Date   

Georgia & Florida Logo

dphobbies
 

Can anyone reference a photo or have one of the G&F triangle logo? It does not have to be perfect or dead on, but readable enough to create decal art. Ideally a photo of a gondola with that logo would be great.
Thanks.

Ron Sebastian
Des Plaines


Re: Looking for photo of 1,958 cu ft LO SHPX 25491-25494

Ed Hawkins
 

On Mar 8, 2012, at 4:03 PM, Aley, Jeff A wrote:

Does anyone know of a photo of SHPX 25491-25494? I would like to confirm that the lettering placement is the same as shown at http://www.trainlife.com/magazines/pages/89/6356/january-1992-page-22 , except that "Westvaco Wyoming" is replaced with "Lawrence Kansas".

Thanks for your help,

-Jeff

Jeff,
I have photos of 3 of the 4 groups of Westvaco covered hoppers, the Lawrence Kansas car being the only one lacking photos. The other three were lettered the same as in the link, so I'm pretty sure they would be lettered in the same way.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: An update from Scotty Mason

Scott Pitzer
 

Scotty, we hardly knew ye.



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Re: Semet-Solvay Type 27 Tank Cars

al_brown03
 

Yes, exactly. See R.W. Jones, "Boston & Maine: City and Shore", p 80.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., FRANK PEACOCK <frank3112@...> wrote:


On Nov. 1, 1947 Semet-Solvay Co. began to be operated as a Division of Allied Chemical & Dye Corp. It, along with Barrett Co., General Chemical Co. and others had been "wholly-owned subsidiaries" since 1920. The question I have is: did they change the lettering to reflect this change? I suspect that it was changed to maybe something like "Semet-Solvay Division of Allied Chemical & Dye Corp." Those of us modeling in 1947 and before are probably safe with "Company" but much later, in the 1950's who knows? The principle plants of Semet-Solvay were located at the following places: Ashland, Ky., Buffalo, NY, Ironton, Ohio, and Detroit, Mich. The Division "produces coke, gas and coal tar crudes such as creosote, ammonia, light oils, etc." Ref. 1949 Moody's Industrials, p. 2508-2509. FHP (Frank H. Peacock)

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Pennsy 50' boxcar kits by Branchline

Andy Carlson
 

The last of my Pennsylvania Branchline Blueprint 50' boxcar kits.

B-L # 9014, PRR X44 50' riveted 8' single door. Shawdow Keystone scheme. Blt
1951 1955 repaint. #s are PRR 604612; 604616; 604103. Part of the Blueprint
"special edition" series.

B-L #1011, PRR X44 50' riveted 8' single door. Circle Keystone scheme, as
delivered 1951. PRR #s are 604158; 60421; 604083; 604392.

B-L 1717, PRR X53 50' single plug door. Shadow Keystone scheme, blt 1959. PRR #s
21298; 21142; 21007; 21235.

All Branchline kits are priced at $11.00 each.

I also have Red caboose X29 undec kits.
RC #-7001 X29 1928 body, dreadnaught ends (Have four)
RC #-7005 X29 1924 body, plate ends (have four)

All RC kits are $16.00 each.

Shipping is $2.50 for 1st car, $2.00 each for two cars or more. Buy 5 -8,
flat-rate is $11.35.


I accept checks, and with a 3%+$0.50 surcharge, I accept PayPal.

If interested, please contact me off-list at <midcentury@...>.
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


new decal

jerryglow2
 

At a customer request, I've done a supplemental set for F&C's Lake Terminal gondola which includes new reporting marks, car number, weight data and a diamond logo more appropriate for modelers at the later stages of the period covered by this group. The picture I worked from had an ACI label so the scheme is good for a considerable period. I'd be interested in time frames and further information but keep inquiries about sales, OFF LIST please.
see: http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/samples/Lake_Terminal.jpg
--
Jerry Glow
The Villages FL
http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/decals/


Re: Ted Culotta

Tim O'Connor
 

I got a bunch of Red Caboose stock car kits from Ted in December, and he was
at the Springfield show. He still owes me decals for the stock cars, but I hope it
doesn't take a year to get them. He has started producing more kits because his
caster has started to supply him again. That's why he had the Erie rebuilds for
sale at Springfield. The unreliability of most resin vendors makes me really
appreciate Al Westerfield, Martin Lofton and Stev e Funaro so much more!

Tim O'Connor


Re: Self-Adhering Masking Material that can be Laser Cut

jerryglow2
 

they're essestially plotters with a cutter blade for a stylus. Like watching a "whirling dirvish" in action.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., "John H" <sprinthag@...> wrote:

yes, they use knife type cutters. I sure wouldn't want be around anywhere someone was trying to cut (melt) vinyl with a laser.

John Hagen

--- In STMFC@..., "Aley, Jeff A" <Jeff.A.Aley@> wrote:

Note that vinyl is specifically NOT recommended for most LASER cutters, due to the corrosive nature of the fumes produced. Apparently, vinyl cutters use a different kind of machinery (knives??)

Regards,

-Jeff


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of jerryglow@
Sent: Thursday, March 08, 2012 9:36 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Self-Adhering Masking Material that can be Laser Cut



Vinyl. As a custom painter in SoCal, I had lots of orders for SP bloody nose units and got tired of hand cutting masks. I drew it and had a friend with a vinyl cutter make me a bunch. I also made some to paint signs on brick buildings.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@...<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>, Bill Welch <fgexbill@> wrote:

As those of you that were at the "Boutique Marketing of Kits & Parts"
discussion at Cocoa Beach may remember, I am slowly putting together
components to create a little kit to make it easy to model one of the
10K Semet Solvay Type 27 tank cars using the InterMountain kit. The
cars had a silver dome. In addition to a resin deck, photoetched
railings/corner posts/support brackets and decals, I would really
like to include a Laser Cut painting mask to make it easy to paint
the riveted dome collar that is part of the tank body. There is a
photo of the prototype of Volume 3 of the RR Prototype CYC.

The Czech Republic company "Eduard" includes an extensive line of
Laser Cut self-adhering painting masks for military vehicles and
aircraft, so I know this can be done. Does anyone on this list have
any information on who makes a raw material that could be used to
create such masks.

Please no questions about the "when?" and "how much?" of the
aforementioned kit. When I know, you will know.

Thank you!
Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727.470.9930
fgexbill@



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Re: Ted Culotta

jerryglow2
 

He sells on ebay from what he has. Some of his "kitbashes in a box" kits are being offered as custom parts only partilly due to Branchline's exit from the market.

Jerry Glow
http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/decals/

--- In STMFC@..., "Andy Miller" <aslmmiller@...> wrote:

Does anyone know if Ted Culotta and Speedwitch are still in business? I have recieved no reply to several emails sent recently. The Speedwitch website had an update in late October 2011.

regards,

Andy miller

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


5th Avenue Shops

Steve SANDIFER
 

Is 5th Avenue Shops still in business. I sent them an order and check 2 months ago with no reply and no cancelled check.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417


Re: Ted Culotta

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

I've had a prepaid order for two kits in since October 2010, and Ted
responded to my inquiries about projected delivery through October 2011,
promising imminent delivery in his last email. I still don't have the kits,
and he hasn't responded to my last email from 29 Feb 2012 in which I told
him to ship what he has and refund prepayment for the rest. I understand
life has been hard for Ted, but a year and a half wait proved too much for
me.



Nelson Moyer

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Andy
Miller
Sent: Friday, March 09, 2012 10:09 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Ted Culotta





Does anyone know if Ted Culotta and Speedwitch are still in business? I have
recieved no reply to several emails sent recently. The Speedwitch website
had an update in late October 2011.

regards,

Andy miller


Ted Culotta

Andy Miller
 

Does anyone know if Ted Culotta and Speedwitch are still in business? I have recieved no reply to several emails sent recently. The Speedwitch website had an update in late October 2011.

regards,

Andy miller


Semet-Solvay Type 27 Tank Cars

FRANK PEACOCK
 

On Nov. 1, 1947 Semet-Solvay Co. began to be operated as a Division of Allied Chemical & Dye Corp. It, along with Barrett Co., General Chemical Co. and others had been "wholly-owned subsidiaries" since 1920. The question I have is: did they change the lettering to reflect this change? I suspect that it was changed to maybe something like "Semet-Solvay Division of Allied Chemical & Dye Corp." Those of us modeling in 1947 and before are probably safe with "Company" but much later, in the 1950's who knows? The principle plants of Semet-Solvay were located at the following places: Ashland, Ky., Buffalo, NY, Ironton, Ohio, and Detroit, Mich. The Division "produces coke, gas and coal tar crudes such as creosote, ammonia, light oils, etc." Ref. 1949 Moody's Industrials, p. 2508-2509. FHP (Frank H. Peacock)


ACF photos of DRGW Stock Cars-Contact the Curator

NicholasF
 

Please accept my apologies for a non-technical post, but this seems to be a forum where I may get in contact with the person I'm looking for.

If anyone on this list contacted the Barriger Library regarding ACF photos of lots of DRGW Stock Cars, please call the curator. I've lost the note with your contact information on it to report the results of my search.

For those who may not know, the John W. Barriger III Library at the University of Missouri St. Louis has a significant collection of files and photos from ACF. (from the steam era to the diesel) We are open to the public but it is suggested that you contact us before you visit. We have a finding aid that is based on a catalog we received from ACF, but it is not 100% accurate to all the files that were sent by ACF to the Barriger.

If you'd like to learn more please check out our website at http://www.umsl.edu/barriger

Our prices for research services and duplication(where we do the work) can be found here: http://www.umsl.edu/mercantile/gen-info/mercsource.html

There is no charge for you to visit and use our reading room or the open stacks, but a head's-up is appreciated if we need to get items that are stored in the vault or from the off-site storage facility.

Take Care
-Nick Fry

Curator
John W. Barriger III National Railroad Library
Mercantile Library @ UMSL
http://www.umsl.edu/barriger

and still Archivist and Director at Large for the B&ORRHS
http://www.borhs.org


Re: Tank cars -vs- Pipelines & Trucks

FRANK PEACOCK
 

Gentlemen, Finally a subject that I feel that I can comment on: Petroleum transport costs. Ships were cheaper, Texas to Bayway, NJ for example. In 1952 from Colorado City, Texas to Bayway: a. Pipeline $0.780/BBL; b. Railroad $2.830/BBL; Tanker $0.655. Note that Colorado City is a ways away from the Texas Gulf Coast, so some of the aforementioned cost was for PL T'port. For example for the tanker there was a gathering charge of $.055, a PL tariff of .200. The source that I used for this information is The Growth of the Integrated Oil Companies-McLean &Haigh, mostly page 184. The authors do make the point that it is difficult to generalize because costs can vary widely depending on volume, distance, terrain. Colorado City is on the eastern edge of the Permian Basin of Texas/NM. FHP (Frank H. Peacock)

To: STMFC@...
From: thompson@...
Date: Thu, 8 Mar 2012 19:02:39 -0800
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Tank cars -vs- Pipelines & Trucks




























Tom Birkett wrote:

Usually pipeline transportation was cheapest followed by water
(coastal or river), then rail and truck.


Sure, once you have a pipeline. If not, always cheaper NOW to use

a ship.



Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...

Publishers of books on railroad history


















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Tank cars -vs- Pipelines & Trucks

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tom Birkett wrote:
Usually pipeline transportation was cheapest followed by water (coastal or river), then rail and truck.
Sure, once you have a pipeline. If not, always cheaper NOW to use a ship.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Tank cars -vs- Pipelines & Trucks

Tom Birkett <tnbirke@...>
 

In Oct 1960 the Phillips owned or finance leased fleet of tank cars numbered
3921 (with the total fleet being 4007, the balance being covered hoppers in
carbon black and plastic pellet service.)



Yes, the Sinclair crude supply was typically a long way from their refining
capacity and frequently out of the way as far as pipelines were concerned.
The impact of full service lease cars on the fleet size is difficult to
assess but typically the Chief Financial Officer (or the title that used
before 1960) made the "buy vs lease" decision. Sometimes the company
philosophy on leasing cars changed with personnel promotions in the Treasury
Department and the need for capital in other parts of the company. Phillips
had its own shops as did Mobil (and probably others at one time or another)
so their fleets were skewed toward owned or finance leased cars (which
carried reporting marks as if owned) .



Usually pipeline transportation was cheapest followed by water (coastal or
river), then rail and truck.



Tom





Thomas N. Birkett, PE

Southwestern Tank Line, LLC


Re: Tank cars -vs- Pipelines & Trucks

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Mar 8, 2012, at 5:08 PM, Anthony Thompson wrote:

Jim Betz wrote:
Way back when - say in the 30's or so - the majority of the
petroleum products being shipped long distances used tank cars.
Today it appears that the majority of petroleum products are piped
or moved (usually short distances) in trucks.
Jim, as far back as the turn of the 20th century, pipelines
were built from producing fields to refineries as soon as at all
possible, because of the sheer volumes of oil. Very few oil fields of
any size continued shipping via tank car for very long. Thus any tank
car loads of crude oil would only have occurred for short periods in
very specific areas....
Largely true, but there was one notable exception: the Sinclair
Refining Co. Sinclair's crude oil supplies were in many cases a long
way from their refineries and the company had relatively few
pipelines, so both crude oil and refined products were shipped in
tank cars. That's why Sinclair owned, throughout the period covered
by this list, by far the largest privately owned tank car fleet in
North America (almost 5,000 cars in 1/53, in contrast to ±1,200 each
for Mid-Continent, Shell, and Tidewater).


Richard Hendrickson



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Re: "Unit Trucks"

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Mar 8, 2012, at 4:40 PM, S wrote:

A friend of mine just gave me a copy of an advertisemet in the June
'51 TRAINS magazine. This is an advertisement for "UNIT Truck,"
apparently the name of a company. It shows a photo of ERIE 21031,
one of the ERIE's early two-bay covered hoppers. I believe this is
the prototype of the beautiful O-scale model done by Gene Diemling
and published in Model Railroader some years ago.

The ad says that the ERIE has over 7000 of it's newest cars
equipped with these trucks and refers to them as having "Unit
hanger-less brake rigging."

There is a lot I havent heard of, and that includes "Unit Trucks."
What can you guys tell me about them. I will post a scan of the
advertisement later tonight or tomorrow night, as I'm not home at
the moment.
Schulyer, the Unit Truck Co. did not make freight car trucks; they
made Unit brake beams and brake beam guides which could be applied to
almost any of the post-WW-II truck designs. Unit brake beams would
fit conventional AAR trucks with or without spring planks as well as
various trucks with built in snubbers such as the Barber S-2, ASF
A-3. National B-1 and C-1, Scullin LV, Buckeye CR, Chrysler FR-5E,
etc. So the presence of Unit brake beams and guides tells one
nothing about the trucks to which they were fitted. See the '46 Car
Builders' Cyclopedia pp 1146-1149 and the '53 Car Builders'
Cyclopedia, pp 982-984. The photos I have of cars built for the Erie
in that period show them to have been equipped mostly with Barber
S-2, National B-1, and ASF A-3 trucks.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Tank cars -vs- Pipelines & Trucks

Cyril Durrenberger
 

For example for the Humble, Texas oil field.  For the fist year there was a massive amount of crude shipped by tank car until they built the pipeline and then the tank car shipping disappeared as quick as it started.  This was in 1904 and 1905.

Cyril Durrenberger

--- On Thu, 3/8/12, Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Tank cars -vs- Pipelines & Trucks
To: STMFC@...
Date: Thursday, March 8, 2012, 5:08 PM
















 









Jim Betz wrote:

Way back when - say in the 30's or so - the majority of the
petroleum products being shipped long distances used tank cars.
Today it appears that the majority of petroleum products are piped
or moved (usually short distances) in trucks.


Jim, as far back as the turn of the 20th century, pipelines

were built from producing fields to refineries as soon as at all

possible, because of the sheer volumes of oil. Very few oil fields of

any size continued shipping via tank car for very long. Thus any tank

car loads of crude oil would only have occurred for short periods in

very specific areas. But I think you are asking about refined

products. AFAIK there were no long-distance pipelines for refined

products before the World War II pipelines described already by Bruce

Smith. It was easier to use coastwise tankers (when there were no

hostile submarines!), and even today a lot of refined product moves

all over the world, including coastwise in the U.S., by tanker. It's a

cheap shipping method.



Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA

2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com

(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...

Publishers of books on railroad history



























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