Date   

Re: Walthers Troop Sleeper

derrell
 

I'd like to add to the comments here;

First of all I've found that original flavored Pinesol removes paint from plastic quite well. Once the paint is loosened use a stiff bristle brush to whisk as much of it off the model as you can submersed in the Pinesol because it seems to smear back onto the model once the Pinesol is washed way under warm water. Then I put the parts in my ultra sonic cleaner filled with Windex (again original flavor). While plastic doesn't clean up in an Ultrasonic cleaner quite as well as metal it does help remove loose particles. Finally rinse everything in warm water (soapy is optional). This is a long-term job, which can take a few days to complete.

Naturally test your plastic in the Pinesol and Windex first! I've stripped Athearn and Life-Like in this manner.

As a professional painter I'd like to debunk a bit of the mythology about Air Honing (sand blasting) plastic; we seem to have this kid glove mentality about it. I Air Honed 4 plastic diesel shells yesterday (right along with a couple of brass pieces) in my Harbor Freight blasting cabinet. I used 220 grit silicon at between 80 and 140 psi (depending on how far down the air use pulled it)! The shells came out clean with NO damage to any of the plastic or detail. I think we either don't understand or we forget that silicon cuts rather than beats and the harder the surface the better it cuts (up to a point, of course). The softer a material is (again up to a point) the more the particles tend to bounce rather than cut.

You are all quite welcome to continue to use messy, ineffective, and long term baking soda if you wish but I tell you from hard experience that it is a waste of time when the silicon at a rather high pressure works great. Again I have not air honed every type of plastic so I would encourage you to test it first - but I say that more as a disclaimer. Athearn and Proto-2000 I've found to be quite safe!

As far as removing lettering I think the tool Jack Burgess mentions in his RMC article would be perfect with the silicon for this. Or the Paache Air Eraser. But if you use the baking soda prepare to be there "alllllllll daaaaaaay long"! Grrrrr.

Derrell

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@...> wrote:

Paul,
You might want to try Scalecoat paint remover.
I've used it to remove factory lettering on a finished locomotive. It worked quite well for me. Didn't really have any effect on the paint job. I used cotton swaps to apply the solution and just rubbed for a bit.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Bernice" <chris_hillman@> wrote:

I wanted to get a Walthers undec Troop Sleeper but couldn't find one, so I wound up with a blue B&O version, #932-4169.

I want to paint it for the C&EI, in their blue with orange striping.

The questions is; how to remove the lettering without affecting the overall blue paint scheme.

What solvent will remove only the lettering? Or, will the whole car have to be paint-removed?

Thanks,

Paul Hillman


Re: SP hog fuel car

Kent Sullivan
 

Jim, good point. The misunderstanding of the name must be pretty widespread (or was widespread)... The NP train sheet analysis I did for several months in 1953-7 for the Tacoma Division North Branches made multiple references to cars loaded with this material (often in a derailment!), and it was always "hog fuel". No dictionary for the dispatchers to consult for that one, I guess!

--Kent

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Sabol" <jimsabol@...> wrote:

My point exactly. People, even in the industry call the rig a hog
machine because they don't hear the "ed". Calling the hogged fuel
hog fuel even on the SP doesn't make hogged fuel hog fuel any more
than hardware store employees calling duct tape duck tape makes duct
tape duck tape. Jim here.


Re: SP hog fuel car

Tim O'Connor
 

Tony, I'm sure I've seen official SP documents somewhere that used
the term hog fuel, but I just looked up SP 52490, a rebuilt A-50-6
(de-roofed with added small side-doors) and it is listed in the 1955
ORER simply as a "wood chip" car. I have a 1956 photo of 52490 and
it's loaded with can only be hogged fuel -- shredded bits of wood.
It looks like the stuff people put around their trees and flower beds.

I also have a 1957 shot of MILW 273221, a rebuilt 50 foot single sheathed
box car. This one has a roof with numerous hatches, no main doors, and
a line of dump doors along the bottom of the sides. MILW had hundreds
of these puppies in 1959!! They are also listed as "wood chip" cars.

Sigh. I wish Martin and Al had been more interested in the 1950's to
early 60's. So MANY interesting rebuilds back then!

Tim O'Connor



No argument with this as far as it goes, but wood chipper
machines for decades in sawmills have been called "hogs" and their
product "hog fuel." They are by means restricted to bark, and the
cargo carried in SP "hog fuel" cars was certainly not all bark. This
goes back to the days that much hog fuel was burned in conical
structures at sawmills when it could not be sold.
Tony Thompson


Re: Bettendorf underframe

John Riddell <jriddell@...>
 

Indeed, as of January 1914 there were 81,507 Bettendorf underframes in service in freight cars of many railroads including:



Armour

Arizona Eastern

CB&Q

CM&StP

CRI&P

CStPM&O

Central of Georgia

CI&S

Colorado & Southern

Central Pacific

C&A

Copper Range

C&NW

D&H

DNW&P

Erie

Georgia

Grand Trunk

GH&SA

H&TC

HE&WT

Illinois Central

Kansas City Southern

L&N

MDT

Michigan Central

ML&T

MStP&SSM

NYC&HR

LS&MS

North Coast

NW Pacific

Nevada Northern

OWRR&NCo

QSL

Oregon & California

Pacific Electric

PFE

Rutland

Southern

SP

SPLA&SL

St.J&GI

Tremont&G

T&NO

UP

Vandalia

Wash. I&M

Union Tank Line



More were built after 1914.

John Riddell


Re: Walthers Troop Sleeper

Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Paul,
You might want to try Scalecoat paint remover.
I've used it to remove factory lettering on a finished locomotive. It worked quite well for me. Didn't really have any effect on the paint job. I used cotton swaps to apply the solution and just rubbed for a bit.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Bernice" <chris_hillman@...> wrote:

I wanted to get a Walthers undec Troop Sleeper but couldn't find one, so I wound up with a blue B&O version, #932-4169.

I want to paint it for the C&EI, in their blue with orange striping.

The questions is; how to remove the lettering without affecting the overall blue paint scheme.

What solvent will remove only the lettering? Or, will the whole car have to be paint-removed?

Thanks,

Paul Hillman


Rivarossi PS-1 (was re: Steam freight cars website)

Tim O'Connor
 

Ashley

I think the Riv model was a post-1950 PS-1 with an 8' door; definitely
not a model of the New Haven pre-1950 PS-1's with 7' doors. Moreover I
have never seen a photo of a New Haven PS-1 in the snazzy black McGinnis
paint scheme. Some did get McGinnis era repaints but they were painted
in an oxide color overall. Still, New Haven had a large fleet of PS-1's
so Rivarossi wasn't totally off base.

Tim O'Connor


Speaking of freight cars, one of the very first box cars i ever owned
was a Rivarossi New Haven model in black with the white and orange
lettering.
Of course this is likely to be totally bogus, or at best a stand in, but
I was just a teenager and it was my first foray into American modelling,
and it looked pretty.
Ashley Pollard


Re: Steam Era Freight Cars web site is on-line again at new URL

Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

Rob,
 
Many thanks for taking the site back to operational status.
I, for one, appreciate your efforts.
 
Fred Freitas
 


________________________________
From: Rob Adams <steamera@netins.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, January 21, 2012 8:57 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Steam Era Freight Cars web site is on-line again at new URL


 
All;

I have the Steam Era Freight Cars web site up and running again at
http://www.SteamEraFreightCars.com

Please note that this URL differs slightly (the word "era" has been
added) from the original address, which is still dead.

Please contact me off-line with questions or material to contribute.
Thanks.

Best regards,

Rob Adams
Wellman, IA

On 1/20/12 9:37 AM, Bill Schneider wrote:

Looks like the domain has expired. Sad to see this resource go away..

Bill Schneider

From: cepropst@q.com <mailto:cepropst%40q.com>
Sent: Friday, January 20, 2012 10:34 AM
To: STMFC
Subject: [STMFC] Steam freight cars website

I just tried to look at something on the (originally Ted Culotta’s )
website and things have changed. Is it just me seeing the new
{useless) format?
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Walthers Troop Sleeper

hacketet <hacketet@...>
 

The only way I've heard of that will remove only the lettering is to abrade it with baking soda and a Q-tip moistened in alcohol. In my opoinion, this is very tedious practice, but for a single car it may be OK. I usually do a bunch of cars at once so I've never tried it.

As for using a stripper, it all depends on what paint was used. The base color was spray painted, the lettering is applied with pad printing ink - basically a rubber stamp. They usually respond differently to different strippers, but there is no way to predict which will go first. Even if the lettering does come off first there is a good chance that the paint will be unacceptably damaged. It's better to remove everything and start over.

Here are some strippers that have been discussed in other lists:

Isopropanol (75% to 97% depending on personal preferance)
Brake fluid (no mention of the brands)
Chamelion (a propritary paint stripper)
10% sodium hydroxide (the only thing that works on old Athern models)

Unless someone has stripped this particular model, which would work best is just a guess.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Bernice" <chris_hillman@...> wrote:

The questions is; how to remove the lettering without affecting the overall blue paint scheme.

What solvent will remove only the lettering? Or, will the whole car have to be paint-removed?

Thanks,

Paul Hillman


Re: Steam freight cars website

Don <riverman_vt@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

My 2 cents:

The whole concept of a "central repository" of information flies in
the face of the "web" -- Ted put together a nice site that contained
some good information about some prototype freight cars, and models > of freight cars, and that was a good thing. I'd like to see that
resource maintained and enhanced.

But the idea of folding other sites into it doesn't make any sense
to me at all. I joined MANY Yahoo interest groups (without daily
email) just to be able to take advantage of the resources in their
FILE and PHOTO archives. Yahoo doesn't permit Google web-bots to
crawl through the groups (What a bonanza that would be for us, but
probably a huge loss to Yahoo!). But you can subscribe to a single
daily email from Yahoo that will provide links and thumbnails for
any new files, photos, and attachments sent to ANY of the groups
you belong to. I find this email helps me immensely by eliminating
the need for me to crawl through the 75 or so groups I belong to,
to search for new stuff.

There are THOUSANDS of valuable railroad web sites. Let Google (or
Bing, or whomever) be your librarian! Become a searchologist!

One has to agree with you here, Tim. I have tried to limit the number of groups "subscribed" to but one can always join one for a sort time as needed. Like you, I also utilize the single daily email
that Yahoo offers as their "Yahoo Groups Update" and find it saves a lot of time. When folks are limited in time it is the only way to go!

See you next weekend????

Cordially, Don Valentine


Steam freight cars website

Ashley Pollard <ashley@...>
 

On 21/01/2012 15:52, Peter Ness wrote:

That's great Ashley. About 30 years ago a hobby magazine I won't
name featured an article on the layout of a prodigious New Haven
modeler who is focused firmly in the Steam Era in the late '40's. To
the title of the article, the magazine attached the post-script; "A
Seldom Modeled Railroad". The one sentence fragment alone may have
inspired and motivated many semi-interested New Haven Modelers to
bigger and better things in their individual efforts. It was of
course, back in unenlightened times when parts of the hobby press did
not recognize that some modelers understood that when modeling a
prototype there was such a thing as interchange, and New Haven
freight equipment stood as good a chance as ending up on the rails of
another railroad...I'm pleased to say today this seldom modeled
railroad has avid contributors in the US, Canada and UK.
Speaking of freight cars, one of the very first box cars i ever owned was a Rivarossi New Haven model in black with the white and orange lettering.

Of course this is likely to be totally bogus, or at best a stand in, but I was just a teenager and it was my first foray into American modelling, and it looked pretty.

Now that I know a bit more about when the schemes were introduced I will run a black McGinnis NH box car on my new layout at some future point.

--
Ashley Pollard
Ashley@apnix.demon.co.uk

---------------------------------------

http://no-two-alike.blogspot.com/


Re: SP hog fuel car

Greg Martin
 

hogged fuel


_McGraw-Hill Science & Technology Dictionary:_
(http://www.answers.com/library/Sci%2DTech%20Dictionary-cid-10331700)
hogged fuel



_Home_ (http://www.answers.com/) > _Library_
(http://www.answers.com/main/what_content.jsp) > _Science_ (http://www.answers.com/main/science.jsp) >
_Sci-Tech Dictionary_
(http://www.answers.com/library/Sci%2DTech+Dictionary-cid-10331700)

(′hägd ¦fyül)
(materials) Sawmill refuse that has been fed through a disintegrator, or
hog, by which the various sizes and forms are reduced to a practically
uniform size of chips or shreds.




Terms like this over the years seem to get corrupted and Hog Fuel is one
case where the term certainly falls into this category. I have heard it both
ways and I try to use only the term Hogged fuel, but try not to correct
anyone that uses hog fuel, its not worth the explanation.

The hoggings are often screened for size in modern mills as they size of
chip from dust to fuel are separated for complete different resources. There
is not much as paper mill can do with fuel or dust.

BTW a "hog" is a hammer mill, and you'll often see the "hogged" (non bark
material) leave a hog or a hammer mill to be run through a "clipper" where
the material is hammered or hogged again, hopefully even enough in size to
make a salable chip to a paper mill, dust is not what a paper mill is after.


A similar term that is terribly corrupted is the term Verge Rafter,
corrupted to Varge Raft and Barge Rafter often in today's construction
terminology.

In Southern California in today's construction world you can have new
sheeting put on your roof even though you might have ask to have new SHEATHING
put on your roof.

All corrupted terms.

Greg Martin

Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean

In a message dated 1/21/2012 11:43:35 P.M. Pacific Standard Time,
jimsabol@msn.com writes:




My point exactly. People, even in the industry call the rig a hog machine
because they don’t hear the ‘ed.’ Calling the hogged fuel hog fuel even on
the SP doesn’t make hogged fuel hog fuel any more than hardware store
employees calling duct tape duck tape makes duct tape duck tape. Jim here.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: SP hog fuel car

Jim Sabol
 

My point exactly. People, even in the industry call the rig a hog machine because they don’t hear the ‘ed.’ Calling the hogged fuel hog fuel even on the SP doesn’t make hogged fuel hog fuel any more than hardware store employees calling duct tape duck tape makes duct tape duck tape. Jim here.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: SP hog fuel car

spsalso
 

From an on-line dictionary:

"To shred (waste wood, for example) by machine."

I'll modify that by noting that I do some work at a factory that has machines that are referred to as "hoggers". They turn square wood into largish dowels (about 1 1/2"). The purpose of these machines is not to shred (as implied by the definition), but they do shred as they work. I have heard the term most of my working life, and it means to quickly remove mass quantities. It applies to both wood and metal (and more, I suppose).


Ed

Edward Sutorik


Walthers Troop Sleeper

Paul Hillman
 

I wanted to get a Walthers undec Troop Sleeper but couldn't find one, so I wound up with a blue B&O version, #932-4169.

I want to paint it for the C&EI, in their blue with orange striping.

The questions is; how to remove the lettering without affecting the overall blue paint scheme.

What solvent will remove only the lettering? Or, will the whole car have to be paint-removed?

Thanks,

Paul Hillman


Re: SP hog fuel car

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Jim Sabol wrote:
This is a small thing but since most people on this list are careful
about accuracy (I was going to say “fanatic”), the completely
correct term is “hogged fuel.” At a sawmill much undesirable bark
is removed from the log prior to sawing and is either blasted off by
powerful jets of water on the jackslip or is bumped and scraped off
by a machine called a hogger or hogging machine. The resultant
scraps of bark, useful for fuel or footing, thus are hogged fuel.
It’s somewhat like duct tape. Lots of people don’t hear the the ‘t’ in that word, and lots of people don’t hear the ‘ed’ in hogged
fuel. Then there’s the difference between ‘complimentary’ and
‘complementary’ in forty years of the otherwise brilliant Railroad
Model Craftsman articles. Jim here.
No argument with this as far as it goes, but wood chipper
machines for decades in sawmills have been called "hogs" and their
product "hog fuel." They are by means restricted to bark, and the
cargo carried in SP "hog fuel" cars was certainly not all bark. This
goes back to the days that much hog fuel was burned in conical structures at sawmills when it could not be sold.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Steam Era Freight Cars web site is on-line again at new URL

Dennis Williams
 

Rob.   Are you going to run it the way it was intended to???  I can start sending photos when you are ready!!!!    Dennis Williams



________________________________
From: Rob Adams <steamera@netins.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, January 21, 2012 8:57 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Steam Era Freight Cars web site is on-line again at new URL



 

All;

I have the Steam Era Freight Cars web site up and running again at
http://www.SteamEraFreightCars.com

Please note that this URL differs slightly (the word "era" has been
added) from the original address, which is still dead.

Please contact me off-line with questions or material to contribute.
Thanks.

Best regards,

Rob Adams
Wellman, IA

On 1/20/12 9:37 AM, Bill Schneider wrote:

Looks like the domain has expired. Sad to see this resource go away..

Bill Schneider

From: cepropst@q.com <mailto:cepropst%40q.com>
Sent: Friday, January 20, 2012 10:34 AM
To: STMFC
Subject: [STMFC] Steam freight cars website

I just tried to look at something on the (originally Ted Culotta’s )
website and things have changed. Is it just me seeing the new
{useless) format?
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Bowser PRR 2D-F8 trucks

SUVCWORR@...
 

The H30 rode on a multitude of trucks:

2E-F2 Bowser Crown
2E-F2a different spring package
2E-F10 dbl truss
2E-F11 National
2E-F12 Young
2E-F13 dbl truss
2E-F14 National
2E-F15 Young
2E-F22 ASF A-3
2E-F22a ASF A-3

The difference between the classes of the same type are one or more of spring packages, brakes and bolster.

The H30a all rode on 2E-F22a ASF A-3 70 ton trucks.

The Tangent ASF A-3 truck should be close as the G31b rode on a variation of this truck.

So you have two options for the H30 the Bowser Crown truck or the Tangent ASF A-3 Note the National referred to in these classes is not the same as the National B-1 which was PRR truck class 2E-F23 nor the National C-1 which was2E-F25/b/c.

For the H30a the Tangent ASF A-3 should work

Rich Orr

-----Original Message-----
From: Robert Bogie <robertb@smartchat.net.au>
To: STMFC <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sat, Jan 21, 2012 5:47 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Bowser PRR 2D-F8 trucks


Rich,

Is there a truck available to be used under the H-30/H-30a class covered
hoppers.

Regards,

Robert Bogie
----- Original Message -----
From: SUVCWORR@aol.com
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, January 21, 2012 3:19 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Bowser PRR 2D-F8 trucks




The PRR "Crown" truck used on the Bowser H22 is part 74091 and truck class
2D-F2 (50 ton) and on the H21a 2E-F2 and 2E-F2a (70 ton truck thus the journal
size E).

The 2D-F8 is a 50 ton truck. Bowser part 74277, Red Caboose part 5009, Kadee
part 517 and Sunshine part TM7. This truck was used under some H22 but no H21
cars. These trucks were used under FM, GLa, GLb, GLc, GLe, GLf, GLg, GP, GPa,
GR, GRa, GS, GSa, GSc, GSd, H22, K7, K8, U6, XL, XLa, XLc, X23, X23a, X23b, X24,
X25, X25a, X25b, X25c, X25d, X28a, X29, X29a, X30 class cars.

The ASF-3 50 ton truck was PRR classes 2D-F25, 2D-F26, 2D-F26a. These were
used under X38, X40, X40a, X40b, X41, X41a and X41b class cars.

The ASF-3 70 ton truck was PRR classes 2E-F22, 2E-F22a, 2E-F22b and 2E-F22f

Rich Orr








------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Steam Era Freight Cars web site is on-line again at new URL

Rob Adams
 

All;

I have the Steam Era Freight Cars web site up and running again at
http://www.SteamEraFreightCars.com

Please note that this URL differs slightly (the word "era" has been
added) from the original address, which is still dead.

Please contact me off-line with questions or material to contribute.
Thanks.

Best regards,

Rob Adams
Wellman, IA

On 1/20/12 9:37 AM, Bill Schneider wrote:

Looks like the domain has expired. Sad to see this resource go away..

Bill Schneider

From: cepropst@q.com <mailto:cepropst%40q.com>
Sent: Friday, January 20, 2012 10:34 AM
To: STMFC
Subject: [STMFC] Steam freight cars website

I just tried to look at something on the (originally Ted Culotta’s )
website and things have changed. Is it just me seeing the new
{useless) format?
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Model Railroading 11/87

Steve SANDIFER
 

I am interested in securing a copy of Model Railroading, Nov. 1987. I have not found one available on the web. If any of you know of a source please advise.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@sbcglobal.net
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417


Re: Bowser PRR 2D-F8 trucks

robertb@smartchat.net.au
 

Sorry, I forgot the scale. It is in HO. I want to replace the trucks on a couple of Oriental H-30 models.

Regards,

Robert Bogie

----- Original Message -----
From: Bruce F. Smith
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, January 22, 2012 11:24 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Bowser PRR 2D-F8 trucks



Robert,

Scale?

The H30 and H30A used a variety of trucks including the 2E-F2 "Crown".
See
http://prr.railfan.net/freight/classpage.html?class=H30
for numbers corresponding to various trucks. You can certainly use the
Bowser "Crown" for some H30 and H30A models. Other 70 ton truck styles
are less commonly available, but I think there might be one or two that
would also work.

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

>>> "Robert Bogie" <robertb@smartchat.net.au> 01/21/12 4:47 PM >>>
Rich,

Is there a truck available to be used under the H-30/H-30a class covered
hoppers.

Regards,

Robert Bogie
----- Original Message -----
From: SUVCWORR@aol.com
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Saturday, January 21, 2012 3:19 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Bowser PRR 2D-F8 trucks

The PRR "Crown" truck used on the Bowser H22 is part 74091 and truck
class 2D-F2 (50 ton) and on the H21a 2E-F2 and 2E-F2a (70 ton truck thus
the journal size E).

The 2D-F8 is a 50 ton truck. Bowser part 74277, Red Caboose part 5009,
Kadee part 517 and Sunshine part TM7. This truck was used under some H22
but no H21 cars. These trucks were used under FM, GLa, GLb, GLc, GLe,
GLf, GLg, GP, GPa, GR, GRa, GS, GSa, GSc, GSd, H22, K7, K8, U6, XL, XLa,
XLc, X23, X23a, X23b, X24, X25, X25a, X25b, X25c, X25d, X28a, X29, X29a,
X30 class cars.

The ASF-3 50 ton truck was PRR classes 2D-F25, 2D-F26, 2D-F26a. These
were used under X38, X40, X40a, X40b, X41, X41a and X41b class cars.

The ASF-3 70 ton truck was PRR classes 2E-F22, 2E-F22a, 2E-F22b and
2E-F22f

Rich Orr



------------------------------------

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