Date   

Re: Freight Forwarding

Bruce Smith
 

Why are we guessing? Why are we thinking this is such a big deal?

First, the blog post at http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/ shows a SAMPLE of the 1957 1% commodity flows by carload. I'm not sure why the states on the list were picked, but it surely isn't even close to complete. Certainly you cannot say that Ga shipped more to Wash than any other state when only 3 states are shown!

Second, the 1950 flows show what the product being shipped to Washington is (http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2012/09/georgia-state-to-state-commodity-flows.html) with 13,300 tons of mineral and 6100 tons of misc (total 22,900). This chart also shows that the Ga to Wash traffic is far less than traffic to many other states, and indicates that among states in the region, it is in line and not excessive. (eg Oregon 27500 tons).

I'm also not entirely sure where this validates 4200 carloads, since 23,000 tons is, being generous, around 500 car loads or about 1.5 loads per day.


Bruce F. Smith V.M.D., Ph.D.,

Director, Auburn University Research Initiative in Cancer

Professor of Pathobiology

Scott-Ritchey Research Center

Auburn University, AL 36849-5525

334-844-5587, 334-844-5850 (fax)

http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/faculty/pathobiology-faculty/smith_b

*********************************************************************************

"Evolution is a fact, get used to it"

On Oct 16, 2012, at 10:02 AM, np328 wrote:


My Guess, would be paper, based on a comment I found in a presentation to a gathering of railroaders.
Found in the files section as: Biggest XM Shipper_South001.jpg
Of couse, this being correct would depend on a large amount of printing or publishing taking place in the PNW. Jim Dick

I also am enjoying the material presented in Charles blog.

---
My guess would be that the major commodity in that flow would be carpet from Dalton, GA. Anyone else have any ideas?
Jack Wyatt

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com<mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com>, Jack Wyatt <cjwyatt@...> wrote:
A real oddity on the state-to-state forwarder flows: 4300 carloads a year from Georgia to Washington State? It's by far the largest flow to or from either state.
--- Bill in Seattle


Re: Straight Cuts using a NWSL Chopper

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

I have one additional suggestion in addition to Jack's excellent advice.
With repeated use, the blade creates a grove in the Chopper I and Chopper
III fiberboard mat (if that's the version you use). The material you're
trying to cut may be depressed into the grove, resulting in uneven cuts. The
surface under the blade must be perfectly level, with no visible grove. The
suggested remedy is to fill the grove with epoxy. I have a Chopper III, so I
just moved the lever to next mounting location on the board. Eventually I'll
have three groves to fill, since there are three mounting locations on the
board.



Nelson Moyer

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
asychis@aol.com
Sent: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 8:25 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Straight Cuts using a NWSL Chopper





I'm working on the excellent Boaz resin flatcar kits and wanted to get some
feedback on making consistently straight cuts for the styrene channel
material for the stake pockets. I use an NWSL Chopper and it seems no matter

what I do, the blade deflects when I make a cut and the pieces are not
straight. Is there some better technique or am I missing some procedure
using
the Chopper. This is a problem for me using both the older model with the
hardboard base or the newer models with the plastic mat base.

Thanks,

Jerry Michels


Re: Freight Forwarding

Tim O'Connor
 

Doesn't Georgia have some airplane (or airplane parts) manufacturing ? With Boeing up in Seattle,
could some of this traffic be parts or castings for aircraft? Valuable parts can travel very long distances.

T im O'Connor

----- Original Message -----
From: "Charles Hostetler" <cesicjh@pocketinet.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 8:33:21 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Freight Forwarding

A real oddity on the state-to-state forwarder flows: 4300 carloads a year from
Georgia to Washington State? It's by far the largest flow to or from either
state.
I just double checked this flow and it's real, not a typo. It is consistent with the state to state table for Georgia that I published earlier (an excess of 35 tons to Washington from Georgia in 1950), second table at:

http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2012/09/georgia-state-to-state-commodity-flows.html

So it looks like it is not just a one year anomaly. I will look at this flow in other years when I get back home this weekend.

Glad you are enjoying the data, if anyone has preferences for the next several commodities to be examined pls drop me a note off list and I will try to accommodate.

Regards,

Charles Hostetler


Re: Straight Cuts using a NWSL Chopper

Tim O'Connor
 

I modified my NWSL chopper by putting down two parallel pieces of brass with
just enough room between them for the razor blade. This harder surface combined
with the blade sinking through the slot seems to help to prevent the blade from
deflecting and/or pinching the material. Also the material itself has to be secured
(immovable) while the cut is made.

Tim O'

----- Original Message -----
From: "Steve Sandifer" <steve.sandifer@sbcglobal.net>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 10:39:52 AM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Straight Cuts using a NWSL Chopper

There used to be some chopper type cutters that not only cut down, but
sliced through the material. I wish I had one as I am sure they would do a
much better job. Slicing is better than chopping.


I don't think that the blade is deflecting but that the thin styrene is
flexing. Think of the problem of cutting some HO 1x8s held vertically...as
the blade starts to cut, the strip flexes, resulting in a bad cut.

Jack Burgess
Newark, CA


Re: Freight Forwarding

railsnw@frontier.com <railsnw@...>
 

My thought was somewhat similar, would it be the clay used to make glossy paper?

Richard Wilkens

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "np328" <jcdworkingonthenp@...> wrote:


My Guess, would be paper, based on a comment I found in a presentation to a gathering of railroaders.
Found in the files section as: Biggest XM Shipper_South001.jpg
Of couse, this being correct would depend on a large amount of printing or publishing taking place in the PNW. Jim Dick

I also am enjoying the material presented in Charles blog.

---
My guess would be that the major commodity in that flow would be carpet from Dalton, GA. Anyone else have any ideas?
Jack Wyatt

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Jack Wyatt <cjwyatt@> wrote:
A real oddity on the state-to-state forwarder flows: 4300 carloads a year from Georgia to Washington State? It's by far the largest flow to or from either state.
--- Bill in Seattle


Re: Straight Cuts using a NWSL Chopper

John Hagen <sprinthag@...>
 

Jack,



In my experience I do believe the blade does deflect on my Chopper 2. There
is too much play where the lever pivots on its axle. I intend (someday, I
need to get one of them "round to its") to replace the axle with a much
longer rod to which I will permanently affix the lever so the whole assembly
is "welded" together as one piece. Then I will have to install bearing
blocks, probably four, two on each side of the lever for the purpose of
keeping the lever and the blade in the lever perfectly vertical.



I do not mean to say that the item being cut is not also flexing but I do
feel that all possible movement of the lever as regards it being
perpendicular to the base must be eliminated.



When I get a "round to it" I'll report on the results.



John Hagen



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jack
Burgess
Sent: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 9:14 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Straight Cuts using a NWSL Chopper




I don't think that the blade is deflecting but that the thin styrene is
flexing. Think of the problem of cutting some HO 1x8s held vertically...as
the blade starts to cut, the strip flexes, resulting in a bad cut.

I'd cut with the base of the channel down (like I'd assuming that you're
doing) but with a piece of stripwood shoved into the space between the webs
to support the webs. You might need to glue a couple of pieces of stripwood
together to fit tightly or sand a thicker one. You could also put a larger
(such as an 8x8) piece of stripwood up against the fence of the chopper and
another on the outside of the channel and hold the combination tightly
together as you make your cut...the pieces of 8x8 stripwood would then
support both the outsides and insides of the channel webs. The combination
would keep the webs from flexing as you make your cut. I'd first try to make
a cut with the stripwood (outside supports and the piece inside) just short
of where you need to cut. If that supports the channel enough, then you
would be needlessly cutting the pieces of stripwood with each cut. If that
doesn't work and the channel is still flexing, then move the stripwood
pieces forward enough so that just the minimum stripwood is cut with each
chop.

Make sense?

Jack Burgess
Newark, CA


Re: Freight Forwarding

np328
 

My Guess, would be paper, based on a comment I found in a presentation to a gathering of railroaders.
Found in the files section as: Biggest XM Shipper_South001.jpg
Of couse, this being correct would depend on a large amount of printing or publishing taking place in the PNW. Jim Dick

I also am enjoying the material presented in Charles blog.

---
My guess would be that the major commodity in that flow would be carpet from Dalton, GA. Anyone else have any ideas?
Jack Wyatt

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Jack Wyatt <cjwyatt@...> wrote:
A real oddity on the state-to-state forwarder flows: 4300 carloads a year from Georgia to Washington State? It's by far the largest flow to or from either state.
--- Bill in Seattle


Re: Straight Cuts using a NWSL Chopper

Steve SANDIFER
 

There used to be some chopper type cutters that not only cut down, but
sliced through the material. I wish I had one as I am sure they would do a
much better job. Slicing is better than chopping.



______________________________________________

J. Stephen (Steve) Sandifer

mailto:steve.sandifer@sbcglobal.net

Home: 12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477, 281-568-9918

Office: Southwest Central Church of Christ, 4011 W. Bellfort, Houston, TX
77025, 713-667-9417



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jack
Burgess
Sent: Tuesday, October 16, 2012 9:14 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Straight Cuts using a NWSL Chopper





<I'm working on the excellent Boaz resin flatcar kits and wanted to get
<some feedback on making consistently straight cuts for the styrene
<channel material for the stake pockets. I use an NWSL Chopper and it
<seems no matter what I do, the blade deflects when I make a cut and the
<pieces are not straight. Is there some better technique or am I missing
<some procedure using the Chopper. This is a problem for me using both
<the older model with the hardboard base or the newer models with the
<plastic mat base.
<
<Thanks,
<
<Jerry Michels

I don't think that the blade is deflecting but that the thin styrene is
flexing. Think of the problem of cutting some HO 1x8s held vertically...as
the blade starts to cut, the strip flexes, resulting in a bad cut.

I'd cut with the base of the channel down (like I'd assuming that you're
doing) but with a piece of stripwood shoved into the space between the webs
to support the webs. You might need to glue a couple of pieces of stripwood
together to fit tightly or sand a thicker one. You could also put a larger
(such as an 8x8) piece of stripwood up against the fence of the chopper and
another on the outside of the channel and hold the combination tightly
together as you make your cut...the pieces of 8x8 stripwood would then
support both the outsides and insides of the channel webs. The combination
would keep the webs from flexing as you make your cut. I'd first try to make
a cut with the stripwood (outside supports and the piece inside) just short
of where you need to cut. If that supports the channel enough, then you
would be needlessly cutting the pieces of stripwood with each cut. If that
doesn't work and the channel is still flexing, then move the stripwood
pieces forward enough so that just the minimum stripwood is cut with each
chop.

Make sense?

Jack Burgess
Newark, CA


Re: Straight Cuts using a NWSL Chopper

Jack Burgess
 

<I'm working on the excellent Boaz resin flatcar kits and wanted to get
<some feedback on making consistently straight cuts for the styrene
<channel material for the stake pockets. I use an NWSL Chopper and it
<seems no matter what I do, the blade deflects when I make a cut and the
<pieces are not straight. Is there some better technique or am I missing
<some procedure using the Chopper. This is a problem for me using both
<the older model with the hardboard base or the newer models with the
<plastic mat base.
<
<Thanks,
<
<Jerry Michels

I don't think that the blade is deflecting but that the thin styrene is
flexing. Think of the problem of cutting some HO 1x8s held vertically...as
the blade starts to cut, the strip flexes, resulting in a bad cut.

I'd cut with the base of the channel down (like I'd assuming that you're
doing) but with a piece of stripwood shoved into the space between the webs
to support the webs. You might need to glue a couple of pieces of stripwood
together to fit tightly or sand a thicker one. You could also put a larger
(such as an 8x8) piece of stripwood up against the fence of the chopper and
another on the outside of the channel and hold the combination tightly
together as you make your cut...the pieces of 8x8 stripwood would then
support both the outsides and insides of the channel webs. The combination
would keep the webs from flexing as you make your cut. I'd first try to make
a cut with the stripwood (outside supports and the piece inside) just short
of where you need to cut. If that supports the channel enough, then you
would be needlessly cutting the pieces of stripwood with each cut. If that
doesn't work and the channel is still flexing, then move the stripwood
pieces forward enough so that just the minimum stripwood is cut with each
chop.

Make sense?

Jack Burgess
Newark, CA


Straight Cuts using a NWSL Chopper

asychis@...
 

I'm working on the excellent Boaz resin flatcar kits and wanted to get some
feedback on making consistently straight cuts for the styrene channel
material for the stake pockets. I use an NWSL Chopper and it seems no matter
what I do, the blade deflects when I make a cut and the pieces are not
straight. Is there some better technique or am I missing some procedure using
the Chopper. This is a problem for me using both the older model with the
hardboard base or the newer models with the plastic mat base.

Thanks,

Jerry Michels


Re: Freight Forwarding

Charles Hostetler <cesicjh@...>
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Jack Wyatt <cjwyatt@...> wrote:

<<
A real oddity on the state-to-state forwarder flows: 4300 carloads a year from
Georgia to Washington State? It's by far the largest flow to or from either
state.

--- Bill in Seattle
My guess would be that the major commodity in that flow would be carpet from
Dalton, GA. Anyone else have any ideas?

Jack Wyatt
I just double checked this flow and it's real, not a typo. It is consistent with the state to state table for Georgia that I published earlier (an excess of 35 tons to Washington from Georgia in 1950), second table at:

http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2012/09/georgia-state-to-state-commodity-flows.html

So it looks like it is not just a one year anomaly. I will look at this flow in other years when I get back home this weekend.

Glad you are enjoying the data, if anyone has preferences for the next several commodities to be examined pls drop me a note off list and I will try to accommodate.

Regards,

Charles Hostetler


Re: Freight Forwarding

C J Wyatt
 

<<
A real oddity on the state-to-state forwarder flows: 4300 carloads a year from
Georgia to Washington State? It's by far the largest flow to or from either
state.

--- Bill in Seattle
My guess would be that the major commodity in that flow would be carpet from
Dalton, GA. Anyone else have any ideas?

Jack Wyatt


Re: FGE/WFE/BRE at Naperville

billsoman
 

Too many photos? I'm not sure that's possible. If the final book is thick enough to frighten small children, I believe you're doing it right :-)

Glad to hear of your progress --- Bill Sornsin, Seattle

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "lnbill" <fgexbill@...> wrote:

Earlier this year I succumbed to my experience of 13 years as a photojournalist when realized as I worked on the FGE/WFE/BRE book that I needed to begin to see the photos I have on the page with text, tables, maps, etc. Then I found exactly the classes I needed at St. Pete College to help me learn Adobe's InDesign and Illustrator and I was also able to purchase their Creative Suite as a student. For several weeks now I have been experimenting and applying the learning.

The long and the short of this is that I will have two Prototype chapters with me at Naperville to show interested folks and see and hear their response. These are chapters include three different groups of refrigerator cars that provide a look at my approach to covering the fleet. If you want to see what I am doing, just ask me for a look.

Among the things I would like responses/opinions on are my choice of page orientation, type size, and the number of photos (am I using too many?).

Bill Welch


Re: Freight Forwarding

billsoman
 

A hearty "second" to this, I've been enjoying the blog tremendously.

A real oddity on the state-to-state forwarder flows: 4300 carloads a year from Georgia to Washington State? It's by far the largest flow to or from either state.

--- Bill in Seattle

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "potomacyard" <dlsweeney@...> wrote:

Charles, thank you for your extensive research and analysis on this topic, and on the topic of switching districts. It is very valuable and appreciated.
Dan Sweeney, Jr.
Alexandria, VA


Re: red caboose 1937 aar sq corner

Brian Carlson
 

Richard is correct this was a late in life NKP sidesill reinforcement to
strengthen the sides for loading by fork trucks general. Many roads did
this. However, if as far as a roster of 1937 AR cars don't forget Ed Hawkins
rosters that were in RMJ and later the Steam Era freight cars Website Ted c
ha. I believe the RMJ roster can be found on the Trainlife Website. I
downloaded the PDf from Ted's site years ago.



Railroads in the NE that had these included Erie, DL&W C&O, LV, CP, NYC,
P&LE, CN However doors, roofs, ends varied so work from photos. CN CP and
C&O had square ends. But if you subscribe to the Nelson-Gilbert theory why
limit yourself to the NE <grin>



Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga, NY



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Richard Hendrickson
Sent: Monday, October 15, 2012 10:20 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [STMFC] red caboose 1937 aar sq corner





Mark, those sills were reinforced very late in life, and the door is
not original either. I'll send you off-line an in-service photo
showing the cars as originally delivered. However, note that the NKP
cars in this series, like the Erie cars, had Viking corrugated
roofs. Still, there were a number of other RRs with 1937 spec. AAR
box cars that had square-cornered ends and Murphy rectangular panel
roofs (e.g., UP, SP, NP, Sou, C&EI, T&P), though none that I can
think of offhand in the northeast.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: L&N and NKP gons and flat

Chad Boas
 

All,I have added finished photo's of the cars.
Chad Boas

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Chad" <chadboas@...> wrote:

All,
The next round of kits will be the wood side gons for L&N and NKP.
The L&N is a 46'9" and can be either a flat car or can be ordered with the sides parts. The NKP is a 50'9" wood side gon. The kits will include the Red Caboose pockets for the wood sides.
I have added a file called L&N and NKP gons and flat. The L&N car is there and I am working on getting a picture of the NKP.
I will have these cars avalible for Naperville.
Contact me off list for more information.
Thanks, Chad Boas


Re: Another Shapeways report

midrly <midrly@...>
 

Not just we STMFC modellers interested in RP work and Shapeways. Here is a piece from UK author George Dent on a depressed flat car using rapid prototyping.

<<http://georgedentmodelmaker.blogspot.ca/>>


"A GLIMPSE OF THE FUTURE?
WW2 Warwell produced by automated 3D printing



Is this the way forward for model railway kit production? After browsing the website of Shapeways, I found the range of Wild Boar Models, a specialist in 4mm scale military railway vehicle kits, previewed a few months back in Model Rail magazine. After choosing the wagon I wanted, the transaction is made and then the CAD files are sent to an automated factory in Eindhoven where the model is 'printed' in 3D and dispatched by first class mail.

It's a bit rough and ready, with the acrylic needing quite a bit of work to smooth-out the marks from the laser cutting process. Extra details like builders plates, load shackle loops, brake gear and bogies have to be sourced separately and I doubt the plastic buffers will last long, so they'll have to go. Would it have been easier to scratchbuild? And is it superior to the (rather nice) Genesis Kits whitemetal kit of the same wagon? Well, I'll have to finish this 'kit' off before I make up my mind.

It's worth a look at the Shapeways site. It's certainly an interesting concept and quite a few MR readers have mentioned it in the past. As long as you can design it, they can make it. So it opens up a lot of possibilities to modellers..."

Some images are at--

<<https://www.model-railways-live.co.uk/News/Wild_Boar_Models_announce_range_of_OO_gauge_wagon_kits/>>

Steve Lucas.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "soolinehistory" <destorzek@...> wrote:



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "pullmanboss" <pullmanboss@> wrote:

Time to clear up some misconceptions. There are two inkjet-type heads mounted back to back. One contains body material, the other contains support material, in this case wax. Each head is capable of dispensing its material onto any pixel in a layer in the same pass. Same resolution, same layer thickness... But where there was wax, those tiny marbles that were in contact with the wax will have oozed out from the surface, leaving a rough patch...
Thanks for the more detailed explanation, Tom. So, while the resolution is the same, the effect on surface finish is certainly detrimental. Which leads me to conclude that Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) isn't the right process for mechanical parts like brake cylinders and valves which by their very nature are going to have overhangs somewhere.

I wonder about SLA? From photos of parts like dental crowns it appears that can build an overhang, so long as it is continuous with all the fused material on a given layer, to a point... the Asiga web page makes a claim that their software automatically calculates where "support structures" are needed. The problem is, these support structures are then one with the finished part, and have to be cut away by hand, maybe just a sprue nipper job, maybe much worse.

As to the surface finish on the part in my photo relative to everyone else's, keep in mind my triple valve is but a fraction of the size of what anyone else has posted photos of, so the magnification is much higher.

Dennis


Re: red caboose 1937 aar sq corner

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Oct 15, 2012, at 5:08 PM, Mark M wrote:

Purchased two of these and found the Nickle Plate had something
similar

http://rr-fallenflags.org/nkp/nkp15797aga.jpg

The sill is interesting and wonder if they were built or this is a
modification.

Already have an Erie kit with this body and a viking roof, would
like to make the two different roadnames.

Mark, those sills were reinforced very late in life, and the door is
not original either. I'll send you off-line an in-service photo
showing the cars as originally delivered. However, note that the NKP
cars in this series, like the Erie cars, had Viking corrugated
roofs. Still, there were a number of other RRs with 1937 spec. AAR
box cars that had square-cornered ends and Murphy rectangular panel
roofs (e.g., UP, SP, NP, Sou, C&EI, T&P), though none that I can
think of offhand in the northeast.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: red caboose 1937 aar sq corner

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

Years ago, Des Planes Hobbies had IMWX do a special run of the square end 1937 boxcar with a specially-commissioned Viking roof. They did several roads, including a NKP car (I still have one kicking around my stash of cars). I believe that the deep "fishbelly" under the door was original to the NKP car... maybe someone else can give more information regarding as to who else used this arrangement.


 
Bill Daniels
San Francisco, CA



________________________________
From: Mark M <bnonut@yahoo.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Monday, October 15, 2012 5:08 PM
Subject: [STMFC] red caboose 1937 aar sq corner


 
Purchased two of these and found the Nickle Plate had something similar

http://rr-fallenflags.org/nkp/nkp15797aga.jpg

The sill is interesting and wonder if they were built or this is a modification.

Already have an Erie kit with this body and a viking roof, would like to make the two different roadnames.

Will miss Naperville so you all Have Fun.

Sincerely, Mark Morgan




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


red caboose 1937 aar sq corner

Mark
 

Purchased two of these and found the Nickle Plate had something similar

http://rr-fallenflags.org/nkp/nkp15797aga.jpg

The sill is interesting and wonder if they were built or this is a modification.

Already have an Erie kit with this body and a viking roof, would like to make the two different roadnames.

Will miss Naperville so you all Have Fun.

Sincerely, Mark Morgan

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