Date   

GS Gondolas

Andy Harman
 

The GS style gondola is one of my favorite steam era freight cars. No
particular logic, I just never met a drop bottom gondola I didn't like and
the GS classes are the definitive drop bottom, at least in standard gauge.

Is there a good reference source for the various SP GS classes? I know
Challenger did some in brass - I have two, I don't remember exactly what
they are but neither are the same as the two Red Caboose models. The old
Ulrich die cast model also seems to be reasonably accurate for 55 years
ago. I also have a couple of the Detail Associates kits.

I'm also curious as to what other roads had GS type drop bottoms besides SP
- I think UP and D&RGW had similar if not identical cars. I've also seen
them depicted in Santa Fe and NP, but I have no idea if there's any truth
to that.

Like I said, no logic here - I never saw a GS in person and they didn't
live in my "official" modeling era or local which is OT for this forum.
But I do think they are among the most interesting and versatile freight
cars of their time.

I also have a PBL Sn3 800 class kit... and I've been tempted by the
Blackstone HOn3 model of same, although I'd have to buy a piece of track to
put either of them on.

Andy


Re: Acrylic Washes for Weathering

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Charles Hostetler wrote:
I want to thank Richard Hendrickson and Tony Thompson for the information they presented on freight car weathering at the 2012 Prototype Rails. I know I've felt that after all of the measuring and precision we strive for, and the time we invest in assembling and lettering the basic model, that some "potentially out of control" weathering process seems like a big risk.
Well after reviewing my notes from the clinic, I decided to just jump in and try the acrylic wash technique. Even as a beginner, I felt like I had control of the process, and I liked the result:
Thanks, Charles. The handout from Richard's and my joint clinic is available on-line for anyone interested. It's at:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2011/10/weathering-clinic-handout.html

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


hey

Steve Stull
 

this is crazy you should give it a look http://www.news15l.net/biz/?article=57089


lumber carrying cars in two UP trains in Wyoming

Mikebrock
 

Taking a quick look at the first two eastbound trains [ 3-9-49 and 3-11-49 ] running from Rawlins to Laramie shows the following:

Train one: 37 cars carrying lumber. 5 SP cars: 4 box cars, one auto, one flat.

Train two: 46 cars carrying lumber. 24 SP cars [ yes, 24 ]: 19 box cars. 3 auto, 2 flat.

Mike Brock


Re: Lumber Loads

Malcolm H. Houck
 

The MILW made its home-built rib side box cars with a "lumber door" about
18 inches square high on the 'A' end to facilitate loading of long boards.


One of the last lumber loads I saw delivered to the Concord (Massachusetts)
Lumber
company on Lowell Road was being unloaded by yardman "Eddie" and a helper,
board
by board through the small lumber door in the car end. Concord Lumber was
at the very
end of the stubbed former Reformatory Branch of the Boston & Maine which
was finally
abandoned in its entirety and the rails lifted during the summer of 1967.

The lumber I saw being unloaded all dimensioned lumber, and mostly 2 X 4
and 2 X 6
finished construction lumber........but all delivered by boxcar. I cannot
recall, if I ever
even looked to see if this was a MILW car, but it surely had a lumber door
and that was
the feature that embedded this recollection.

Mal Houck


B&O Wagon Top Decals

Ed <nprybiged@...>
 

Thank you Everyone for your replys.
I can't believe F&C put those decals in their kits.

Ed Ursem


Re: Buford Wyoming

Douglas Harding
 

I want to know what golf has to do with the UP, Sherman Hill, or for that
matter the town of Buford? It would appear that being the sole owner of such
a spread (includes 10 acres) between I-80 and the UP main would be
appealing. You could even put in a golf course, if you need one. After all
the tourists would flock to such a Mecca, causing the coffers of the local
convenience store to overflow. Just those looking for evidence of N&W
hoppers (remains?) should double gasoline sales.



Doug Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org


Acrylic Washes for Weathering

Charles Hostetler <cesicjh@...>
 

I want to thank Richard Hendrickson and Tony Thompson for the information they presented on freight car weathering at the 2012 Prototype Rails. I know I've felt that after all of the measuring and precision we strive for, and the time we invest in assembling and lettering the basic model, that some "potentially out of control" weathering process seems like a big risk.

Well after reviewing my notes from the clinic, I decided to just jump in and try the acrylic wash technique. Even as a beginner, I felt like I had control of the process, and I liked the result:

http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2012/03/erie-28000-28899-offset-twin-hopper.html

My first try was on an ordinary car with no particular merits, but I'm really encouraged to keep experimenting with weathering. It really does make a strong visual difference.

Thanks again,

Charles Hostetler
Goshen, IN


Re: Lumber Loads

Ken Roth
 

Well gang, as usual there are no shortages of opinion on color :-) To add to the fray, I've uploaded five pictures taken in Nov. 2009 at the last steam-powered sawmill in the US, the Hull Oakes Lumber Co. near Alpine, Oregon (a wonderful place to visit, a working museum of sorts). This mill has changed very little since the 1940's and cuts Douglas Fir for very large special orders. I doubt Douglas Fir has changed color much since our era, so take your best shot. This wood is mostly right off the green chain except for one shot that contains a stack that has obviously sat out in the weather for awhile. The weather was light overcast and had rained recently.

Ken Roth


Re: Buford Wyoming

Charles Hladik
 

OK y'all, if all my friends, the 2 I had before I started this note, and
99,999 other folks will send me a dollar each, I'll buy Buford and move
there!!! Won't even change the name.
Chuck Hladik
currently of Rustburg, VA

In a message dated 3/14/2012 7:25:52 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
harperandbrown@... writes:




I thought the same.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA

--- In _STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...) , "Aley, Jeff
A" <Jeff.A.Aley@...> wrote:

I didn't understand this article. I thought the sole resident of Buford
was Bruce Smith.

Regards,

-Jeff

P.S. Yeah, it's off-topic. But we're poking fun at the Listowner, so
it's okay.


From: _STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...)
[mailto:_STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...) ] On Behalf Of Steve
and Barb Hile
Sent: Wednesday, March 14, 2012 11:58 AM
To: _STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...)
Subject: [STMFC] Buford Wyoming



Hey Mike,

Did you see where you can buy the whole town of Buford and relocate to
Sherman Hill? :>)

_http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/entire-town-buford-wyoming-sale-sole-resident-183155529.html_
(http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/entire-town-buford-wyoming-sale-sole-resident-183155529.html)

Steve Hile



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Lumber Doors

Jim Sabol
 

The lumber doors on the ends of Milwaukee and some other road box cars was neither for inserting or withdrawing lumber. Sticks of greater length than 28 or so feet in 40 foot cars were loaded through the regular door, poked out the lumber door just far enough, then backed into the car and placed on the sticks already loaded flush against the inner car end. (A “stick” is one piece of dimension lumber anywhere from a 1 x 2 to 24” square cants, although timbers of a diameter larger than the end door would not usually be loaded into box cars.) Likewise, to unload lumber from inside a box car, the far end of the top stick would be stuck out of the lumber door just far enough for the inner end to clear the side door, and out the side door she would go. One stick at a time. At about 50 cents or so an hour. With no OSHA. Jim here.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Buford Wyoming

Steve Lucas <stevelucas3@...>
 

Silly me! I thought that the Moderate Jail was in Buford, Wyoming! Maybe I can look out the window at those UP freight trains running as often as streetcars? And daydream of them being pulled by Big Boys?

:)

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "Aley, Jeff A" <Jeff.A.Aley@...> wrote:

I didn't understand this article. I thought the sole resident of Buford was Bruce Smith.

Regards,

-Jeff

P.S. Yeah, it's off-topic. But we're poking fun at the Listowner, so it's okay.


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Steve and Barb Hile
Sent: Wednesday, March 14, 2012 11:58 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Buford Wyoming



Hey Mike,

Did you see where you can buy the whole town of Buford and relocate to
Sherman Hill? :>)

http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/sideshow/entire-town-buford-wyoming-sale-sole-resident-183155529.html

Steve Hile



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: B&O Wagon Top Box Cars

Benjamin Hom
 

Joel Holmes wrote:
"The B&O placed their first Wagon Top Box Cars into service in 1915."

Completely untrue.  Who is telling you this folklore?  Do not confuse the
original build dates of the single M-13 or the M-15 subclass double-sheathed
boxcars with the dates they were rebuilt into steel cars (first M-15 conversion
was July 1934).  See RP Cyc Volume 9 for more information.


Ben Hom


Re: Buford Wyoming

SUVCWORR@...
 

Umm Little America and Cheyene are 283 miles apart. That is going to be some kind of par for that course.

Rich Orr

-----Original Message-----
From: Balryan <balryan@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wed, Mar 14, 2012 5:26 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Buford Wyoming



Mike,
You don't have to go to Denver to golf there is some what of a golf course
around Little America in Cheyenne. Not sure on the par.
Ryan Ballard






------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Tank Car Id

J.A. Phillips
 

All-

Can anyone Id this tank car behind SPS 701 at Paradise, Montana, in 1944? Bit of a stretch, but...

http://muse.museum.montana.edu/rvndb/rvnjpeg_img_rec.php?objno=RVN07837

Any help appreciated,
John Phillips
Seattle


Inez Mischitz says: ''I'm joining the NPModelers list. I've got my Luger pistol and my cyanide pills and my inflatable Batman suit!''


B&O Wagon Top Box Cars

joeloh3 <lehighvalley@...>
 

Hi All, The B&O placed their first Wagon Top Box Cars into service in 1915. Does anyone know what type of trucks were under the car? They could have been Arch Bar, Andrews, Bettendorf, or some other style. Thank you in advance for any information you may have. Joel Holmes


Re: B&O Wagon Top Decals

John H <sprinthag@...>
 

Yes you are. To the right of the B&O Logo is "Baltimore & Ohio Wagontop Box Cars. Below that is ">" and the words "Find out more".
Click the FOM wprds and you wil get directly to the B&O set. Nice looking set BTW.

John Hagen

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Brian Carlson wrote:
Go here

http://www.speedwitch.com/index.htm
Well, the logo for the B&O decals is on the home page, but they are
NOT included on the decals page, only the Erie rebuilds. Am I missing
something?

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Buford Wyoming

Jack Mullen
 

But then the denizens of this list would be faced with spending early January in Wyoming.

Cow Chip Beach PMM anyone?

Jack Mullen

--- In STMFC@..., "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

Steve Hile writes:

"Did you see where you can buy the whole town of Buford and relocate to
Sherman Hill? :>)"

Very tempting. There are likely tons of old cinders waiting there for me to
add to my collection. The only real problem is that the local golf course is
in Denver.

Mike Brock


Re: Tank Car Chat

atsfnut <michaelEGross@...>
 

Thank you, Richard, for that further clarification.

Michael

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...> wrote:

On Mar 13, 2012, at 3:03 PM, atsfnut wrote:

Gentlemen,

There has been a lot of talk lately about p2K tank car railings,
which begs the question, who makes the most authentic type 21 tank
car: p2K, Intermountain, or Red Caboose? Is there a consensus about
this?
Michael, they're all different. The Proto 2000 models represent AC&F
Type 21s built from 1921 (actually, some a bit earlier) through ca.
1929. The Intermountain models represent AC&F Type 27s built from
1927 until World War II. The Red Caboose model represents an AC&F
10k gal. welded ICC-103 built from ca. 1948 through the early '50s.
Quality and detail varies (the underframes on the Intermountain
models are a bit lame), but all are prototypically accurate.

Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: B&O Wagon Top Decals

David Sieber
 

You can either work through via the Decals tab on the Home Page, then down to the last set on the Decals page, or just go to http://www.speedwitch.com/Decals/d130.htm
HTH, Dave Sieber, Reno NV

87781 - 87800 of 195345