Date   

Re: New Shapes to come

William Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Hello Group,

Let's return this to actual freight car modeling.

I concur that having plastic rail sections could be a usable modeling product. But it is not at the top of my "wish list" of "needs".

A short while back there was a discussion within this group of "Z" structural shapes. That discussion did point out that there are a number of prototype sizes needed to model steam era freight cars. And also that the thickness of the flanges is an issue. That said, I believe that a selection of scale sized Z structural shapes would be a more usable modeling resource to most freight car modelers than plastic welded rail.

And as someone -- Dennis (?) -- has pointed out... smaller milled stock would also be a grand addition to the parts bin.

Just my 2 worth of comment. Thanks for listening.

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA




On Jun 21, 2012, at 11:13 AM, jerryglow@... wrote:

Yea, that'll make some manufacturer rich! Do you get the drift I think this is one of the most ridiculous ideas I've even seen on this site. Who's going to be the first to invest HIS money?

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., Alan Kilby <albyrno@...> wrote:

A would use it to fill isolating gaps cut in rails for appearance and to make even flow of rail,I would prefer white plastic to best match ns rail,it would also be useful for guardrails in complex turnouts with multiple guard rails to avoid possible shorts and excessive number of isolating gaps and power feeds
Alan



________________________________
From: Brian Ehni <behni@...>
To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 12:13 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] New Shapes to come





If you make them to CODE, they are scale immaterial. He's only asking for
three sizes.

Thanks!
--

Brian P. Ehni

On 6/20/12 2:02 PM, "ronald parisi" <mailto:ronald.parisi%40gmail.com> wrote:

Group:

I think that asking them to model in all 3 scales might be excessive. I
would definitely
buy it in HO scale.

Ron parisi

On Wed, Jun 20, 2012 at 2:57 PM, Ed <mailto:nprybiged%40comcast.net> wrote:

**


All

I'm going to go to Evergreen and ask them if they would consider
marketing Styrene Rail in HO, O and N scale in codes 100,83 and 55
in packages of 6, in 24" or 36" in lenght.

So, to give them a feeling of what the modelers thing about
buying something like this, would you please let me know what
your thoughts are?

Thank you
Ed Ursem



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links








[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: New Shapes to come

Bill Schneider
 

I suppose that I shouldn’t point out that the cleaner block would also remove paint from the styrene, leaving the tops whi.... never mind.

Seriously, I guess I could see some limited uses, but like Jerry it wouldn’t be high on my product investment list... However, I’ve been wrong before. I think... ;>)

Bill Schneider

From: StephenK
Sent: Thursday, June 21, 2012 2:19 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: New Shapes to come


The real answer to guard rails that don't reveal bare nickle silver would be code 82 (or Code 80) size rail. Paint it whatever color you use, and it would be slightly lower than the running rail--and the cleaner block would pass over it without removing the paint.

Steve Kay

--- In mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com, "midrly" <midrly@...> wrote:

There are many possibilities for the use of styrene rail. Not only for D&H modellers of the steam era that will have CWR next the running rails to be put in track (did any other road use much CWR in the STMFC timeframe?).

Handlaid turnouts and bridge decks (both actually relevant to STMFC'ers) could finally have guardrails that would not reveal bare nickle silver tops after track cleaning. Some railway structures used old rail as structural steel components instead of I- or H-section beams, another advantage of styrene rail shapes for the modeller.

National Steel Car had an in-plant service gon that used light rail (I have a photo of this car), probably 80# or lighter, as the posts supporting the sides of the car. This car also used the lowest third portion of their NSC-1 ends. Tricky to build out of nickle-silver rail, but easy in styrene. Maybe some roads used rail for uprights in gons as well?

As for rail length, very common in our era were 33' rails in many railways' main tracks. They fit nicely in the 36' i.l. gons and flats used to transport rail from the mill to customer. 39' rail was coming into use, but 33' rails were still very common. I don't recall any 39' rail being in use before 1910. To add to the mix, some roads chopped 18" off each battered end of rails, producing 36', 30', and 27' rails in the process. So cutting what length you want out of 36" long styrene shapes would be best for the modeller. But I'd personally appreciate even 12" lengths of Code 70/55 rail from Evergreen.

But modelling various rail-built bumpers, parking lot curbs, etc, is best done with metal rail for durability. Errant elbows do a lot of damage on a layout.

And I'll echo Dennis Storzek's thoughts on smaller-section styrene strip, such as .010" square. Maybe some 5 thou strip...please??

Steve Lucas.

--- In mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com, "Ed" <nprybiged@> wrote:

We were talking about having Evergreen,or someone make some new
shape materials.

Well I'm going to dive off on the high board and hope someone filled
the pool.

How about making Styrene Rail, yes I said Rail, in code 100, 83 and
55. Think about it. How many times have you seen photos of the Right
of Way with, depending on the era, 38' sections or welded rail along
side of the track awaiting to be rerailed, or stacks of rail stored
in a freight yard.

This also opens up the posiblety of a welded rail train. Say 15 old
wooden side dump cars with the ends removed and one or two levels of
Rail. Now, I think, if you ahcor the rail in the middle it should
bend ok without derailing the cars.

So if we can but scale HO Tie plates and Rail Joiners in Styrene why
not Scale Rail. I know it can be done just look at the pieces of iron
work that Plastruct markets.

OK, how about your thoughts.

Ed Ursem


Re: New Shapes to come

StephenK
 

The real answer to guard rails that don't reveal bare nickle silver would be code 82 (or Code 80) size rail. Paint it whatever color you use, and it would be slightly lower than the running rail--and the cleaner block would pass over it without removing the paint.

Steve Kay

--- In STMFC@..., "midrly" <midrly@...> wrote:

There are many possibilities for the use of styrene rail. Not only for D&H modellers of the steam era that will have CWR next the running rails to be put in track (did any other road use much CWR in the STMFC timeframe?).

Handlaid turnouts and bridge decks (both actually relevant to STMFC'ers) could finally have guardrails that would not reveal bare nickle silver tops after track cleaning. Some railway structures used old rail as structural steel components instead of I- or H-section beams, another advantage of styrene rail shapes for the modeller.

National Steel Car had an in-plant service gon that used light rail (I have a photo of this car), probably 80# or lighter, as the posts supporting the sides of the car. This car also used the lowest third portion of their NSC-1 ends. Tricky to build out of nickle-silver rail, but easy in styrene. Maybe some roads used rail for uprights in gons as well?

As for rail length, very common in our era were 33' rails in many railways' main tracks. They fit nicely in the 36' i.l. gons and flats used to transport rail from the mill to customer. 39' rail was coming into use, but 33' rails were still very common. I don't recall any 39' rail being in use before 1910. To add to the mix, some roads chopped 18" off each battered end of rails, producing 36', 30', and 27' rails in the process. So cutting what length you want out of 36" long styrene shapes would be best for the modeller. But I'd personally appreciate even 12" lengths of Code 70/55 rail from Evergreen.

But modelling various rail-built bumpers, parking lot curbs, etc, is best done with metal rail for durability. Errant elbows do a lot of damage on a layout.

And I'll echo Dennis Storzek's thoughts on smaller-section styrene strip, such as .010" square. Maybe some 5 thou strip...please??

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "Ed" <nprybiged@> wrote:

We were talking about having Evergreen,or someone make some new
shape materials.

Well I'm going to dive off on the high board and hope someone filled
the pool.

How about making Styrene Rail, yes I said Rail, in code 100, 83 and
55. Think about it. How many times have you seen photos of the Right
of Way with, depending on the era, 38' sections or welded rail along
side of the track awaiting to be rerailed, or stacks of rail stored
in a freight yard.

This also opens up the posiblety of a welded rail train. Say 15 old
wooden side dump cars with the ends removed and one or two levels of
Rail. Now, I think, if you ahcor the rail in the middle it should
bend ok without derailing the cars.

So if we can but scale HO Tie plates and Rail Joiners in Styrene why
not Scale Rail. I know it can be done just look at the pieces of iron
work that Plastruct markets.

OK, how about your thoughts.

Ed Ursem


Re: New Shapes to come

jerryglow2
 

Yea, that'll make some manufacturer rich! Do you get the drift I think this is one of the most ridiculous ideas I've even seen on this site. Who's going to be the first to invest HIS money?

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., Alan Kilby <albyrno@...> wrote:

A would use it to fill isolating gaps cut in rails for appearance and to make even flow of rail,I would prefer white plastic to best match ns rail,it would also be useful for guardrails in complex turnouts with multiple guard rails to avoid possible shorts and excessive number of isolating gaps and power feeds
 Alan
 


________________________________
From: Brian Ehni <behni@...>
To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 12:13 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] New Shapes to come



 

If you make them to CODE, they are scale immaterial. He's only asking for
three sizes.

Thanks!
--

Brian P. Ehni

On 6/20/12 2:02 PM, "ronald parisi" <mailto:ronald.parisi%40gmail.com> wrote:

Group:

I think that asking them to model in all 3 scales might be excessive. I
would definitely
buy it in HO scale.

Ron parisi

On Wed, Jun 20, 2012 at 2:57 PM, Ed <mailto:nprybiged%40comcast.net> wrote:

**


All

I'm going to go to Evergreen and ask them if they would consider
marketing Styrene Rail in HO, O and N scale in codes 100,83 and 55
in packages of 6, in 24" or 36" in lenght.

So, to give them a feeling of what the modelers thing about
buying something like this, would you please let me know what
your thoughts are?

Thank you
Ed Ursem







------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links







Re: New Shapes to come

midrly <midrly@...>
 

There are many possibilities for the use of styrene rail. Not only for D&H modellers of the steam era that will have CWR next the running rails to be put in track (did any other road use much CWR in the STMFC timeframe?).

Handlaid turnouts and bridge decks (both actually relevant to STMFC'ers) could finally have guardrails that would not reveal bare nickle silver tops after track cleaning. Some railway structures used old rail as structural steel components instead of I- or H-section beams, another advantage of styrene rail shapes for the modeller.

National Steel Car had an in-plant service gon that used light rail (I have a photo of this car), probably 80# or lighter, as the posts supporting the sides of the car. This car also used the lowest third portion of their NSC-1 ends. Tricky to build out of nickle-silver rail, but easy in styrene. Maybe some roads used rail for uprights in gons as well?

As for rail length, very common in our era were 33' rails in many railways' main tracks. They fit nicely in the 36' i.l. gons and flats used to transport rail from the mill to customer. 39' rail was coming into use, but 33' rails were still very common. I don't recall any 39' rail being in use before 1910. To add to the mix, some roads chopped 18" off each battered end of rails, producing 36', 30', and 27' rails in the process. So cutting what length you want out of 36" long styrene shapes would be best for the modeller. But I'd personally appreciate even 12" lengths of Code 70/55 rail from Evergreen.

But modelling various rail-built bumpers, parking lot curbs, etc, is best done with metal rail for durability. Errant elbows do a lot of damage on a layout.

And I'll echo Dennis Storzek's thoughts on smaller-section styrene strip, such as .010" square. Maybe some 5 thou strip...please??

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "Ed" <nprybiged@...> wrote:

We were talking about having Evergreen,or someone make some new
shape materials.

Well I'm going to dive off on the high board and hope someone filled
the pool.

How about making Styrene Rail, yes I said Rail, in code 100, 83 and
55. Think about it. How many times have you seen photos of the Right
of Way with, depending on the era, 38' sections or welded rail along
side of the track awaiting to be rerailed, or stacks of rail stored
in a freight yard.

This also opens up the posiblety of a welded rail train. Say 15 old
wooden side dump cars with the ends removed and one or two levels of
Rail. Now, I think, if you ahcor the rail in the middle it should
bend ok without derailing the cars.

So if we can but scale HO Tie plates and Rail Joiners in Styrene why
not Scale Rail. I know it can be done just look at the pieces of iron
work that Plastruct markets.

OK, how about your thoughts.

Ed Ursem


Re: New Shapes to come

albyrno
 

A would use it to fill isolating gaps cut in rails for appearance and to make even flow of rail,I would prefer white plastic to best match ns rail,it would also be useful for guardrails in complex turnouts with multiple guard rails to avoid possible shorts and excessive number of isolating gaps and power feeds
 Alan
 


________________________________
From: Brian Ehni <behni@...>
To: STMFC List <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 12:13 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] New Shapes to come



 

If you make them to CODE, they are scale immaterial. He's only asking for
three sizes.

Thanks!
--

Brian P. Ehni

On 6/20/12 2:02 PM, "ronald parisi" <mailto:ronald.parisi%40gmail.com> wrote:

Group:

I think that asking them to model in all 3 scales might be excessive. I
would definitely
buy it in HO scale.

Ron parisi

On Wed, Jun 20, 2012 at 2:57 PM, Ed <mailto:nprybiged%40comcast.net> wrote:

**


All

I'm going to go to Evergreen and ask them if they would consider
marketing Styrene Rail in HO, O and N scale in codes 100,83 and 55
in packages of 6, in 24" or 36" in lenght.

So, to give them a feeling of what the modelers thing about
buying something like this, would you please let me know what
your thoughts are?

Thank you
Ed Ursem







------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: New Shapes to come

jerryglow2
 

I don't think you're going to find a specialized shape like rail much cheaper than nickel silver esp if you can salvage the rail from used track.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., "Ed" <nprybiged@...> wrote:










Jerry

I consided myself as the average modeler. So I want to build and
detail a track gane center with some out buildings and with one
or two piles of different sizes of rail and have a section of
mian line with sections of rail laying on both sides, that would
look impressive.

Now if I do this and use nickle silver rail that could very easily
be in double diget dollars. I would think twice before doing that
when I could, for the same amount, add a piece of rolling stock or
structure. Now for half that amount, using Styrene, I could do that
detail project.

It's my guess that's the same thought that the other average
modelers would have, but then I might wrong.

Thanks for your reply
Ed

--- In STMFC@..., jerryglow@ wrote:

I don't understand the need for it - what's wrong with real rail?

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., Michael Watnoski <freestatesystems1@> wrote:

Hi Ed, and All,

I would be interested in the code 83 and 55
in long lengths. This is a much needed item for
detailing many structures. It was often used for
making fences and hose racks, etc around shops.

Michael


On 6/20/2012 2:57 PM, Ed wrote:
All

I'm going to go to Evergreen and ask them if they would consider
marketing Styrene Rail in HO, O and N scale in codes 100,83 and 55
in packages of 6, in 24" or 36" in lenght.

So, to give them a feeling of what the modelers thing about
buying something like this, would you please let me know what
your thoughts are?

Thank you
Ed Ursem



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: New Shapes to come

jerryglow2
 

I had the same situation when making a coil load of real soft iron wire. I made one wrap coils on the bottom layer and multiple wrap ones on top.

I just can't see any manufacturer making plastic rail esp in 3' lengths just for limited use like a rail train. We hobbiests love to suggest new products but lets get realistic unless you want to invest your life's savings.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:

Jerry

One problem with real rail is WEIGHT. A gondola or flat that weighs
the NMRA recommended amount (or even more than that) becomes ridiculously
heavy with a full (realistic) load of nickel silver rail.

I think Sunshine made a resin rail load, for example.

Tim O'



At 6/20/2012 05:09 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
I don't understand the need for it - what's wrong with real rail?
Jerry Glow


Re: New Shapes to come

Bud Rindfleisch
 

--- In STMFC@..., James Babcock <babcockjames@...> wrote:

I would have an interst in buying code 83 rail. How much is the question. I can think of several projects but the quantity of 6 piece package is great; just one per project.
Jim Babcock


________________________________
From: Ed <nprybiged@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 11:57 AM
Subject: [STMFC] New Shapes to come



 

All

I'm going to go to Evergreen and ask them if they would consider
marketing Styrene Rail in HO, O and N scale in codes 100,83 and 55
in packages of 6, in 24" or 36" in lenght.

So, to give them a feeling of what the modelers thing about
buying something like this, would you please let me know what
your thoughts are?

Styrene rail can also be useful for those who handlay their track as bridge guardrails.
Bud Rindfleisch



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: new Canadian 8-hatch reefer

de Vries <bjdevries01@...>
 

FWIIW: In Classic Freight Cars Vol. 3 by John Henderson are 3 pics of CN 8-hatch reefers: 1 with hinged doors, photographed at
Ft. Worth, TX and 2 w. plugdoors pictured at Kansas City, Missouri and Mimico, Ontario.
Ben de Vries

From: kmelvin1663
Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 4:01 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: new Canadian 8-hatch reefer


YES, We are also interested in a hinged door version of this car. The traffic that I intend to model with these cars was their operation over the Maine Central on a daily basis in the period 1962-1966 (sorry STMFC). They moved potatoes in these cars originating in Aroostook Country via the Aroostook Valley and Canadian Pacific to the Maine Central at Vanceboro for furtherance into the Boston and New York markets. In the photos we have showing their presence in this time period; the plug door cars outnumbered the older hinged door cars almost 3-to-1.
George & Kathy Melvin
Readfield, Maine

--- In mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com, "Rob Kirkham" <rdkirkham@...> wrote:

I'd certainly be interested in a few of the hinged door CPR cars.

Rob Kirkham


Re: New Shapes to come

James Babcock
 

I would have an interst in buying code 83 rail. How much is the question. I can think of several projects but the quantity of 6 piece package is great; just one per project.
Jim Babcock


________________________________
From: Ed <nprybiged@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 11:57 AM
Subject: [STMFC] New Shapes to come



 

All

I'm going to go to Evergreen and ask them if they would consider
marketing Styrene Rail in HO, O and N scale in codes 100,83 and 55
in packages of 6, in 24" or 36" in lenght.

So, to give them a feeling of what the modelers thing about
buying something like this, would you please let me know what
your thoughts are?

Thank you
Ed Ursem




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: New Shapes to come

Tim O'Connor
 

Jerry

One problem with real rail is WEIGHT. A gondola or flat that weighs
the NMRA recommended amount (or even more than that) becomes ridiculously
heavy with a full (realistic) load of nickel silver rail.

I think Sunshine made a resin rail load, for example.

Tim O'

At 6/20/2012 05:09 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
I don't understand the need for it - what's wrong with real rail?
Jerry Glow


Re: New Shapes to come

Ed <nprybiged@...>
 

Jerry

I consided myself as the average modeler. So I want to build and
detail a track gane center with some out buildings and with one
or two piles of different sizes of rail and have a section of
mian line with sections of rail laying on both sides, that would
look impressive.

Now if I do this and use nickle silver rail that could very easily
be in double diget dollars. I would think twice before doing that
when I could, for the same amount, add a piece of rolling stock or
structure. Now for half that amount, using Styrene, I could do that
detail project.

It's my guess that's the same thought that the other average
modelers would have, but then I might wrong.

Thanks for your reply
Ed

--- In STMFC@..., jerryglow@... wrote:

I don't understand the need for it - what's wrong with real rail?

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., Michael Watnoski <freestatesystems1@> wrote:

Hi Ed, and All,

I would be interested in the code 83 and 55
in long lengths. This is a much needed item for
detailing many structures. It was often used for
making fences and hose racks, etc around shops.

Michael


On 6/20/2012 2:57 PM, Ed wrote:
All

I'm going to go to Evergreen and ask them if they would consider
marketing Styrene Rail in HO, O and N scale in codes 100,83 and 55
in packages of 6, in 24" or 36" in lenght.

So, to give them a feeling of what the modelers thing about
buying something like this, would you please let me know what
your thoughts are?

Thank you
Ed Ursem



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




National Perishable Freight Committee's "Icing Stations" publication

Bill Welch
 

I recently discovered that by September 1936 the National Perishable
Freight Committee was publishing a booklet entitled Icing Stations.
As recently as 1929, this list had appeared with a slightly different
title and it also may have been published by another organization.

With this new information, I am now searching for later publication
dates of this document as I try to document as fully as I can the
Icing Stations operated by the companies that owned and/or contracted
with the FGE/WFE/BRE System. Just based on the 1929 and 1936
publications it is evident that these facilities were subject to
change, with new locations coming into operation and others being
shut down. A case-in-point was the important icing facility at Hayne
Yard on the Southern in Spartanburg, SC which did not exist in 1929.
Eventually the Spartanburg region became a large peach growing area,
requiring the railroad to develop a very large initial Icing Facility
there. I will be contacting the CSRM and other institutions but I
wanted to see if anyone on this list might have copies of this NPFC
publication they would allow me to access. "WorldCat" does not reveal
this publication at any of the many libraries that are a part of its
huge database.

As a reminder I am still trying to find examples of Perishable
Tariffs published by the Southern Freight Tariff Bureau in Atlanta, Ga.

Thank you for your attention!

Bill Welch
2225 Nursery Road; #20-104
Clearwater, FL 33764-7622
727-470-9930
fgexbill@...


Re: Evergreen--hat section? And more?

Aley, Jeff A
 

Tim,

If you want injection molded parts, then why bother Evergreen, who are not an injection-molding company? Why not find a mfr of plastic freight cars to do the hat-sections? You might even convince them to do ACCUrate RAIL.

Regards,

-Jeff


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of timboconnor@...
Sent: Friday, June 15, 2012 11:49 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Evergreen--hat section? And more?



Jeff you may never have built the Tichy rebuilt USRA box car then. :-)

This kit is completely injected molded, and includes door guides with a .010 slit which takes
an even thinner molded shim that is glued to the backside of the door -- this gives you a door
that slides in the door track like the prototype, but it is completely invisible when the door is
open and you look through at the back of a closed door on the opposite side.

My guess is that you can injection mold scale hat sections with flanges. One large mold probably
could make a hundred pieces including verticals and diagonals with and without gussets... And
maybe they could throw in some SEAM CAPS too, which is a part I dearly wish we had in styrene.

Tim O'

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jeff A Aley" <Jeff.A.Aley@...<mailto:Jeff.A.Aley%40intel.com>>

And leave an acceptably thin flange? That's the part that I can't imagine. I can't even imagine extruding a shape (from liquid styrene) that has flanges that are 0.010" or thinner.

I hope Dennis can comment, since my imagination is severely limited. :)

Regards,

-Jeff


The B&O Modeler - July/August 2011

Benjamin Hom
 

All,
 
The July/August 2011 issue of The B&O Modeler is uploaded to the Society website

at
http://www.borhs.org/modelermag/index.html
featuring the following articles:
 
Modeling B&O’S Class I-13 Caboose – Second Section by John Teichmoeller
Modeling B&O’S Class I-16 Caboose by Chris Tilley
Photo Study – B&O Class I-16 Caboose from the B&O Railroad Historical Society
Archives
 
We plan on having September/October 2011 on the website by Monday, 2 July.

 
Ben Hom
Associate Editor, The B&O Modeler


Re: New Shapes to come

John Degnan <Scaler164@...>
 

Bill and Jerry,

The initial posting (if I'm remembering correctly) dealt with the possibilirty of modeling a "welded rail train"... which cannot be done with actual rail due to it's rigidity. There is also likelihood of cheaper cost when using it for something other than track.

This is just to mention a few of the possibilities and bebefits of such a product.


John Degnan
Scaler164@...
Scaler187@...

----- Original Message -----
From: Bill Schneider
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 05:19 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: New Shapes to come


Thanks Jerry, I was wondering that myself!

For the few places on my layout that I needed rail shapes I used cut-off bits of rail. About the only place that I really could see a use for plastic rail would be for something like a gon load or similar. I also am missing the need for 36” sections which (as has been stated) would be a nightmare from a distribution standpoint. Assuming the gon load or scenic use, then wouldn’t 39 scale feet work better?

Bill Schneider

From: jerryglow@...
Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 5:09 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: New Shapes to come


I don't understand the need for it - what's wrong with real rail?

Jerry Glow

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: New Shapes to come

soolinehistory <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Bill Schneider" <bschneider424@...> wrote:
Assuming the gon load or scenic use, then wouldn’t 39 scale feet work better?

Bill Schneider

I don't understand the need for it - what's wrong with real rail?

Jerry Glow
One of Ed's initial suggested uses was welded rail, either laid out along the ROW, or on a rail train. Actual drawn metal rail is much too stiff to lay on the ground like the prototype, and it certainly won't do for a welded rail train load. Styrene in that small a cross section likely would be limber enough that multiple lengths would bend around curves.

For both these uses long lengths would be advantageous, but desire must be tempered by manufacturing reality. If 24" is the longest length Evergreen can handle within their existing product line, it would still be usefull, and easily filed to splice with scarf joints.

Dennis


Re: New Shapes to come

Bill Schneider
 

Thanks Jerry, I was wondering that myself!

For the few places on my layout that I needed rail shapes I used cut-off bits of rail. About the only place that I really could see a use for plastic rail would be for something like a gon load or similar. I also am missing the need for 36” sections which (as has been stated) would be a nightmare from a distribution standpoint. Assuming the gon load or scenic use, then wouldn’t 39 scale feet work better?

Bill Schneider

From: jerryglow@...
Sent: Wednesday, June 20, 2012 5:09 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: New Shapes to come


I don't understand the need for it - what's wrong with real rail?

Jerry Glow

--- In mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com, Michael Watnoski <freestatesystems1@...> wrote:

Hi Ed, and All,

I would be interested in the code 83 and 55
in long lengths. This is a much needed item for
detailing many structures. It was often used for
making fences and hose racks, etc around shops.

Michael


On 6/20/2012 2:57 PM, Ed wrote:
All

I'm going to go to Evergreen and ask them if they would consider
marketing Styrene Rail in HO, O and N scale in codes 100,83 and 55
in packages of 6, in 24" or 36" in lenght.

So, to give them a feeling of what the modelers thing about
buying something like this, would you please let me know what
your thoughts are?

Thank you
Ed Ursem



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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: New Shapes to come

jerryglow2
 

I don't understand the need for it - what's wrong with real rail?

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., Michael Watnoski <freestatesystems1@...> wrote:

Hi Ed, and All,

I would be interested in the code 83 and 55
in long lengths. This is a much needed item for
detailing many structures. It was often used for
making fences and hose racks, etc around shops.

Michael


On 6/20/2012 2:57 PM, Ed wrote:
All

I'm going to go to Evergreen and ask them if they would consider
marketing Styrene Rail in HO, O and N scale in codes 100,83 and 55
in packages of 6, in 24" or 36" in lenght.

So, to give them a feeling of what the modelers thing about
buying something like this, would you please let me know what
your thoughts are?

Thank you
Ed Ursem



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



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