Date   

Re: Poling Pockets

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

Poling, as a practice, would not have been "outlawed" - meaning banned by AAR interchange rules - because no part of the practice nor the presence or absence of poling pockets would affect interchange in any way.

Individual railroads would have forbidden the practice without regard to what other railroads were or were not doing. From my reading of various first person accounts of railroading it appears that the practice of poling continued on a few roads even after it was forbidden by management. Of course, the same could be said for any number of other railroader habits or practices.

I think we can safely say the practice just faded away. The foregoing in no way answers your question "when?"

Gene Green


Re: Alton,Ann Arbor,TH&B,ONT

Armand Premo
 

Thanks Steve.Armand Premo

Sent: Friday, August 31, 2012 10:45 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Alton,Ann Arbor,TH&B,ONT



Looks like Atlas is re-running the old Branchline 40' steel boxcar in RTR with the first TH&B yellow livery--

http://www.modellerschoice.com/DesktopDefault2.aspx?tabid=41&productid=18690

But I found it necessary to do some minor work on the original model to match the prototype more accurately. The ladders had to be changed from 7- to 8-rung for starters.

True Line Trains is re-running their 40' steel boxcar with NSC-2 ends in RTR. Scroll down--

http://www.truelinetrains.ca/freight-cars/1937-40-box-car

Hope that this helps,

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "appremo" <armprem2@...> wrote:
>
> Does anyone have a source for any of the above box car kits or RTR?Armand Premo
>


Trio of Westerfield Kits

Guy Wilber
 

All,

I have the following for sale:

3651 ~ Bx-3, complete with instructions: $17.50
2801 ~ GN SS Auto Car, no instructions: $17.50
1506 ~ 36' Fowler, complete with instructions (green castings): $15.00

Shipping extra, take all three for $40.00 plus shipping.

Regards,

Guy Wilber
Sparks, Nevada
Guycwilber@...










[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: USATC frieght cars

Charlie Vlk
 

Has anyone found an scanned copy available online for download of the Army Manual previously referenced that covers assembly and maintenance of the USATC cars?

I have found some later manuals that primarily detail the operation of USATC diesels, but nothing from the WWII era.

Charlie Vlk


Re: Cadiz Railroad "mystery" flat car -- calling all steam era freight car detectives

Steven D Johnson
 

OK, I had intended to include this information: I personally never saw
this flat car. The photo was taken on May 24, 1987, by a friend, and the
car was scrapped not long after that. To my knowledge, none of the local
railfans ever attempted to examine the underframe for a brake diagram plate
or the trucks for a railroad stamping.



Steve Johnson



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Steven D Johnson
Sent: Friday, August 31, 2012 9:38 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Cadiz Railroad "mystery" flat car -- calling all steam era
freight car detectives





I just created a photo album called "Cadiz Railroad flat car # 107," which
is awaiting approval by the moderator. Hopefully it will be allowed soon
and the photo can be viewed. The Cadiz RR was a short line which operated in
western Kentucky from 1901 to 1988.

I know this is a long shot, but considering the knowledge base of this
group, perhaps someone can identify the heritage of this 40 ft. car. In
researching Cadiz RR records, no information has been found as to when the
car was acquired, but the RR's former president and general manager believes
it was purchased second-hand back in the 1940s. There is a good possibility
the number 107 was its former number from another railroad, so that could be
a clue, along with the style of poling pockets and number of stake pockets
(13 by my count). The elliptical spring truck is a replacement from one of
Cadiz RR's cabooses (former L&N) that was being scrapped in the ca. the
early 1980s. Unfortunately I do not have a good photo of the other truck.

Thanks in advance for any help with this.

Steve Johnson


Re: Alton,Ann Arbor,TH&B,ONT

midrly <midrly@...>
 

Looks like Atlas is re-running the old Branchline 40' steel boxcar in RTR with the first TH&B yellow livery--

http://www.modellerschoice.com/DesktopDefault2.aspx?tabid=41&productid=18690

But I found it necessary to do some minor work on the original model to match the prototype more accurately. The ladders had to be changed from 7- to 8-rung for starters.

True Line Trains is re-running their 40' steel boxcar with NSC-2 ends in RTR. Scroll down--

http://www.truelinetrains.ca/freight-cars/1937-40-box-car

Hope that this helps,

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@..., "appremo" <armprem2@...> wrote:

Does anyone have a source for any of the above box car kits or RTR?Armand Premo


Cadiz Railroad "mystery" flat car -- calling all steam era freight car detectives

Steven D Johnson
 

I just created a photo album called "Cadiz Railroad flat car # 107," which
is awaiting approval by the moderator. Hopefully it will be allowed soon
and the photo can be viewed. The Cadiz RR was a short line which operated in
western Kentucky from 1901 to 1988.



I know this is a long shot, but considering the knowledge base of this
group, perhaps someone can identify the heritage of this 40 ft. car. In
researching Cadiz RR records, no information has been found as to when the
car was acquired, but the RR's former president and general manager believes
it was purchased second-hand back in the 1940s. There is a good possibility
the number 107 was its former number from another railroad, so that could be
a clue, along with the style of poling pockets and number of stake pockets
(13 by my count). The elliptical spring truck is a replacement from one of
Cadiz RR's cabooses (former L&N) that was being scrapped in the ca. the
early 1980s. Unfortunately I do not have a good photo of the other truck.



Thanks in advance for any help with this.



Steve Johnson


Re: 3D printing- want to see one?

Charlie Vlk
 

Bill, Gordon and List-



Gordon is correct..the commercial shops are currently at a level that one
cannot just submit a 3D model and routinely expect acceptable results.



N Scalers like Gordon are on the leading edge of using this technology and
also have rather high expectations.



Complete freight cars, locomotive shells with truck frames to be placed on
commercial mechanisms, trucks, vehicles, scenic details and other goodies
abound on Shapeways.and that is only one place where some very interesting
work is being printed.



Some of the available projects print out very well.I had a replacement roof
and seat pan for a Kato prewar coach that converted it into the CB&Q
"Pattern Dome" cars and I was very pleased with the resolution of the small
roof corrugations, etc.. There was a shrink factor that impacted the
overall length but that was easily compensated for on the model.
Previously a friend who owns a "Prefactory" .a higher end machine that
yields more precise parts than most service bureaus use.who printed a CB&Q
SM-16 composite stock car for me which was done as one piece from roofwalk
to body bolster, with all brake components, freestanding and clear space
between slats and hollow interior. It was done to exact scale so could not
be fitted with trucks and couplers for operation but showed that the process
could yield results that hard tooled injection molding could not easily
duplicate.



I've also had some of Eric Cox's excellent early era truck frames... The
CB&Q No.7 Waycar truck needs only painting; the recommended wheelsets pop
into the frame just like a commercial injection molded part and they roll
very freely. He has an entire range of early (pre-and post-Civil War) wood
and early steel freight car trucks and freight and passenger car bodies and
even link-and-pin couplers.

All this in N Scale.and with resolution superior to resin parts cast from
handmade patterns.



Yes, flat surfaces in certain build orientations are a problem, as are
gently curved surfaces where you get "rice paddy" build layer contour lines.
The build process orientation of the model in the machine can make a big
difference in the results and you do not have much control over how the
bureau does it.. you pay for whatever part they print and sometimes it takes
adjusting parts and combining them in groups to fix non-printing and poorly
printed aspects.



Clearly, the technology is rapidly (sorry for the pun) evolving. It is,
however, at a point that makes it worthwhile for those of us that have an
interest to develop our skills in creating 3D files and begin to try the
process of creating models using Rapid Prototyping Service Bureaus. The
day will surely come when the technology and costs make it reasonable for a
Hobbyist to have a desktop machine in the basement for personal use. When
that happens there will be a community of designers that will be ready to
crank out whatever models that can be created on the screen..and hopefully
we will also develop a way of trading component files that will capitalize
on the modular and common parts of cars and locomotives.



Today the process isn't for everyone, but it is a exciting new aspect of our
Hobby and Bill is correct that it certainly would be worth presentations at
RPM events. It certainly addresses the need of RPMs for specific prototype
models (with variations) that have no reasonable expectation of being made
as hard-tooled commercial products.



Charlie Vlk


Re: 3D printing- want to see one?

Bill Welch
 

Clearly I need to be more succinct and careful in what I am suggesting. Here goes: I think along with the other modeling and prototype presentations or clinics at Naperville and Cocoa Beach, I think it would be interesting if someone--manufacturer, vender, hobbiest, etc.--did a presentation on this technology.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "milepost131" <bushnell.mp77@...> wrote:

There are multiple videos on-line (such as YouTube) that show some of the 3D printers in action. At least those the average model railroader might think about buying for home use.

A good "vendor" probably will never show at a Model RR meet as the chances of making multiple sales is probably remote.

Granted the videos might not show model railroad stuff being "printed." You will see the level of detail. You'll also see the time required.

Yes, some vendors have been known to print a file if you go to a seminar or sales office- NOT complicated files. They want files that are simple (not a fret of multiple parts either) and do not take hours to produce. Also call them beforehand and ask what type of file type they require. And expect you "test" to be passed around if you go to a seminar- they are there to make sales not parts for model railroaders.

Finally, if a service group is having trouble producing levels of detail (Shapeways reduced the level they provide) - remember they are using a commercial grade machine and that costs way more than what you probably want to spend. Heck, it might be cheaper to sell out of HO and shift into a Garden Railway if you want a cheaper 3D printer.

BTW, I've created parts for N scale so I've experimented with a few machines and software packages.

Gordon Andrews


Re: USATC frieght cars

Barrybennetttoo@...
 

Yes, that is why I referred him to the book. It gave rise to a conversation
with someone who does not live in the UK but that has a bt internet
address who did not, of course, understand the SPV referral. This lead inevitably
to chat about ex-USATC locos operating in the UK and elsewhere, apparently
more than there are believed existant in the US.

There is also some info in both the Pullman standard and ACF books.

Barry

In a message dated 31/08/2012 09:34:38 GMT Daylight Time,
clark3332003@... writes:






Barry,

Kaminski's Magor book
_http://www.amazon.com/The-Magor-Corporation-Edward-Kaminski/dp/193001304\;
3_
(http://www.amazon.com/The-Magor-Corporation-Edward-Kaminski/dp/1930013043)
<_http://www.amazon.com/The-Magor-Corporation-Edward-Kaminski/dp/19300130\;
43_
(http://www.amazon.com/The-Magor-Corporation-Edward-Kaminski/dp/1930013043) > shows

Chapter 2 is Export Railcars. `… during WW2, the US War Dept bcame
a major purchaser and between 1942 and 1945 , a total of 7926 railcars
of various types were built…'

Chapter 6 Is A Complete Production List 1925-1968. Shows US War Dept
made 17 orders for flat, gondola, box and air-dump cars, but no tank
cars, from 11/42 to 8/45. Reproduced catalogue pages show 2 axle 4 wheel
cars with buffers. The commonality for the USA lettered orders in 1945
for 500 gondola cars (open wagons) and 800 box cars (goods vans) wav
5' 6" gauge and 36" wheels.

Kaminskii's ACF book,
_http://www.amazon.com/American-Foundry-Company-Edward-Kaminski/dp/096337\;
9100/ref=la_B001K7RE1A_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1346140288&sr=1-4_
(http://www.amazon.com/American-Foundry-Company-Edward-Kaminski/dp/0963379100/ref=la_B001K7RE1
A_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1346140288&sr=1-4)
<_http://www.amazon.com/American-Foundry-Company-Edward-Kaminski/dp/09633\;
79100/ref=la_B001K7RE1A_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1346140288&sr=1-4_
(http://www.amazon.com/American-Foundry-Company-Edward-Kaminski/dp/0963379100/ref=la_B001K7RE
1A_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1346140288&sr=1-4) > shows;

A US War Dept 9906 gallon, 2 compartment tank car built 1943. Quantity
built not stated.

Googling `… USATC… ` gives:

`…. Wagons to GB loading gauge made for the US Army Transportation
Corps, examples of which were used in Britain 1942-1945 before starting
a long life in continental Europe…' on
_http://www.british-ho.freeserve.co.uk/showcase/index_freight-wagons_usat\;
c.htm_
(http://www.british-ho.freeserve.co.uk/showcase/index_freight-wagons_usatc.htm)
<_http://www.british-ho.freeserve.co.uk/showcase/index_freight-wagons_usa\;
tc.htm_
(http://www.british-ho.freeserve.co.uk/showcase/index_freight-wagons_usatc.htm) > which lists 8 cars, one of which is the ACF tank car on
_http://www.british-ho.freeserve.co.uk/showcase/freight-wagons/klein_mode\;
llbahn_usatc-bogie-tank-wagon_1.htm_
(http://www.british-ho.freeserve.co.uk/showcase/freight-wagons/klein_modellbahn_usatc-bogie-tank-wagon_1.htm)
<_http://www.british-ho.freeserve.co.uk/showcase/freight-wagons/klein_mod\;
ellbahn_usatc-bogie-tank-wagon_1.htm_
(http://www.british-ho.freeserve.co.uk/showcase/freight-wagons/klein_modellbahn_usatc-bogie-tank-wagon_1.htm) >

Phil Clark, Catarman, Philippines.
--- In _STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...) ,
Barrybennetttoo@... wrote:

Tell him to buy Ed Kaminski's Magor book from SPV.

Barry Bennett


In a message dated 24/08/2012 03:44:14 GMT Daylight Time,
northbaylines@... writes:




I have a friend in the UK who is wondering about the rolling stock
shipped
to the UK and France to support the Allied effort to liberate the
continent
during WWII. Does any one have information on the design, construction
and builders for the tank, flat, gondola, and box cars that were used
by the
Military Railway Service?

John Barry

ATSF North Bay Lines
Golden Gates & Fast Freights
Cotati, CA

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: USATC frieght cars

Phil Clark
 

Barry,

Kaminski's Magor book
http://www.amazon.com/The-Magor-Corporation-Edward-Kaminski/dp/193001304\;
3
<http://www.amazon.com/The-Magor-Corporation-Edward-Kaminski/dp/19300130\;
43> shows

Chapter 2 is Export Railcars. `… during WW2, the US War Dept bcame
a major purchaser and between 1942 and 1945 , a total of 7926 railcars
of various types were built…'

Chapter 6 Is A Complete Production List 1925-1968. Shows US War Dept
made 17 orders for flat, gondola, box and air-dump cars, but no tank
cars, from 11/42 to 8/45. Reproduced catalogue pages show 2 axle 4 wheel
cars with buffers. The commonality for the USA lettered orders in 1945
for 500 gondola cars (open wagons) and 800 box cars (goods vans) wav
5' 6" gauge and 36" wheels.

Kaminskii's ACF book,
http://www.amazon.com/American-Foundry-Company-Edward-Kaminski/dp/096337\;
9100/ref=la_B001K7RE1A_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1346140288&sr=1-4
<http://www.amazon.com/American-Foundry-Company-Edward-Kaminski/dp/09633\;
79100/ref=la_B001K7RE1A_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1346140288&sr=1-4> shows;

A US War Dept 9906 gallon, 2 compartment tank car built 1943. Quantity
built not stated.

Googling `… USATC… ` gives:

`…. Wagons to GB loading gauge made for the US Army Transportation
Corps, examples of which were used in Britain 1942-1945 before starting
a long life in continental Europe…' on
http://www.british-ho.freeserve.co.uk/showcase/index_freight-wagons_usat\;
c.htm
<http://www.british-ho.freeserve.co.uk/showcase/index_freight-wagons_usa\;
tc.htm> which lists 8 cars, one of which is the ACF tank car on
http://www.british-ho.freeserve.co.uk/showcase/freight-wagons/klein_mode\;
llbahn_usatc-bogie-tank-wagon_1.htm
<http://www.british-ho.freeserve.co.uk/showcase/freight-wagons/klein_mod\;
ellbahn_usatc-bogie-tank-wagon_1.htm>

Phil Clark, Catarman, Philippines.
--- In STMFC@..., Barrybennetttoo@... wrote:

Tell him to buy Ed Kaminski's Magor book from SPV.

Barry Bennett


In a message dated 24/08/2012 03:44:14 GMT Daylight Time,
northbaylines@... writes:




I have a friend in the UK who is wondering about the rolling stock
shipped
to the UK and France to support the Allied effort to liberate the
continent
during WWII. Does any one have information on the design, construction
and builders for the tank, flat, gondola, and box cars that were used
by the
Military Railway Service?

John Barry

ATSF North Bay Lines
Golden Gates & Fast Freights
Cotati, CA











[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Poling Pockets

Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

Looking back at past message posts it appears that there was no specific date or year that poling pockets disappeared from newly-built freight cars. But over time they did cease to appear.

So was the practice of poling outlawed and, if so, when did this happen?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


3D printing- want to see one?

Bushnell.mp77 Account
 

There are multiple videos on-line (such as YouTube) that show some of the 3D printers in action. At least those the average model railroader might think about buying for home use.

A good "vendor" probably will never show at a Model RR meet as the chances of making multiple sales is probably remote.

Granted the videos might not show model railroad stuff being "printed." You will see the level of detail. You'll also see the time required.

Yes, some vendors have been known to print a file if you go to a seminar or sales office- NOT complicated files. They want files that are simple (not a fret of multiple parts either) and do not take hours to produce. Also call them beforehand and ask what type of file type they require. And expect you "test" to be passed around if you go to a seminar- they are there to make sales not parts for model railroaders.

Finally, if a service group is having trouble producing levels of detail (Shapeways reduced the level they provide) - remember they are using a commercial grade machine and that costs way more than what you probably want to spend. Heck, it might be cheaper to sell out of HO and shift into a Garden Railway if you want a cheaper 3D printer.

BTW, I've created parts for N scale so I've experimented with a few machines and software packages.

Gordon Andrews


Re: Alton,Ann Arbor,TH&B,ONT

Armand Premo
 

Thank you .You have helped.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "Jim Hayes" <jimhayes97225@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Thursday, August 30, 2012 11:37 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Alton,Ann Arbor,TH&B,ONT


Sunshine offers an Alton war emergency boxcar & an Ann Arbor 36' boxcar.

Jim Hayes
Portland Oregon
www.sunshinekits.com


On Thu, Aug 30, 2012 at 7:52 AM, appremo <armprem2@...> wrote:

**


Does anyone have a source for any of the above box car kits or RTR?Armand
Premo






------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: 3D printing

Bill Welch
 

Larry, I did not mean you specifically, I meant anyone in the business.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@..., "Larry Sexton" <SSEXTON9@...> wrote:

Bill,



No doubt it would. However, I don't see any way we will have the bugs all
worked out in time to support either event, especially since we just reached
agreement that we won't be able to take our version to the Industry show for
a demonstration later this year. I will say that it's very encouraging when
you start to see how well it prints flat raised details. That's the main
reason for continuing to push the project. There are some items I want for
loads that I'll never see any other way.



Like you, I've got a book to complete, and still have a 50 hour /week job,
and a few other things requiring a lot of my time. Sorry.



Larry Sexton



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
lnbill
Sent: Thursday, August 30, 2012 8:47 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: 3D printing





It could very cool to have someone demo one of these machines at Naperville
and Cocoa Beach.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Larry
Sexton" <SSEXTON9@> wrote:

A work colleague, his son and I have been working since last February on
using a Makerbot to print HO scale freightcars. The original machine
worked
great until the car was 65-75% printed then the printer head would
consistently wipe or smear the molten plastic. We used the ABS ribbon to
print.



We have since been in numerous re-design phases to address the issues of
ensuring that repetitive motions are the same hour after hour, of
under-cooling and the heat build-up phases of the printer heads. Then
there
were sag problems due to wear and weigh of the components.



Slowly but surely the network of designers that are developing the
"printer
bots" are solving the various problems as they arise, but I still believe
most of what we would like to do and the models we'd like to print are
some
way in the future.



I would suggest you Google "printer bots" etc as I believe there is an
industry show very soon where most of the developers will be showing their
creations. You can learn a lot about the capabilities and if you pay
attention, the weaknesses, of the various machines being shown at these
shows.



If you happen to have the 3D CAD drawing of a couple of components, I
believe you will find that some of the developers will do a quick
print-out
for you as a demo at the show. Check several vendors and you could have
the
bases for making a determination of what or whether to buy, or who may
actually be able to print off short runs for you in the future.



Larry Sexton

From: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf
Of
hvyweight41
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2012 9:57 PM
To: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: 3D printing





Has anyone had any experience with the MakerBot company's series of
desktop
3D printer? Their first was the Thing-O-Matic. Their latest is The
ReplicatorT. It was at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) and costs
$1,749.00. It can accept any 3D model but you run it through this compiler
type program that ReplicatorG uses something called Skeinforge to generate
the Gcode for your prints. This "slices" the design into each layer. There
were some discussions about the resolution. The Skeinforge can set the
finest resolution the machine can produce or something less. I believe
like
any printer, the higher the resolution, the longer it takes. Time is money
and your commercial outfits don't want to have long production times. You
can print in either ABS (what LegoR is made of) or PLA (a bio-material
made
from corn). The website is www.Makerbot.com . I'm saving my paper route
moneyto get one. I've been following MakerBot for a while. The
Thing-O-Matic
was $2500 and now the more capable Replciator is $1749. One of the really
nice things is that they advocate open source and shareware. You can post
your designs for anyone to download and use or improve or both! By the
time
I have the $1749, they'll probably have an even more capable model for
less.
Isn't progress great! I will always be a kit builder and the opportunity
to
make unavailable parts true to the prototype is very exciting.

Thanks,
Keith Kempster
Jacksonville, FL

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "teu6500"
<oldmancat@> wrote:


Scott,

The easiest thing to do is Google "rapid prototyping" or "3D printing"
and
you'll probably get the same list I had. Make sure you read their blurbs
to
figure out which ones have the high-res equipment and do one-off
prototypes.

Memory fails me on this point, but it seemed like $150 was basically a
setup charge, then you paid per each. I may have that wrong. Good luck and
let us know if you find a place.

Bob

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Scott H.
Haycock " <shhaycock@> wrote:

I would agree that this is a technology with great potential in our
hobby. The hard part is the steep learning curve of the design programs.

----- Original Message -----







There are online service bureaus for 3D printing, most with an
automated price quote feature: send them the file, they send you a price.
Seems like most of them have a >$150 minimum charge. If you're producing a
model for retail sales, that could be worth the price, but for a couple of
one-offs, no-go.

Bob, I would be willing to pay $150.00 for as many parts as that would
buy, figuring that I could sell the surplus. Could you provide some
company
names that fit your description?

Scott Haycock









[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: 3D printing

Tim O'Connor
 

Back in 1978 I went to a machine tool show in Chicago, and they were demo'ing the latest
computer-controlled multi-mill by feeding a brass bar through, and making little 1" tall pagodas
that were cut off and dropped into a bin, which you could take as samples. It's fun to watch
mills and lathes cut metal -- I'm not sure watching a 3D printer would be as exciting. :-)

The most thrilling machine was a Cincinnati-Milacron lathe with 12" solid steel feedstock and
watching the cutting head peel off a 1/2" layer of solid steel without any vibration or noticeable
change in turning speed.

Tim O'Connor

----- Original Message -----
From: "lnbill" <fgexbill@...>

It could very cool to have someone demo one of these machines at Naperville and Cocoa Beach.

Bill Welch


Re: ERDX Reefers

Armand Premo
 

Thank you Richard.Precisely what I needed.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: Richard Hendrickson
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, August 30, 2012 1:37 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] ERDX Reefers



On Aug 30, 2012, at 10:18 AM, appremo wrote:

> Begging again.Looking for models or photos of early ERDX
> reefers.Early as defined as 30s and 40s.Armand Premo
>
Armand, I'll send you a couple of scans off-line. For more
information on ERDX, see Roger Hinman's excellent book Merchant's
Despatch published by Signature Press.

Richard Hendrickson


Link to CMStP&P Savanna Wreck Photos

Charlie Vlk
 

Thanks for the link. The photos were interesting..and scrolling over I
found a photo of a Hines VA Hospital "critter"...I grew up there, and while
I know they had a siding to receive coal (in Hoppers-mandatory freight car
content) I never knew they had a locomotive, even though I grew up near
there and had a great aunt that worked as a nurse at Hines.

There sure are great resources popping up on the 'net!!!

Charlie Vlk


Re: 3D printing

Larry Sexton
 

Bill,



No doubt it would. However, I don't see any way we will have the bugs all
worked out in time to support either event, especially since we just reached
agreement that we won't be able to take our version to the Industry show for
a demonstration later this year. I will say that it's very encouraging when
you start to see how well it prints flat raised details. That's the main
reason for continuing to push the project. There are some items I want for
loads that I'll never see any other way.



Like you, I've got a book to complete, and still have a 50 hour /week job,
and a few other things requiring a lot of my time. Sorry.



Larry Sexton



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
lnbill
Sent: Thursday, August 30, 2012 8:47 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: 3D printing





It could very cool to have someone demo one of these machines at Naperville
and Cocoa Beach.

Bill Welch

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Larry
Sexton" <SSEXTON9@...> wrote:

A work colleague, his son and I have been working since last February on
using a Makerbot to print HO scale freightcars. The original machine
worked
great until the car was 65-75% printed then the printer head would
consistently wipe or smear the molten plastic. We used the ABS ribbon to
print.



We have since been in numerous re-design phases to address the issues of
ensuring that repetitive motions are the same hour after hour, of
under-cooling and the heat build-up phases of the printer heads. Then
there
were sag problems due to wear and weigh of the components.



Slowly but surely the network of designers that are developing the
"printer
bots" are solving the various problems as they arise, but I still believe
most of what we would like to do and the models we'd like to print are
some
way in the future.



I would suggest you Google "printer bots" etc as I believe there is an
industry show very soon where most of the developers will be showing their
creations. You can learn a lot about the capabilities and if you pay
attention, the weaknesses, of the various machines being shown at these
shows.



If you happen to have the 3D CAD drawing of a couple of components, I
believe you will find that some of the developers will do a quick
print-out
for you as a demo at the show. Check several vendors and you could have
the
bases for making a determination of what or whether to buy, or who may
actually be able to print off short runs for you in the future.



Larry Sexton

From: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf
Of
hvyweight41
Sent: Wednesday, August 29, 2012 9:57 PM
To: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Re: 3D printing





Has anyone had any experience with the MakerBot company's series of
desktop
3D printer? Their first was the Thing-O-Matic. Their latest is The
ReplicatorT. It was at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) and costs
$1,749.00. It can accept any 3D model but you run it through this compiler
type program that ReplicatorG uses something called Skeinforge to generate
the Gcode for your prints. This "slices" the design into each layer. There
were some discussions about the resolution. The Skeinforge can set the
finest resolution the machine can produce or something less. I believe
like
any printer, the higher the resolution, the longer it takes. Time is money
and your commercial outfits don't want to have long production times. You
can print in either ABS (what LegoR is made of) or PLA (a bio-material
made
from corn). The website is www.Makerbot.com . I'm saving my paper route
moneyto get one. I've been following MakerBot for a while. The
Thing-O-Matic
was $2500 and now the more capable Replciator is $1749. One of the really
nice things is that they advocate open source and shareware. You can post
your designs for anyone to download and use or improve or both! By the
time
I have the $1749, they'll probably have an even more capable model for
less.
Isn't progress great! I will always be a kit builder and the opportunity
to
make unavailable parts true to the prototype is very exciting.

Thanks,
Keith Kempster
Jacksonville, FL

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "teu6500"
<oldmancat@> wrote:


Scott,

The easiest thing to do is Google "rapid prototyping" or "3D printing"
and
you'll probably get the same list I had. Make sure you read their blurbs
to
figure out which ones have the high-res equipment and do one-off
prototypes.

Memory fails me on this point, but it seemed like $150 was basically a
setup charge, then you paid per each. I may have that wrong. Good luck and
let us know if you find a place.

Bob

--- In STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> , "Scott H.
Haycock " <shhaycock@> wrote:

I would agree that this is a technology with great potential in our
hobby. The hard part is the steep learning curve of the design programs.

----- Original Message -----







There are online service bureaus for 3D printing, most with an
automated price quote feature: send them the file, they send you a price.
Seems like most of them have a >$150 minimum charge. If you're producing a
model for retail sales, that could be worth the price, but for a couple of
one-offs, no-go.

Bob, I would be willing to pay $150.00 for as many parts as that would
buy, figuring that I could sell the surplus. Could you provide some
company
names that fit your description?

Scott Haycock
















Re: UTLX designs

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Aug 30, 2012, at 10:35 AM, Dave Nelson wrote:

....Q: when AC&F had the occasional build order from UTLX, were those
actually X-3 and X-5 designs they built or the usual products of AC&F
customized for UTLX requirements?
Some of both. In the post-WW-II period when the car builders were
inundated with orders, AC&F told UTL that they would have to accept
ICC-105s built to AC&F's standard design, as AC&F wasn't going to
take the time and trouble to produce tooling for X-5s. So UTL got
some cars of AC&F design. That was part of the reason UTL decided to
start making their own tank cars. See Albert Carr's history of UTL,
John D. Rockefeller's Secret Weapon.

Richard Hendrickson

83821 - 83840 of 194687