Date   
Re: resin flat car project question

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

Can someone help me with Jerry Glows web site?
I'm trying to order but the text, in all the slots, is so
large I can't inter information. Does he have a phone
for a direct order?

Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

Re: How to unload coal 1945

James SANDIFER
 

Coal bins like this:

http://atsfrr.net/resources/Sandifer/Howard/Hamilton/Coal/Index.htm



______________________________________________

J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer

mailto:steve.sandifer@...

Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918

Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX
77025, 713-667-9417



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Gene
Sent: Friday, July 27, 2012 9:16 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: How to unload coal 1945





--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ,
water.kresse@... wrote:
This "side-delivery" process was more common in the cold Midwest prior
to the First World War . Normally these cars would dump into a chute going
into the basement of a business' boiler house or on the side of an elevated
trestle in a coal yard. I believe farmers coops would sell coal by the bag
or by mule wagon delivery.

Al Kresse
Coal was delivered in gondolas - drop-bottom or otherwise - to the Farmers
Co-op Elevator in the small Iowa town (pop. 250) in which I grew up. Oscar
Barker, one grade ahead of me in school, was paid $15.00 to shovel the coal
over the side into coal bins. (Oscar's father died when Oscar was young and
the family was in desperate situation financially.) It took Oscar 3 or 4
evenings after school to unload a car.

We heated with stoker coal and it was my job to keep the stoker full, remove
the clinkers, and so on. We bought the coal one or two gunny sacks full at a
time and I drove them home on the fenders of an old Buick. This started
years before I was old enough to get a driver's license. We had a coal bin
but Dad rarely had enough money to fill it all at once.

When the natural gas pipe line came through some time after 1960 it didn't
take long for everyone except Orin Gridley to get on the gas band wagon.
Orin heated with wood until the day he died.

I remember at least one occasion when coal was dropped on the ground,
shoveled into the back of a truck, driven around to the customer side of the
coal bins, and shoveled into the bins. My mental picture is of coal on the
ground being shoveled into a grain truck but, for the life of me, I can not
recall whether it was dumped from a drop-bottom gon or a hopper car.
Delivery in a gondola was the norm.

The coal bins had a asymmetrical roof, steep on the track side and about a
6/12 on the customer side. Each bin had a pair of doors on the track side
through which the coal was shoveled into the bin. By the time I came along
the coal bin floors were below the level of the adjacent drive and always
water or ice covered, depending on the temperature.

Gene Green

Afterthought! It just occurred to me that immediately before checking these
messages I sent an email to the very fellow who ran the elevator when I was
a kid and who shoveled the stoker coal into those gunny sacks. I'll check my
memory with him.





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

decal sets added

jerryglow2
 

I've modified the URTX-Milw set for the Walthers car to create an as
built version. http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/samples/URTX.jpg
and did two different WM gondolas:
http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/samples/WM_gons.jpg

--
Jerry Glow
The Villages FL
http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/decals

FS New HO Decals from Mount Vernon Shops!

John S. Frantz
 

To Whom It May Concern:
 
Mount Vernon Shops is happy to announce the introduction of the following
new Decal Sets to its line.
 
HO Scale PRR 65 foot Mill Gondolas int he Circle Keystone Scheme. Includes classes G26, G26a, G33, G33a, and G33b. Enough data to do 2 cars.
http://www.mountvernonshops.com/MGCK.html

HO Scale Southern 2-Bay Offset-Side Hoppers.
http://www.mountvernonshops.com/S2HO.html


Some things that my loyal customer following should be made aware of.

1) I am working on more PRR Gondola decal sets and as of right now have another set ready to be sent to the printers.

2)
This past week I also finished a monster set for doing X32 and X33
boxcars in the Circle Keystone Scheme. The set is very comprehensive
covering general service as well as assigned automobile and auto parts
cars.

3) Due to ongoing and future projects involving my
full-time job (selling decals and other products supports my modeling,
but doesn't pay the bills), I anticipate moving within the next month.
This does mean there may be a longer than usual delay in fulfilling
orders until I am settled in my new location. However, this DOES NOT
mean that Mount Vernon Shops will cease to exist. Once I am established
in my new location, the address for sending orders will change and
everything will go on as usual. For those that are curious, I'm moving
to the Greater Philadelphia Metropolitan area.

Finally, you can purchase my products by ether
emailing me, mailing me an order, or as time permits, I do post most of
my PRR product line on Ebay. Prices are the same regardless of how you
choose to
order. Also shipping is a flat $5.00 whether you order 1 or 10 decal
sets.  Please contact me off list if interested.
 
If anyone has any questions regarding the above product or
any others listed on my website please contact me at the following email: jfrantz@...
 
Thank You and Best Regards,
John Frantz
 
Owner,
Mount Vernon Shops
York, PA
 
York, PA
Crossroads of the Pennsylvania Railroad, Maryland & Pennsylvania and Western Maryland Railroads.

Kieth Edwards, saddly, has passed away

x702samc
 

Hello group,

Kieth Edwards passed away yesterday of natural causes at the age of 91.
Kieth and his twin brother Dale co founded Kadee Quality Products back in the 1940's. Around 1990 Kieth and Dale split the company and Kieth took the Micro-Trains Line and Dale retained Kadee.
Kieth retired in 2000.

He'll be deeply missed.

For a bit more info see the Micro-Trains web site. www.micro-trains.com

Sam Clarke
Kadee Quality Products

Re: How to unload coal 1945

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., water.kresse@... wrote:
This "side-delivery" process was more common in the cold  Midwest prior to the First World War .  Normally these cars would dump into a chute going into the basement of a business' boiler house or on the side of an elevated trestle in a coal yard.  I believe farmers coops would sell coal by the bag or by mule wagon delivery.

Al Kresse

Coal was delivered in gondolas - drop-bottom or otherwise - to the Farmers Co-op Elevator in the small Iowa town (pop. 250) in which I grew up. Oscar Barker, one grade ahead of me in school, was paid $15.00 to shovel the coal over the side into coal bins. (Oscar's father died when Oscar was young and the family was in desperate situation financially.) It took Oscar 3 or 4 evenings after school to unload a car.

We heated with stoker coal and it was my job to keep the stoker full, remove the clinkers, and so on. We bought the coal one or two gunny sacks full at a time and I drove them home on the fenders of an old Buick. This started years before I was old enough to get a driver's license. We had a coal bin but Dad rarely had enough money to fill it all at once.

When the natural gas pipe line came through some time after 1960 it didn't take long for everyone except Orin Gridley to get on the gas band wagon. Orin heated with wood until the day he died.

I remember at least one occasion when coal was dropped on the ground, shoveled into the back of a truck, driven around to the customer side of the coal bins, and shoveled into the bins. My mental picture is of coal on the ground being shoveled into a grain truck but, for the life of me, I can not recall whether it was dumped from a drop-bottom gon or a hopper car. Delivery in a gondola was the norm.

The coal bins had a asymmetrical roof, steep on the track side and about a 6/12 on the customer side. Each bin had a pair of doors on the track side through which the coal was shoveled into the bin. By the time I came along the coal bin floors were below the level of the adjacent drive and always water or ice covered, depending on the temperature.

Gene Green

Afterthought! It just occurred to me that immediately before checking these messages I sent an email to the very fellow who ran the elevator when I was a kid and who shoveled the stoker coal into those gunny sacks. I'll check my memory with him.

Re: resin flat car project question

Rob & Bev Manley
 

I'm working on a pair now. I am concerned about accurate decal placement. The only photos I have pulled off the internet are quite fuzzy. Does anybody on this list have a clean photo preferrably in the late 40s to early 50s.

Thank you,
Rob Manley
Midwest Mod-U-Trak
"Better modeling through personal embarrassment"

----- Original Message -----
From: Jon Miller
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, July 25, 2012 12:08 PM
Subject: [STMFC] resin flat car project question



Have the M&StL decals been done yet? Have
watched but haven't seen anything for about 6
months. Did they slide by and I missed them?

Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI user
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

contact request

Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Would Scott Heiden please contact me off list?
Thanks
Pierre Oliver

Re: How to unload coal 1945

spsalso
 

Re:

How those doors work.

It appears to me that there are two sets of three doors on this side of the car. If you compare how the links are wound around (or not, as the case may be) the shaft, you'll see that the far set is wound tightly into what looks to me like a kind of square. I would think these doors are tightly shut. For the near set, two of the doors appear to be slightly open--it looks like I can see some coal showing for the one to the immediate right. Also, the curved link for the far set is slightly higher than the curved link on the two semi-shut doors.

Looking at how the links are set up, I believe that all three of the near doors were previously open, and that the two semi-shut ones have been closed by hand by manipulating the links. If there was still coal on top of the doors, i think it would be pretty near impossible to get the links moved by hand. It does seem that they're being held up by something temporary from underneath, as mentioned earlier. If not, what would be keeping the curved link from dropping down a couple of inches until the short links rested on each other?

I do wonder why the two doors have been propped shut. The shaft for the set is going to have to be wound up later, anyway. I expect it was to get them out of the way to get better access for the unloading.


Fantastic picture,

Thanks,



Ed

Edward Sutorik

Re: How to unload coal 1945

Steve Lucas <midrly@...>
 

The car in the photo is a CN GS gon of the "Enterprise design.  CN inherited a number of 36' versions from the Intercolonial/Canadian Government Railways, possibly CNoR and also the GTR, then had more 40 footers built.  The doors were individually operable.  Later, the doors were sealed and these cars became regular gons.  As built, at least one CGR order had wood sheathing on a steel framed body.

Steve Lucas.  

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Uloading Coal Down South (New Orleans)

reubeft
 

Late 40's there was a small coal yd next to the IC Government Yd. Yard was used to service IC, GCL & T&NO pass trains and power. This little yard had a slightly elevated track with a small pad or pit to dump the coal and a conveyer track unit to put the coal in various piles. I have a aerial pic of the IC yard and this yard was on the other side of the now Earhart Expressway.
The Southern had a coaling tower at its St. Louis St. roundhouse and service area.

Reuben Feuge @ Poplarville, Ms

Re: WM decals

jerryglow2
 

One of Tony's "other possibilities" is me. I did artwork from the same photo he's using but never released it for lack of a model. I'm doing a few for him and will wait to see if there's an interest beyond his.

Jerry Glow
http://home.comcast.net/~jerryglow/decals/

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Thanks to all who replied, on and off the list. Several pointed out the Mount Vernon Shops set for WM Hoppers that is pre-speed lettering. This would certainly provide the basics, though some dimensional data would have to be jiggered. There are a couple of other possibilities too, so I am waiting to see what develops. Thanks again.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

Re: How to unload coal 1945

al.kresse
 

This "side-delivery" process was more common in the cold  Midwest prior to the First World War .  Normally these cars would dump into a chute going into the basement of a business' boiler house or on the side of an elevated trestle in a coal yard.  I believe farmers coops would sell coal by the bag or by mule wagon delivery.



Al Kresse

----- Original Message -----


From: " soolinehistory " < destorzek @ mchsi .com>
To: STMFC @ yahoogroups .com
Sent: Thursday, July 26, 2012 10:41:49 AM
Subject: [ STMFC ] Re: How to unload coal 1945



--- In STMFC @ yahoogroups .com, "Charles Morrill " <badlands@...> wrote:

I was also mystified by that 'only one door open' .  I can't see how that
could be done.  Anybody familier with that mechanism?
Charlie
I believe this is a CN "Otis" car. I'm not as familiar with the Otis mechanism as I am with the Enterprise, but I believe they worked the same in that each operating shaft only dumped one quarter of the car... four doors. If you look under the bib of the wheelbarrow, you'll see a 4x4 propping the third door closed. I think I can see another in the corner of the photo, behind the sill step, propping the first door open.

Dennis



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: How to unload coal 1945

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Charles Morrill" <badlands@...> wrote:

I was also mystified by that 'only one door open'. I can't see how that
could be done. Anybody familier with that mechanism?
Charlie
I believe this is a CN "Otis" car. I'm not as familiar with the Otis mechanism
as I am with the Enterprise, but I believe they worked the same in that each
operating shaft only dumped one quarter of the car... four doors on a Enterprise car, three doors on the shorter CN Otis cars.. If you look
under the bib of the wheelbarrow, you'll see a 4x4 propping the third door
closed. I think I can see another in the corner of the photo, behind the sill
step, propping the first door open.

Dennis

Re: How to unload coal 1945

Charles Morrill
 

I was also mystified by that 'only one door open'. I can't see how that could be done. Anybody familier with that mechanism?
Charlie

----- Original Message -----
From: "North Model Railroad Supplies" <nmrs@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thursday, July 26, 2012 7:37 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: How to unload coal 1945


It appears that the other doors were propped shut so only one door opened to
release its coal load.

The mechanism for that door is the only one extended on that side of the
car.

Things you learn, looking at photos.

Cheers

Dave North








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Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: How to unload coal 1945

North Model Railroad Supplies <nmrs@...>
 

It appears that the other doors were propped shut so only one door opened to
release its coal load.

The mechanism for that door is the only one extended on that side of the
car.

Things you learn, looking at photos.

Cheers

Dave North

Re: WM decals

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Thanks to all who replied, on and off the list. Several pointed out the Mount Vernon Shops set for WM Hoppers that is pre-speed lettering. This would certainly provide the basics, though some dimensional data would have to be jiggered. There are a couple of other possibilities too, so I am waiting to see what develops. Thanks again.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

Re: WM decals

SUVCWORR@...
 

Tony,

Mt Vernon Shops has WM hopper decals that you may be able to make work.

http://www.mountvernonshops.com/

Rich Orr

-----Original Message-----
From: Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
To: STMFC <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wed, Jul 25, 2012 7:55 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] WM decals


Rich Christie wrote:
Tony, The only thing I could find was from TMR Distributing. It is a CDS dry
transfer set for a 52' Mill gon
http://www.tmrdistributing.com/CDS-MZ.htm#wm

Of course the WM road name set and gondola data sets from Champ show up on
eBay from time to time.

Thanks, Rich. If need be I may use the CDS set, though it is for a somewhat
different gondola. The Champ set has a medallion which looks oversize for a
gondola, so I don't know that it would work anyway.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history



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Yahoo! Groups Links

Re: PROPER TRUCKS

brianleppert@att.net
 

Bill,
I may be showing favortism, but I think that Tahoe Model Works' Double Truss Trucks (TMW-107/207) with the wide spring spacing will be the closest match.

Brian Leppert
Tahoe Model Works
Carson City, NV

--- In STMFC@..., WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...> wrote:

I need to know what the best trucks currently on the market are for a Santa Fe RR-22 5o foot steel refer.

Re: WM decals

Bruce Smith
 

Tony,

Not sure if this will help but John Frantz, aka Mount Vernon Shops, who in the past has mostly done excellent PRR decals, has a WM 2 bay hopper set. See http://www.mountvernonshops.com/WM2BF.html

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL
________________________________________
From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...] on behalf of Anthony Thompson [thompson@...]
Sent: Wednesday, July 25, 2012 6:56 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] WM decals

What is the preferred source nowadays for Western Maryland decals, pre-Speed Lettering? A road name set would do although I'm working on a gondola. Thanks for any help.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links