you will be to find them. They may either extend out horizontally from or be placed vertically under the side sill near the bolster. Most typically (but not always) they appear to be a semicircular fitting of steel rod.

Second, for a detailed discussion of modeling the X31 and indeed the X31F underbody details, see the archives of the PRRPro yahoo group. Underbody drawings are posted to the FILES section of that group as well. You must join to see these, but heck, then you can post photos and comments on your progress there too!

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn AL (and PRRPro list owner)


On Jan 12, 2012, at 9:07 AM, Arved wrote:

I'm trying to educate myself about these details to improve my modelbuilding skills. I'm finding it difficult to find them on some photos, which in turn makes it more difficult to model them.

Reviewing some of the messages here, some cars only have them on one end on each side. Others?

Here's a "builders photo" of a PRR X31F (I've ordered a Bowser undec):

http://prr.railfan.net/freight/freightphotos.html?photo=BuildersPhotos/X31f_81538_B34_BillLane.jpg&fr=clX31

Since that will likely be chopped:
http://tinyurl.com/85cwzpw

There are many other photos, but I chose this due to the relative clarity of the underframe.

I don't see them/it. The roping staples that is.

I know I'm supposed to be looking for something near the bolster. That makes sense, as you need to transfer the towing loads. I've found that the AAR specification was that you could tow 6 cars up a 1% grade by the roping staple.

But photos of this, and of the PRR X26C (I brought home an F&C kit of this one) that I've found:

http://prr.railfan.net/freight/freightphotos.html?photo=BuildersPhotos/X26c_E15689_Side_BillLane.jpg&fr=clX26

(shorter version): http://tinyurl.com/78wvrha

cause me to question: were these a common or required feature of cars? Am I just plain blind? How or why should I model something I'm just not seeing?

Thanks,
- Arved




------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: MNRA Photo Collection viewable online

mike brock <brockm@...>
 

Bill Welch writes:

It looks like Steve Priest had a hand in this project. I would swear I saw him at Cocoa Beach.
That's because you did see him...he was here. He will be doing a clinic presentation next year.

Mike Brock


NP/NHIX 900 Series Reefer Underframe

Samuel Röthlisberger
 

Hello everybody

I'm in the process of assembling the Sunshine 50' NP reefer of the 900 Series. There is no explanation of the underframe. All pictures are from 40' PFE reefers. Can anybody help me out with a picture of the underframe?

Thanks you

Samuel Roethlisberger


New Member

Samuel Röthlisberger
 

Hello

I'm a new member and I thought it would be kind to tell you something about me.

My name is Samuel Roethlisberger and I live in Switzerland. I mainly model the Milwaukee Road's electrified Rocky Mountain Division from 1947 until 1974. I also model some NP steam and UP in the Turbine era.
I enjoy building cars from kits. I just started building resin kit with good results and I did some kitbashing too.

Have a beautiful day

Samuel Roethlisberger


MNRA Photo Collection viewable online

Bill Welch
 

Trying to refresh my memory of what freight car photos were archived at the NMRA's Kalmbach Library, I stumbled upon the fact that some are viewable online now, mainly the "Robert W. Charles Collection," several builders photos including numerous photos of the Alternate Standard 2-bay hopper, and slides of more modern subjects. Not included are the Dusty Miller and Ernest Stefan collections, for which I am trying to get a list.

Here is a link to the photo pages: http://archive.nmra.org/Photographs.aspx?c=118

It looks like Steve Priest had a hand in this project. I would swear I saw him at Cocoa Beach. I first viewed the RWC collection in 1996 when I went to the library to do some research and in just a cursory look again this morning my now more educated eye saw several treasures I missed many years ago and not in the book Larry and Ted did.

It is a great time to be doing research and modeling!

Enjoy

Bill Welch


Re: Roping Staples/Towing Loops

Bruce Smith
 

Arved,

A couple of issues,

First, regarding roping or towing staples. I would call them common, but not uniform. That said, the type of car matters and they were uncommon at best on PRR boxcars. Neither photo you reference appear to show them, which is good as I did not model them on my X31s. They were more common on cars such as hoppers. Additionally, the newer the car, or the rebuild of the car, the less likely I think you will be to find them. They may either extend out horizontally from or be placed vertically under the side sill near the bolster. Most typically (but not always) they appear to be a semicircular fitting of steel rod.

Second, for a detailed discussion of modeling the X31 and indeed the X31F underbody details, see the archives of the PRRPro yahoo group. Underbody drawings are posted to the FILES section of that group as well. You must join to see these, but heck, then you can post photos and comments on your progress there too!

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn AL (and PRRPro list owner)

On Jan 12, 2012, at 9:07 AM, Arved wrote:

I'm trying to educate myself about these details to improve my modelbuilding skills. I'm finding it difficult to find them on some photos, which in turn makes it more difficult to model them.

Reviewing some of the messages here, some cars only have them on one end on each side. Others?

Here's a "builders photo" of a PRR X31F (I've ordered a Bowser undec):

http://prr.railfan.net/freight/freightphotos.html?photo=BuildersPhotos/X31f_81538_B34_BillLane.jpg&fr=clX31

Since that will likely be chopped:
http://tinyurl.com/85cwzpw

There are many other photos, but I chose this due to the relative clarity of the underframe.

I don't see them/it. The roping staples that is.

I know I'm supposed to be looking for something near the bolster. That makes sense, as you need to transfer the towing loads. I've found that the AAR specification was that you could tow 6 cars up a 1% grade by the roping staple.

But photos of this, and of the PRR X26C (I brought home an F&C kit of this one) that I've found:

http://prr.railfan.net/freight/freightphotos.html?photo=BuildersPhotos/X26c_E15689_Side_BillLane.jpg&fr=clX26

(shorter version): http://tinyurl.com/78wvrha

cause me to question: were these a common or required feature of cars? Am I just plain blind? How or why should I model something I'm just not seeing?

Thanks,
- Arved




------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Roping Staples/Towing Loops

arved_grass
 

I'm trying to educate myself about these details to improve my modelbuilding skills. I'm finding it difficult to find them on some photos, which in turn makes it more difficult to model them.

Reviewing some of the messages here, some cars only have them on one end on each side. Others?

Here's a "builders photo" of a PRR X31F (I've ordered a Bowser undec):

http://prr.railfan.net/freight/freightphotos.html?photo=BuildersPhotos/X31f_81538_B34_BillLane.jpg&fr=clX31

Since that will likely be chopped:
http://tinyurl.com/85cwzpw

There are many other photos, but I chose this due to the relative clarity of the underframe.

I don't see them/it. The roping staples that is.

I know I'm supposed to be looking for something near the bolster. That makes sense, as you need to transfer the towing loads. I've found that the AAR specification was that you could tow 6 cars up a 1% grade by the roping staple.

But photos of this, and of the PRR X26C (I brought home an F&C kit of this one) that I've found:

http://prr.railfan.net/freight/freightphotos.html?photo=BuildersPhotos/X26c_E15689_Side_BillLane.jpg&fr=clX26

(shorter version): http://tinyurl.com/78wvrha

cause me to question: were these a common or required feature of cars? Am I just plain blind? How or why should I model something I'm just not seeing?

Thanks,
- Arved


Re: Cocoa Beach Prototype Rails - Small scale manufacturing

Monk Alan <Alan.Monk@...>
 

Some thoughts on the UK experience:

I know maybe a dozen UK modellers who produce small-run detail parts for locos, coaching stock, freight stock and infrastructure/scenery, indeed I've produced masters for 2 resin cast parts myself, with a friend more experienced in resin casting doing the actual production. These range from cast resin parts, cast whitemetal parts, etched brass/nickel-silver/stainless parts, decals and (just appearing) rapid-prototyping parts. One or two guys have also produced larger items - complete wagon or coach bodies and fittings. Some of the masters will be modified proprietry items, so there's an issue with copywrite, etc., which means commercial production might not be a good idea!

In most cases, the parts were required by the modeller for a personal project of theirs, but then made available to anyone else who wanted them. For the most part, news of the parts was 'advertised' solely by word of mouth and/or, in some cases, on egroups and internet forii. Our extensive exhibition circuit also means most UK modellers meet up at least monthly and word gets around that 'so-and-so has a new resin part available' or one might see a product used in a modelling demonstration and get the 'who, where and how much' details from the demonstrator.

One or two of our scale or interest societies act as an informal clearing house, but only to spread the word, not the product itself. In every case that I'm aware of, the production and distribution of the parts are handled by each individual producer. None of them are interested in making a living from their products (the UK market is even smaller and arguably more splintered than yours!) but rather are happy to help other modellers out. Most charge only for the cost of materials, some to cover some of their production/distribution time costs too. Some might consider commission work, but only if it's a item that interests them and doesn't impinge on their own hobby time to any great extent.

________________________________________
Alan Monk
London, UK

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Re: Prototype Rails 2012 Report

np328
 

I would like to add to the people who thank Jeff and Mike (and the crew at the registration desks) who put this on each year.
There has always been a good group of presenters and getting to talk with the people who design and manufacture the products is great.
The food in the area has always been wonderful and the multiple times I was at Roberto's, the owner was always on site in the kitchen, which to me says a lot about why it is so good.

Of the presentations: I hesitate to name people because all are top notch however Roger Hinman's video of an MDT car being assembled was a true gem.

One bit of advice and this might apply to anyone who will be putting on a convention in the next year: Could the font on name tags be no less than 36 point and the rest (location of home city/state) be no less than 24. We are all getting older and as I see some of these folks only once a year, it helps to be able to read their names.

Again Mike, Jeff, reg crew, thank you from both myself and my wife. Jim Dick - not quite yet home at Roseville, MN.


Re: Small scale manufacturing

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Charles R Yungkurth <drgwrail@...> wrote:

Not to mention that Solid Works is a  CAD program that costs about $5000 plus a license fee of about $100 a year.  
 
Chuck Yungkurth 
Boulder CO

Some people have been using Google Sketchup, which is free, with I believe reasonable results. I took a quick look at it, and it seems to do what is needed, but I'm not into learning new software just for fun, so didn't take it any further.

My view is that resolution is going to be the problem for some time to come. Do a little reading on Reynolds Numbers and consider the implications.

Dennis


Re: Small scale manufacturing

drgwrail
 

Not to mention that Solid Works is a  CAD program that costs about $5000 plus a license fee of about $100 a year.  
 
Chuck Yungkurth 
Boulder CO

From: Bill Lane <bill@lanestrains.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, January 11, 2012 6:39 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Small scale manufacturing


 
All,

I was just checking in here when I saw this topic which was tied to "you are
going to be able to make it all yourself soon". Even if a suitable 3D
printer became affordable (you would have to define affordable on an
individual basis) you would need to be able to do the designing in some
CAD/Solidworks program which has a **massive** learning curve. I would call
myself an advanced beginner in Solidworks.

None of the current bells and whistles "isn't that neat" RP materials
produce detail and smooth enough surfaces in a **single print** on ALL
planes that are going to be acceptable for model railroad applications. You
have to pick the most shown face and go with that for the best detail. If
other faces are important that has to be a separate 3D produced part that is
assembled to became your master pattern. Rounded or angled items can have
stepping issues. You would think that .002 thick layers are not noticeable
until you try & make an air tank!

Sorry but I don't see this changing drastically in the next few years. Since
making my own parts for the past 5 years the advancement has been to take
.0005 off of the layering. That is it. And that resolution comes at a
premium price to get an item produced.

I have found a rather awesome urethane caster. It is his full time gig. Even
if I knew him on a personal level I just could not see me asking him to show
me or anyone else how to cast urethane. I am not even interested in
learning. I enjoy the designing the most.

The only way I could see the co-op idea as being viable is if your current
plastic car manufacturers share their parts designs as freeware. For any
individual to have to design any item to give it to the co-op is probably
not going to happen on any large scale.

Thank You,
Bill Lane

Modeling the Mighty Pennsy & PRSL in 1957 in S Scale since 1988

See my finished models at:
<http://www.lanestrains.com/> http://www.lanestrains.com
Look at what has been made in PRR in S Scale!

Custom Train Parts Design
<http://www.lanestrains.com/SolidWorks_Modeling.htm>
http://www.lanestrains.com/SolidWorks_Modeling.htm

PRR Builders Photos Bought, Sold & Traded
(Trading is MUCH preferred)
<http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRphotos.xls>
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRphotos.xls

***Join the PRR T&HS***
The other members are not ALL like me!
<http://www.prrths.com/> http://www.prrths.com
<http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRTHS_Application.pdf>
http://www.lanestrains.com/PRRTHS_Application.pdf

Join the Pennsylvania Reading Seashore Lines Historical Society
It's FREE to join! <http://www.prslhs.com/> http://www.prslhs.com
Preserving The Memory Of The PRSL

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: NYC Boxcars -- which ends do I need?

Aley, Jeff A
 

Richard,

Thanks! I will read your article on-line tonight.

Regards,

-Jeff


From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Richard Hendrickson
Sent: Wednesday, January 11, 2012 6:09 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] NYC Boxcars -- which ends do I need?



On Jan 11, 2012, at 5:30 PM, Aley, Jeff A wrote:

Folks,

Suppose I want 6 of the NYC steel boxcars modeled by BLI. For 1951
- 53, how many should be 7/8 ends and how many should be Dreadnaught?

I suspect the answer to my question is in RPCyc21, which I do not
yet have.
That information is also in the roster in my March, 2007 Railmodel
Journal article on these cars. The only Spec. 486 box cars that had
Dreadnaught ends were those built in 1927: 1,000 cars for the Big
Four (later absorbed into the NYC roster), 50 cars for the Peoria &
Eastern, and 1,000 cars for the NYC itself. So that's 2,050 cars out
of almost 21,000, approximately one in ten. All the other cars had
7-8 corrugated ends.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: NYC Boxcars -- which ends do I need?

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jan 11, 2012, at 5:30 PM, Aley, Jeff A wrote:

Folks,

Suppose I want 6 of the NYC steel boxcars modeled by BLI. For 1951
- 53, how many should be 7/8 ends and how many should be Dreadnaught?

I suspect the answer to my question is in RPCyc21, which I do not
yet have.
That information is also in the roster in my March, 2007 Railmodel
Journal article on these cars. The only Spec. 486 box cars that had
Dreadnaught ends were those built in 1927: 1,000 cars for the Big
Four (later absorbed into the NYC roster), 50 cars for the Peoria &
Eastern, and 1,000 cars for the NYC itself. So that's 2,050 cars out
of almost 21,000, approximately one in ten. All the other cars had
7-8 corrugated ends.


Richard Hendrickson


Re: NYC Boxcars -- which ends do I need?

Aley, Jeff A
 

Aaron,

Thanks! I'm sure I have that issue of RMC; I just need to find it.

Regards,

-Jeff


From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Aaron Gjermundson
Sent: Wednesday, January 11, 2012 5:43 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Re: NYC Boxcars -- which ends do I need?



In the October, 2006, MRC, Essential Freight Car article #34, NYC USRA design box cars, there is a table that lists all of the cars, and their similarities/differences.

Aaron


Re: NYC Boxcars -- which ends do I need?

npin53
 

In the October, 2006, MRC, Essential Freight Car article #34, NYC USRA design box cars, there is a table that lists all of the cars, and their similarities/differences.

Aaron

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