Date   

Re: Archer Rivet Decals

O Fenton Wells
 

Micheal, I too had similiar problems and came to the same conclusion. I
now either brush (if it is a small area) or spray the area to be
'riveted'. Then after the rivets have dried, I respary a clear coat,
lightly prior to finishing the model. I haven't had the problem since I
switched to this method. The first attempt was frustrating as these rivets
are easy to put on in rows but a pain to apply individually, to fill in the
gaps where I poped them off.
Fenton Wells
On Thu, Jun 7, 2012 at 9:13 PM, michaelegross <michaelEGross@...> wrote:

**


Thanks for the information on the Archer decals.

Just a word of advice: I recently added Archer rivet decals to a car prior
to painting and weathering. I applied the decals as I would any others:
setting them onto a glossy surface, using setting solution, etc., but
before adding a clear coat, several of the rivets fell away from the
surface during normal handling. So I reapplied the decals, but dabbed all
of them with a dot of Pledge with Future Shine acrylic floor wax, which
seems to be holding them well. I will still spray an overall matte finish
over the car prior to weathering.

I frequently use washes to weather my freight cars, so wanted the rivet
decals to hold firmly for the "trauma" that is sure to follow.

If anyone has had similar experiences with Archer decals, I would welcome
your comments.

Best wishes,

Michael

Michael Gross
La Caada, CA

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




--
Fenton Wells
3047 Creek Run
Sanford NC 27332
919-499-5545
srrfan1401@...


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Archer Rivet Decals

Andy Sperandeo
 

Hi Michael,
I haven't had the problem of Archer rivets falling off, but I've made a point of applying a sealer coat of some kind before doing anything else - Pledge with Future is a good choice. They've worked well for me, to the extent that I've come to enjoy putting them on things like underframe members that no one else will ever see. As our friend Richard H. says, greetings, fellow obsessive compulsives!
So long,
Andy


Re: Experiences with Archer Rivets

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

<While my experiences with Archer Rivets have not been associated with
<frt cars yet, I will add the following:
<
<1. I wanted to apply Archer Rivets to a replacement for an oil bunker
<top for the Athearn UP FEF-3 4-8-4. The oil bunker's top was a model of
<the excursion engine and I replaced it with a new plastic top. I used
<Archer Rivets for the rivets on the new bunker top.
<
<Lessons learned: I applied the rivets to unpainted plastic. When I spray
<painted the new top I blew some rivets off. I simply reapplied them but
<this time, I hand brushed clear Polyscale paint over the rivets. Waiting
<until the paint had dried, I then air brushed again to see how the
<rivets would hold up. Noooo problem.
<
<2. I wanted to apply Archer Rivets to a completed steel 200,000 gal
<water tank. In this case, the tank was fully painted....black.
<
<Lessons learned. When I applied the rivets...in this case, both single
<lines and double rivet lines [ the radial tank car rivets ]...I
<immediately noticed that the black colored rivets disappeared when
<appllied to a black surface when wet. When the decal had dried, it
<became visible but was then difficult to position. My advice? Apply
<Archer Rivet decals to a white plastic surface. When dry, hand brush
<with a Polyscale clear. After drying, then air brush to the desired
<color.
<
<Archer Rivets? I love them. By the next Prototype Rails at Cocoa
<Beach..Jan 10, 2013...I will have completed a new coal bunker for a C&O
<C-16 0-8-0 bashed from a P2K USRA engine. Also, I am planning to use
<Archer Rivets to produce a rather important UP Harriman head end car
<bashed from one of Jon Cagle's SC&F models.
<
<Mike Brock

I just finished using some Archer rivets on a scratchbuilt logging incline
tank car. The rivets were to be applied to a brass wrapper on the copper
tube tank and, as a test, I sprayed Testor's Gloss Lacquer on a spare tank
(well, actually a tank on which I messed up the brass wrapper) and the
rivets seemed very sturdy once dried. So, I airbrushed a coat of Gloss
Lacquer on my real tank before adding more details, etc. but constant
handling seemed to mess up the lacquer finish so I removed it with some
lacquer thinner and ultimately applied the rivets directly to the brass
wrapper. No problems. I airbrushed the tank today with Floquil and
everything is fine.

Jack Burgess


Re: Experiences with Archer Rivets

atsfnut <michaelEGross@...>
 

Thanks to everyone for sharing advice. That's the great thing about this group: sharing what we've learned and learning from that sharing. And I agree that the Archer people are great. I met them last year at Naperville, and was most impressed. It is an idea whose time has come!

What I took from my experience is that, as with almost any decal (but particularly the three-dimensional kind) is to quickly get some kind of clear coat on to protect it. I love the Future because it dries rock-hard, and I will share my experiences with the rivets when I actually get to weathering this project.

Sooooo... to be continued—and thanks for the helpful input.

Yours,

Michael Gross
La Canada, CA

--- In STMFC@..., "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

While my experiences with Archer Rivets have not been associated with frt
cars yet, I will add the following:

1. I wanted to apply Archer Rivets to a replacement for an oil bunker top
for the Athearn UP FEF-3 4-8-4. The oil bunker's top was a model of the
excursion engine and I replaced it with a new plastic top. I used Archer
Rivets for the rivets on the new bunker top.

Lessons learned: I applied the rivets to unpainted plastic. When I spray
painted the new top I blew some rivets off. I simply reapplied them but this
time, I hand brushed clear Polyscale paint over the rivets. Waiting until
the paint had dried, I then air brushed again to see how the rivets would
hold up. Noooo problem.

2. I wanted to apply Archer Rivets to a completed steel 200,000 gal water
tank. In this case, the tank was fully painted....black.

Lessons learned. When I applied the rivets...in this case, both single lines
and double rivet lines [ the radial tank car rivets ]...I immediately
noticed that the black colored rivets disappeared when appllied to a black
surface when wet. When the decal had dried, it became visible but was then
difficult to position. My advice? Apply Archer Rivet decals to a white
plastic surface. When dry, hand brush with a Polyscale clear. After drying,
then air brush to the desired color.

Archer Rivets? I love them. By the next Prototype Rails at Cocoa Beach..Jan
10, 2013...I will have completed a new coal bunker for a C&O C-16 0-8-0
bashed from a P2K USRA engine. Also, I am planning to use Archer Rivets to
produce a rather important UP Harriman head end car bashed from one of Jon
Cagle's SC&F models.

Mike Brock


Experiences with Archer Rivets

Mikebrock
 

While my experiences with Archer Rivets have not been associated with frt cars yet, I will add the following:

1. I wanted to apply Archer Rivets to a replacement for an oil bunker top for the Athearn UP FEF-3 4-8-4. The oil bunker's top was a model of the excursion engine and I replaced it with a new plastic top. I used Archer Rivets for the rivets on the new bunker top.

Lessons learned: I applied the rivets to unpainted plastic. When I spray painted the new top I blew some rivets off. I simply reapplied them but this time, I hand brushed clear Polyscale paint over the rivets. Waiting until the paint had dried, I then air brushed again to see how the rivets would hold up. Noooo problem.

2. I wanted to apply Archer Rivets to a completed steel 200,000 gal water tank. In this case, the tank was fully painted....black.

Lessons learned. When I applied the rivets...in this case, both single lines and double rivet lines [ the radial tank car rivets ]...I immediately noticed that the black colored rivets disappeared when appllied to a black surface when wet. When the decal had dried, it became visible but was then difficult to position. My advice? Apply Archer Rivet decals to a white plastic surface. When dry, hand brush with a Polyscale clear. After drying, then air brush to the desired color.

Archer Rivets? I love them. By the next Prototype Rails at Cocoa Beach..Jan 10, 2013...I will have completed a new coal bunker for a C&O C-16 0-8-0 bashed from a P2K USRA engine. Also, I am planning to use Archer Rivets to produce a rather important UP Harriman head end car bashed from one of Jon Cagle's SC&F models.

Mike Brock


Re: Archer Rivet Decals

Dave Owens
 

Bill is right. Archer attended the NE RPM in Connecticut last weekend,
and the Philadelphia meet before that. We expect they'll be at the
West Springfield, Mass. show too. They're real interested in
developing products for our hobby and they'll welcome your input and
ideas.

Dave Owens
West Hartford, Conn.


--
2013 New England/Northeast Prototype Modelers Meet
May 31-June 1, 2013 (Always the weekend after Memorial Day)
Collinsville, Connecticut
www.neprototypemeet.com


Re: Archer Rivet Decals

Tom Madden
 

Michael, Archer rivets are 3D objects and can certainly be chipped off before you get a protective coating applied. But once they're sealed in place, they're pretty durable. Frank Hodina used Archer rivets on the master pattern for Sunshine's Type 19 circumferentially riveted tank car body and sealed them with what looks like Future. I've made 15 molds (yes, fifteen) from that pattern so far and not one rivet has come off. I had to replace one handrail mount NBW, but no rivets.

Tom Madden


Thanks for the information on the Archer decals.

Just a word of advice: I recently added Archer rivet decals to a car prior to painting and weathering. I applied the decals as I would any others: setting them onto a glossy surface, using setting solution, etc., but before adding a clear coat, several of the rivets fell away from the surface during normal handling. So I reapplied the decals, but dabbed all of them with a dot of Pledge with Future Shine acrylic floor wax, which seems to be holding them well. I will still spray an overall matte finish over the car prior to weathering.

I frequently use washes to weather my freight cars, so wanted the rivet decals to hold firmly for the "trauma" that is sure to follow.

If anyone has had similar experiences with Archer decals, I would welcome your comments.

Best wishes,

Michael

Michael Gross
La Cañada, CA






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Archer Rivet Decals

Jared Harper
 

Michael,

I had a similar experience with Archer rivets. I applied them to fuel tanks for a bulk oil dealership. I applied Future to the surfaces before applying the decals, and then applied the usual decal setting solutions. Afterwards I had some of the rivets come off with handling and had to reapply them.

Jared Harper
Athens, GA

--- In STMFC@..., michaelegross <michaelEGross@...> wrote:

Thanks for the information on the Archer decals.

Just a word of advice: I recently added Archer rivet decals to a car prior to painting and weathering. I applied the decals as I would any others: setting them onto a glossy surface, using setting solution, etc., but before adding a clear coat, several of the rivets fell away from the surface during normal handling. So I reapplied the decals, but dabbed all of them with a dot of Pledge with Future Shine acrylic floor wax, which seems to be holding them well. I will still spray an overall matte finish over the car prior to weathering.

I frequently use washes to weather my freight cars, so wanted the rivet decals to hold firmly for the "trauma" that is sure to follow.

If anyone has had similar experiences with Archer decals, I would welcome your comments.

Best wishes,

Michael

Michael Gross
La Cañada, CA






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Archer Rivet Decals

Bill Schneider
 

I suspect that Archer would also also welcome these comments. Having talked to them, they seem very interested in suggestions and improvement.

Bill Schneider

From: michaelegross
Sent: Thursday, June 07, 2012 9:13 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Archer Rivet Decals


Thanks for the information on the Archer decals.

Just a word of advice: I recently added Archer rivet decals to a car prior to painting and weathering. I applied the decals as I would any others: setting them onto a glossy surface, using setting solution, etc., but before adding a clear coat, several of the rivets fell away from the surface during normal handling. So I reapplied the decals, but dabbed all of them with a dot of Pledge with Future Shine acrylic floor wax, which seems to be holding them well. I will still spray an overall matte finish over the car prior to weathering.

I frequently use washes to weather my freight cars, so wanted the rivet decals to hold firmly for the "trauma" that is sure to follow.

If anyone has had similar experiences with Archer decals, I would welcome your comments.

Best wishes,

Michael

Michael Gross
La Cañada, CA

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Archer Rivet Decals

michaelegross <michaelEGross@...>
 

Thanks for the information on the Archer decals.

Just a word of advice: I recently added Archer rivet decals to a car prior to painting and weathering. I applied the decals as I would any others: setting them onto a glossy surface, using setting solution, etc., but before adding a clear coat, several of the rivets fell away from the surface during normal handling. So I reapplied the decals, but dabbed all of them with a dot of Pledge with Future Shine acrylic floor wax, which seems to be holding them well. I will still spray an overall matte finish over the car prior to weathering.

I frequently use washes to weather my freight cars, so wanted the rivet decals to hold firmly for the "trauma" that is sure to follow.

If anyone has had similar experiences with Archer decals, I would welcome your comments.

Best wishes,

Michael

Michael Gross
La Cañada, CA






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


RR/Freight Car Web Resource

J.A. Phillips
 

All-

Off the Maritime List:

These are photos from the NYC Municipal Archives- several hundred thousand in all - that were put online by the city two months ago. For those interested, they cover not only the port, but the entire history of the city, especially its architecture.

I just ran across a fascinating photographic record of the Port of New York, You can access some 8500 photos showing all aspects of the port, from pictures of a floating grain silo to a salt lighter. The time span appears to be from about 1900 to the 1940s [I found photos listed under "railroad" including a rail tug and the S.S. _United States_ through about 1985]. I think it's well worth taking a look at:

http://nycma.lunaimaging.com/**luna/servlet/view/all?os=50&sort=Identifier%2CFormat%**2CType%2CDate

http://nycma.lunaimaging.com/luna/servlet/view/all?os=50&sort=Identifier%2CFormat%2CType%2CDate

GCT main concourse:
http://nycma.lunaimaging.com/luna/servlet/detail/RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~25~25~1240382~132455:wpa_0834?sort=Identifier%2CFormat%2CType%2CDate&qvq=q:railroad;sort:Identifier%2CFormat%2CType%2CDate;lc:RECORDSPHOTOUNITMAY~7~7,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~22~22,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~29~29,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~30~30,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~32~32,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~13~13,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~37~37,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~17~17,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~6~6,RECORDSPHOTOUNITMAY~8~8,RECORDSPHOTOUNITBRO~4~4,RECORDSPHOTOUNITBRK~1~1,RECORDSPHOTOUNITMAN~2~2,RECORDSPHOTOUNITQUE~1~1,RECORDSPHOTOUNITSTA~1~1,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~36~36,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~20~20,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~35~35,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~16~16,RECORDSPHOTOUNITMAY~1~1,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~5~5,RECORDSPHOTOUNITMAY~2~2,RECORDSPHOTOUNITMAY~6~6,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~15~15,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~24~24,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~9~9,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~19~19,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~21~21,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~34~34,RECORDSPHOTOUNITMAY~5~5,RECORDSPHOTOUNITMAY~9~9,RECORDSPHOTOUNITMAY~4~4,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~26~26,RECORDSPHOTOUNITMAY~3~3,RECORDSPHOTOUNITARC~25~25&mi=1132&trs=1133

Resolution seems a bit low, but you can zoom on photos and get a good idea as to what is there in case a reproduction is needed. Lots of freight houses, freight cars, roundhouses and switchers, including some very odd-looking NYC box cabs.

Please be governed accordingly.
JP3



"Lieutenant Commander (F)'s arguments were based on the fact that _he_ had been in the Navy since 1954 and had flown with Nelson at Trafalgar, and _I_ was some Midshipman So and So." -- Inez Mischitz, H.M.S. _Hermes_, October 4, 1979


Re: Freight Car Brown

James F. Brewer <jfbrewer@...>
 

Brian,



I have no idea; my "guess" is that Ed's data is circa 1944; perhaps he can fill in some info.



Jim

----- Original Message -----


From: "Brian Rochon" <berochon@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, June 7, 2012 4:11:24 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Freight Car Brown

 




Jim,

I notice that all of the listed colors show a start date of 1944. Did these railroads all change their color formulas in that year or would they be accurate for earlier years? I model 1943, so that means freight cars last painted as far back as the late 1930's?

Brian Rochon
Silver Spring, MD

----- Original Message -----
From: James F. Brewer<mailto: jfbrewer@... >
To: STMFC<mailto: STMFC@... >
Sent: Thursday, June 07, 2012 2:04 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Freight Car Brown

Kudos to Ed Hawkins and Tru-Color paint for developing special freight car brown colors; per the June 2012 Model Railroad Hobbyist e-zine:

"With assistance from noted historian Ed Hawkins, Tru-Color Paint ( trucolorpaint.com ) has developed special freight-car brown colors matched to prototype railroad color chips for nearly 50 railroads. Tru-Color paint is an acrylic solvent based paint that dries to a high gloss finish. It is based on a formulation similar to the old Accupaint product line but has been modified to produce a better flow for application with an airbrush directly from the bottle without thinning. The paint sells for $ 4.99 for 1 ounce bottle, $8.95 for 2 ounce bottle, or 16 ounces at $74.95. "With assistance from noted historian Ed Hawkins, Tru-Color Paint ( trucolorpaint.com ) has developed special freight-car brown colors matched to prototype railroad color chips for nearly 50 railroads. Tru-Color paint is an acrylic solvent based paint that dries to a high gloss finish. It is based on a formulation similar to the old Accupaint product line but has been modified to produce a better flow for application with an airbrush directly from the bottle without thinning. The paint sells for $ 4.99 for 1 ounce bottle, $8.95 for 2 ounce bottle, or 16 ounces at $74.95.

Tru-Color plans to introduce two new colors each month. Freight car brown for Union Pacific 1944-1960s (TCP-180), and Kansas City Southern 1944-1960, were released in May. Scheduled for release this month are Atlantic Coast Line 1944- 1960’s (TCP-182), and Chicago & Northwestern 1944-1960’s (TCP-183). The July release will include Frisco 1944-1960’s (TCP-184), and Central of Georgia 1944- 1960’s (TCP-185). Louisville & Nashville 1944-1960’s (TCP-186), and Grand Trunk Western 1944-1960’s (TCP-187), are scheduled for release in August."

All sounds interesting and very promising. Thanks for all the work!

All sounds interesting and very promising. Thanks for all the work!

Jim Brewer

Glenwood MD

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Freight Car Brown

Brian Rochon
 

Jim,

I notice that all of the listed colors show a start date of 1944. Did these railroads all change their color formulas in that year or would they be accurate for earlier years? I model 1943, so that means freight cars last painted as far back as the late 1930's?

Brian Rochon
Silver Spring, MD

----- Original Message -----
From: James F. Brewer<mailto:jfbrewer@...>
To: STMFC<mailto:STMFC@...>
Sent: Thursday, June 07, 2012 2:04 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Freight Car Brown





Kudos to Ed Hawkins and Tru-Color paint for developing special freight car brown colors; per the June 2012 Model Railroad Hobbyist e-zine:

"With assistance from noted historian Ed Hawkins, Tru-Color Paint ( trucolorpaint.com ) has developed special freight-car brown colors matched to prototype railroad color chips for nearly 50 railroads. Tru-Color paint is an acrylic solvent based paint that dries to a high gloss finish. It is based on a formulation similar to the old Accupaint product line but has been modified to produce a better flow for application with an airbrush directly from the bottle without thinning. The paint sells for $ 4.99 for 1 ounce bottle, $8.95 for 2 ounce bottle, or 16 ounces at $74.95. "With assistance from noted historian Ed Hawkins, Tru-Color Paint ( trucolorpaint.com ) has developed special freight-car brown colors matched to prototype railroad color chips for nearly 50 railroads. Tru-Color paint is an acrylic solvent based paint that dries to a high gloss finish. It is based on a formulation similar to the old Accupaint product line but has been modified to produce a better flow for application with an airbrush directly from the bottle without thinning. The paint sells for $ 4.99 for 1 ounce bottle, $8.95 for 2 ounce bottle, or 16 ounces at $74.95.

Tru-Color plans to introduce two new colors each month. Freight car brown for Union Pacific 1944-1960s (TCP-180), and Kansas City Southern 1944-1960, were released in May. Scheduled for release this month are Atlantic Coast Line 1944- 1960’s (TCP-182), and Chicago & Northwestern 1944-1960’s (TCP-183). The July release will include Frisco 1944-1960’s (TCP-184), and Central of Georgia 1944- 1960’s (TCP-185). Louisville & Nashville 1944-1960’s (TCP-186), and Grand Trunk Western 1944-1960’s (TCP-187), are scheduled for release in August."

All sounds interesting and very promising. Thanks for all the work!

All sounds interesting and very promising. Thanks for all the work!

Jim Brewer

Glenwood MD

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Freight Car Brown

James F. Brewer <jfbrewer@...>
 

Kudos to Ed Hawkins and Tru-Color paint for developing special freight car brown colors; per the June 2012 Model Railroad Hobbyist e-zine:



"With assistance from noted historian Ed Hawkins, Tru-Color Paint ( trucolorpaint.com ) has developed special freight-car brown colors matched to prototype railroad color chips for nearly 50 railroads. Tru-Color paint is an acrylic solvent based paint that dries to a high gloss finish. It is based on a formulation similar to the old Accupaint product line but has been modified to produce a better flow for application with an airbrush directly from the bottle without thinning. The paint sells for $ 4.99 for 1 ounce bottle, $8.95 for 2 ounce bottle, or 16 ounces at $74.95. "With assistance from noted historian Ed Hawkins, Tru-Color Paint ( trucolorpaint.com ) has developed special freight-car brown colors matched to prototype railroad color chips for nearly 50 railroads. Tru-Color paint is an acrylic solvent based paint that dries to a high gloss finish. It is based on a formulation similar to the old Accupaint product line but has been modified to produce a better flow for application with an airbrush directly from the bottle without thinning. The paint sells for $ 4.99 for 1 ounce bottle, $8.95 for 2 ounce bottle, or 16 ounces at $74.95.

Tru-Color plans to introduce two new colors each month. Freight car brown for Union Pacific 1944-1960s (TCP-180), and Kansas City Southern 1944-1960, were released in May. Scheduled for release this month are Atlantic Coast Line 1944- 1960’s (TCP-182), and Chicago & Northwestern 1944-1960’s (TCP-183). The July release will include Frisco 1944-1960’s (TCP-184), and Central of Georgia 1944- 1960’s (TCP-185). Louisville & Nashville 1944-1960’s (TCP-186), and Grand Trunk Western 1944-1960’s (TCP-187), are scheduled for release in August."


All sounds interesting and very promising.  Thanks for all the work!


All sounds interesting and very promising.  Thanks for all the work!



Jim Brewer

Glenwood MD

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Update - The B&O Modeler

Benjamin Hom
 

All,

Wanted to pass on an update from our last annoucement - we had planned to have
the May/June 2011 issue of The B&O Modeler uploaded to the Society website, but
caught our webmaster on a road trip this week through this weekend.  We'll have
the issue, which features information on B&O marine operations and Tom
Griffith's HO scale drawings of B&O steam tugboat Hugh L. Bond, Jr. up on the
website by early next week.  We plan on having July/August 2011 on the website
by Monday, 18 June.


Ben Hom
Associate Editor, The B&O Modeler


Photos of P&LE caboose models for "The Little Giant"

Larry Kline
 

I am working on the next issue the P&LE historical Society magazine "The Little Giant." For past issues see:
http://www.plerrhs.org/tlg/archives.html

The next issue is devoted to a 48 page article about P&LE bay window cabooses. Future articles on other types of P&LE cabooses are planned.

I would like to include some model photos in the bay window caboose article, and also future caboose articles. I would greatly appreciate receiving photos of P&LE caboose models, especially models of bay window cabooses.

Thanks,
Larry Kline
Editor, The Little Giant


Archer Rivet Decals

Bill Welch
 

The Perth Military Modeling site has photo of new "S" scale Archer Rivet decals for a tank car.

http://www.perthmilitarymodelling.com/newkitnews/archer.html

Bill Welch


Re: S.P. 4 wheel scale test cars

John C. La Rue, Jr. <MOFWCABOOSE@...>
 

And I, for one, am eagerly awaiting it also.

John C. La Rue, Jr.
Bonita Springs, FL

-----Original Message-----
From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wed, Jun 6, 2012 4:35 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] S.P. 4 wheel scale test cars





David Fontana wrote:
. . . while waiting for Tony's book on MW equipment book to be
published,
Um, that would be Ken Harrison's book.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: S.P. 4 wheel scale test cars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

David Fontana wrote:
. . . while waiting for Tony's book on MW equipment book to be published,
Um, that would be Ken Harrison's book.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


S.P. 4 wheel scale test cars

davidfontanatrains
 

I am working on an S.P. 4 wheel test car #SPMW 2510. I have an Arnold Menke photo taken in 1908 showing very dark body color (black?) with white lettering. Also, SP color book photo taken in 1955 showing gray body with black lettering. Big question, while waiting for Tony's book on MW equipment book to be published, is what color would these cars be painted in 1949?
By the way, does anyone know how Arnold Menke is doing?
David Fontana
San Martin, CA

87781 - 87800 of 197031