Date   

Re: mystery brass stock car

Steve SANDIFER
 

It is a ATSF SK-S, same car that Intermountain modeled, but with correct end. SK-Q doors and end are different. Probably Pecos River.
______________
J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer
mailto:steve.sandifer@...
Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918
Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX 77025, 713-667-9417

----- Original Message -----
From: al_brown03
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, March 24, 2012 8:06 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: mystery brass stock car



Hmm ... Santa Fe Sk-Q or Sk-S?

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:
>
>
> I don't recognize this model -- it has chain mechanism
> similar to the (AHM) NYC stock cars... but is different.
>
> http://www.ebay.com/itm/260987370054
>
> Tim O'
>


Re: mystery brass stock car

al_brown03
 

Hmm ... Santa Fe Sk-Q or Sk-S?

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


I don't recognize this model -- it has chain mechanism
similar to the (AHM) NYC stock cars... but is different.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/260987370054

Tim O'


Re: mystery brass stock car

Tom Madden
 

Pecos River Brass? Santa Fe Sk-?

Tom Madden

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


I don't recognize this model -- it has chain mechanism
similar to the (AHM) NYC stock cars... but is different.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/260987370054

Tim O'


mystery brass stock car

Tim O'Connor
 

I don't recognize this model -- it has chain mechanism
similar to the (AHM) NYC stock cars... but is different.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/260987370054

Tim O'


Re: What is Prototype Modeling?

Joel Holmes <lehighvalley@...>
 

Hi Tim,

I agree with you as MRR layouts are always somewhat inaccurate, but can
convey the look and feel of the real thing. Levels is merely a way of
quantifying how close you get to the real thing. Remember, your model
railroad is what you want it to be. Don't knock yourself out trying to
get something you cannot get.

Happy Model Railroading.

Joel Holmes

Joel, I don't know about "levels" or whatever. I have a very
simple definition --

If there is a prototype for your model, and your model is a close
approximation to the prototype, then that is a prototype model. I
don't see any need to put a finer point on that.

There are RPM freight cars, locomotives, structures, and yes, even
layouts. There is even RPM 'operations' in theory, but I have never
seen such, anywhere. I think for most it would be a "fun killer". I
believe most layout operations are the equivalent of Athearn "blue
box" models -- somewhat inaccurate representations that convey the
"look and feel" of the real thing.

Tim O'


Re: What is Prototype Modeling?

Tim O'Connor
 

Joel, I don't know about "levels" or whatever. I have a very
simple definition --

If there is a prototype for your model, and your model is a close
approximation to the prototype, then that is a prototype model. I
don't see any need to put a finer point on that.

There are RPM freight cars, locomotives, structures, and yes, even
layouts. There is even RPM 'operations' in theory, but I have never
seen such, anywhere. I think for most it would be a "fun killer". I
believe most layout operations are the equivalent of Athearn "blue
box" models -- somewhat inaccurate representations that convey the
"look and feel" of the real thing.

Tim O'


Re: Prototype Modeler

Joel Holmes <lehighvalley@...>
 

Yes Joel

Joel Holmes wrote:
Hi Tony,
Can you define a "prototype modeler"?
Of course I could, but would it match what MR meant in their
survey? would it match what YOU think it means? or anyone who was
surveyed? I do know that there are individuals out there, who play
pretty fast and loose with the prototype, but because there is a
prototype out there somewhere on the horizon, do consider themselves
prototype modelers. How many others would agree is an open question.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: What is Prototype Modeling?

Joel Holmes <lehighvalley@...>
 

Hi Tim,

I will bet that you could categorize prototype modeling into several, or
so, levels. I consider my self somewhat a prototype modeler. However, I
do not run out and get the latest museum quality model, but instead
scratch build my own cars. I try to do what I call the flavor of
prototype modeling. For example, a railroad running between Wilkes-Barre
and Sayre, PA is close to 100 miles. Compromises must be made due to
limited space. I know of no modeler or club that could model 100 scale
miles, even in TT. I model several stations along the line as close as
possible to the prototype using pictures and maps of the area. My
building as as prototype as I can get. Out of necessity, they are scratch
build. Off course, things changed as time goes by. Building were built,
taken down, tracks are added, removed, rerouted, and often junctions
trackage was changed. To be totally prototype, you need to pick a day and
model for that day. Not very practical. Lets say traffic on the line
included a lot of coal movements of 80 to 100 cars. How many model
railroads can do that? Can you get even 50 cars that are equal to the mix
that the real railroad ran. I doubt that also. However, a model train of
25 coal cars using similar to or models of the actual cars will look very
good. Medium and large stations facilities cannot be modeled exactly as
the prototype. Only small stations can approach this. This to me is more
prototype modeling than having trains running on many loops, through
tunnels and over high bridges. Yes, they look nice and are interesting,
but not very prototypical. How many of us modelers, who insist that every
thing about a car must be exactly like the prototype, run these cars on a
layout with prefabbed track and generic buildings and in a small space? I
prefer to look at the prototype layout as capturing as much of the spirit
of the real railroad as possible given time, space and money.

I am sure many will disagree with me, but I believe you can define
prototypical modeling as what ever level the modeler wants. We could go
on for hours about this subject. I hope the moderator allows this
discussion.

Joel Holmes


Joel, I think that's the point. These definitions are slippery
to begin with, so asking people how they categorize themselves
is scientifically meaningless.

On the other hand, the survey may be immensely interesting to
advertisers in Model Railroader, because peoples' perception of
themselves has a lot to do with their buying habits.

I'll bet if you surveyed NMRA members, a much higher percentage
would call themselves prototoype modelers.

Tim O'Connor




Hi Tony,

Can you define a "prototype modeler"?

Joel Holmes

Rich Orr wrote:
I think it was the December MR where the editorial referred to a
survey conducted by MR which revealed that 6% of modelers were
strict prototype modelers. Indeed a small segment of small
population.
then Pierre Oliver replied:
I'm very surprised to see the percentage that high.
Surveyors know that when questions are asked which the subject
may perceive as having a prestige component, more people will answer
in the prestige direction than actually qualify. So I think that MR
percentage describes how many people would like to THINK of themselves
as "prototype modelers." Just keep in mind Lake Woebegone, where "all
the children are above average."

Tony Thompson


Re: DIFCO Dump car

Mark Mathu
 

What is the cubic yard capacity of the Walthers HO scale Difco Dump Car?
http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/932-8606
__________
Mark Mathu
Whitefish Bay, Wis.
The Green Bay Route: http://www.greenbayroute.com/

--- In STMFC@..., "John C. La Rue, Jr." <MOFWCABOOSE@...> wrote:


It is always dangerous to try to reason with inadequate data, but I cannot find any evidence that DIFCO cars of the design represented by the Walthers models were built any earlier then about 1964. DIFCO was the last builder of dump cars in this country.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL





-----Original Message-----
From: Brian <GCRDS@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tue, Oct 4, 2011 5:05 am
Subject: [STMFC] DIFCO Dump car






After spending (wasting?) time searching on the internet, and in the group archives (not a waste), I cannot seem to find any information on when Difco (Differential Steel Car Company) were built. From what I did see in the archives, they would be around in the early 1950's, but wanted to be sure. Model wise, I'm looking at the Walthers cars...not a lot of options in N Scale ya know! <G>

TIA for any info or pointers!

Take Care,

Brian R. Termunde
Midvale, UT


Re: Prototype Modeler

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Joel Holmes wrote:
Hi Tony,
Can you define a "prototype modeler"?
Of course I could, but would it match what MR meant in their survey? would it match what YOU think it means? or anyone who was surveyed? I do know that there are individuals out there, who play pretty fast and loose with the prototype, but because there is a prototype out there somewhere on the horizon, do consider themselves prototype modelers. How many others would agree is an open question.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Very good Weathering article in MR

Bill Welch
 

Speaking of MR, Charley Duckworth has authored a very fine article on weathering Steam Era freight cars in the current issue of MR. Well done Charley!

Bill Welch


Re: Prototype Modeler

Tim O'Connor
 

Joel, I think that's the point. These definitions are slippery
to begin with, so asking people how they categorize themselves
is scientifically meaningless.

On the other hand, the survey may be immensely interesting to
advertisers in Model Railroader, because peoples' perception of
themselves has a lot to do with their buying habits.

I'll bet if you surveyed NMRA members, a much higher percentage
would call themselves prototoype modelers.

Tim O'Connor

Hi Tony,

Can you define a "prototype modeler"?

Joel Holmes

Rich Orr wrote:
I think it was the December MR where the editorial referred to a
survey conducted by MR which revealed that 6% of modelers were
strict prototype modelers. Indeed a small segment of small
population.
then Pierre Oliver replied:
I'm very surprised to see the percentage that high.
Surveyors know that when questions are asked which the subject
may perceive as having a prestige component, more people will answer
in the prestige direction than actually qualify. So I think that MR
percentage describes how many people would like to THINK of themselves
as "prototype modelers." Just keep in mind Lake Woebegone, where "all
the children are above average."

Tony Thompson


Re: Prototype Modeler

Joel Holmes <lehighvalley@...>
 

Hi Tony,

Can you define a "prototype modeler"?

Joel Holmes

Rich Orr wrote:
I think it was the December MR where the editorial referred to a
survey conducted by MR which revealed that 6% of modelers were
strict prototype modelers. Indeed a small segment of small
population.
then Pierre Oliver replied:
I'm very surprised to see the percentage that high.
Surveyors know that when questions are asked which the subject
may perceive as having a prestige component, more people will answer
in the prestige direction than actually qualify. So I think that MR
percentage describes how many people would like to THINK of themselves
as "prototype modelers." Just keep in mind Lake Woebegone, where "all
the children are above average."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


What RR?

Clark Propst
 

A friend bought an undec ‘Front Range’ kit this morning at a swap meet. Think he bought it because it was an undec kit and cheap.

From what I saw it has welded sides with maybe 12 panels, 8ft door opening, diagonal panel roof. Ends are improved Dreadnaught with a rectangle pressing at the top.

Anyone have any ideas on what roads may have owned such a critter?
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: State of the RPM hobby

Norm Buckhart
 

you might want to consider that the majority of the MR readership are
not modelers, but rather model railroaders who prefer to shake the box
and run trains. A survey by RMC might be more indicative of the hobby
as a whole. Norm Buckhart

On Mar 24, 2012, at 1:08 PM, Pierre wrote:

I'm very surprised to see the percentage that high.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., SUVCWORR@... wrote:

I think it was the December MR where the editorial referred to a
survey conducted by MR which revealed that 6% of modelers were
strict prototype modelers. Indeed a small segment of small population.

Rich Orr




Anyway, it just underscored to me how rare RPM'ing really is. The
great
majority of people really do just want to have fun with the hobby,
and
realistic and prototypical rolling stock seems to be WAY DOWN on the
scale of importance to most people.







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Pre-orders, pro or con.

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
Tony, you're a well travelled fellow. To quote Stephen Stills, when you're out of town, just "Love the one you're with"! Once a year, Des Plaines Hobbies is my LHS, for example. This year I'm going to arrive a day early for Naperville so I can while away a whole afternoon at DPH... :-)
No argument whatsoever. Des Plaines is also among the very best hobby shops in the country, and I always count a visit to DPH as a mandatory part of attending Naperville. But again, it's hardly my LHS if I visit once a year--and the TSA frowns on taking paint home on the airplane, to mention just one category of possible purchases that one makes regularly if one has an LHS. Freight car kist, though, wow! DPH has a terrific stock.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: State of the RPM hobby

Tim O'Connor
 

Remember, this is a survey -- probably conducted voluntarily
(self-chosen) and the answers are self-descriptions. Not what
you would call a 'scientific' poll.

If you look at the models I've built, you'd probably call me a
true RPM'er. But if you look at all the things I've bought over
the years, you might not be so generous in your assessment! :-)

Tim O'Connor

I'm very surprised to see the percentage that high.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., SUVCWORR@... wrote:

I think it was the December MR where the editorial referred to a survey conducted by MR which revealed that 6% of modelers were strict prototype modelers. Indeed a small segment of small population.

Rich Orr


Re: State of the RPM hobby

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Rich Orr wrote:
I think it was the December MR where the editorial referred to a survey conducted by MR which revealed that 6% of modelers were strict prototype modelers. Indeed a small segment of small population.
then Pierre Oliver replied:
I'm very surprised to see the percentage that high.
Surveyors know that when questions are asked which the subject may perceive as having a prestige component, more people will answer in the prestige direction than actually qualify. So I think that MR percentage describes how many people would like to THINK of themselves as "prototype modelers." Just keep in mind Lake Woebegone, where "all the children are above average."

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Pre-orders, pro or con.

Tim O'Connor
 

Tony, you're a well travelled fellow. To quote Stephen Stills, when
you're out of town, just "Love the one you're with"! Once a year, Des
Plaines Hobbies is my LHS, for example. This year I'm going to arrive
a day early for Naperville so I can while away a whole afternoon at
DPH... :-)

Tim O'Connor

My LHS "The Original Whistle Stop" has everything and you can look
before buying, but they are full retail. Go to the discounters and
you get what you pay for.
This is certainly true of the "OWS" (I wish it WAS my LHS), but
then it's one of the country's best hobby shops. An awful lot of
modelers are nowhere close to even a mediocre hobby shop, and for them
the "buyer's dilemma" we have been dissecting still operates in full
force.

Tony Thompson


Re: State of the RPM hobby

Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

I'm very surprised to see the percentage that high.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., SUVCWORR@... wrote:

I think it was the December MR where the editorial referred to a survey conducted by MR which revealed that 6% of modelers were strict prototype modelers. Indeed a small segment of small population.

Rich Orr




Anyway, it just underscored to me how rare RPM'ing really is. The great
majority of people really do just want to have fun with the hobby, and
realistic and prototypical rolling stock seems to be WAY DOWN on the
scale of importance to most people.







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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